Description
Course info
Rating
(83)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 15, 2015
Duration
1h 51m
Description

This is the future of client-side architecture. Together we will explore the latest in React best practices, how to integrate ES6 syntax using Webpack, and the novel concept of "binding to the cloud" using Netflix’s Falcor. Furthermore, you will be delighted by the simplicity of how this all fits together to make a very easy and pleasant architecture to work with.

About the author
About the author

Geoffrey founded PeepCode and has created numerous courses on Ruby, JavaScript and Shell.

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About the author

Brian Holt is presently the redditgifts front-end developer at reddit. This essentially means he gets paid to use JavaScript, CSS, and HTML to help you connect to the world around you, gain deep and meaningful insight, and look at cat pictures for hours.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Project Setup
It's Play by Play at Pluralsight. I'm Geoffrey Grosenbach. Brian Holt has propelled himself along a stratospheric career path working first at Reddit before being sought out and hired away by Netflix. He's also a prolific teacher, helping many developers learn and master web development. In this concise two-hour session, Brian demonstrates the client-side of Falcor, a transparent API server that's in production at Netflix but was only open sourced a few weeks before this recording. He builds a simple recipe application and ties it all together with another hot technology, React. js from Facebook. Oh, and he uses several features of the ES6 language to make it happen. Play by Play's a series where we write live code with skilled developers. We'll move at a fast pace but also, hopefully, provide you with more than a few insights and practical tips that you can use in your daily work. Let's get started. We're in the center of the Technological University in San Francisco with Brian Holt. But you haven't always lived here. You started---you lived very near to where Pluralsight is headquartered in Farmington, Utah. Is that right? Yeah, definitely, just a stone's throw. And what motivated you to move to San Francisco. I'm sure there're lots of reasons. It was a very abrupt motivation. Reddit closed the Salt Lake City office and moved everyone to San Francisco. So I didn't have much of a choice. But now that you're here---I mean, San Francisco is so exciting. All kinds of things happening. If you want to meet anybody who's anyone in technology, you meet him here, even if they don't live here. Like I've been---sometimes I visit, I'll be in a coffee shop, and I'll see somebody from London who just happened to be in town, and there we are. So it's---if people don't live here, they're coming through San Francisco often. I love it. You can just walk into a coffee shop, and there's an engineer from Google, an engineer from Apple. You sit down; you have like a---and there's a brand-new startup born right there. Right there at that table. Exactly. So it's really cool. And you are on---you are a WC3 invited expert on HTML on one of their boards for a little bit. How was that? I did it for about eight months. It was very interesting, very instructive on like how the process takes place, how they take input from different developers, different companies to get things done. I worked a little bit on the testing suite a little bit to help them out with getting new specs out the door. But, other than that, it was a really great learning experience for me. Seems like a lot of those ideas take a while to catch on, though, so maybe in ten years we'll see your best ideas come out in a browser. It's a very long process.