Visual Communication: Creating Engaging and Effective Technical Diagrams

In the world of software development, a lot of information is communicated visually, through diagrams. This course will teach you how to create effective and engaging diagrams.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 31, 2017
Duration
1h 40m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 31, 2017
Duration
1h 40m
Description

Have you ever struggled to create a technical diagram to share with your manager or team? Or have you been the recipient of a diagram that was convoluted, ugly and difficult to understand? If so, this course is for you. In this course, Visual Communication: Creating Engaging and Effective Technical Diagrams, you'll learn how to define the goal and overall design for your diagram. First, you'll be guided through common components of a diagram and basic visual design principles to make your diagram understandable and engaging. Next, you'll discover the benefits of testing your diagram to ensure it's legible and makes sense to your reader. Finally, you'll see heavy use of before-and-after examples to demonstrate what to do and what not to do. When you're finished with this course, you'll have a foundational understanding of visual communication and how to use it to make your own technical diagrams more effective and engaging.

About the author
About the author

Amber is a Microsoft Certified Trainer and Microsoft Certified Professional Developer with 15+ years experience working with and teaching Microsoft technologies. She also focuses on professional skills, bridging the gap between techies and non-techies. For her work as a training leader, Amber received Training magazine's 2013 Emerging Training Leader award.

More from the author
Microsoft Dynamics 365 for Field Service
Beginner
1h 18m
Mar 18, 2019
More courses by Amber Israelsen
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi there, my name is Amber Israelsen, and welcome to my course, Visual Communication: Creating Engaging and Effective Technical Diagrams. I've been a developer, author, and technical trainer for 15+ years, and during that time I've seen a lot of technical diagrams, and created many myself. They've ranged from good to bad to ugly, which prompted the idea for this course. I'm really excited to share it with you. It's hard to quantify the cost of unclear and confusing diagrams in the workplace, but if you've been working in tech for any amount of time, I'm sure you've personally felt some of that pain. You'll receive a diagram from somebody that describes a software system let's say, or data flow through the system, maybe even a diagram showing a process flow for the team. You stare at it for a while and you just can't make sense of it, or you come to the wrong conclusion, based on how it was drawn. In this course, I'll discuss ways to improve that to eliminate confusion and to make the message clear from the get go. I'll walk you through the design process from beginning to end, starting with the goal for the diagram, and the intended audience. We'll look at the components that make up a diagram, and how to apply visual design principles to make the diagram more effective, and more aesthetically pleasing. We'll wrap up with a really fun module, doing some make overs. Starting with not so good diagrams, then applying the principles from the course to make them better. This isn't a course about how to use Visio, or any other tool, and it's not a course about UML. It doesn't focus on any particular type of technical diagram. Rather, when you are finished with the course, you'll have a foundational understanding of how to apply design principles to any kind of diagram with any kind of tool to make your message clear. This course is meant for all technology professionals who need to create technical diagrams as part of their job. There are no prerequisites for the course other than a keen interest to learn. I hope you'll join me in this journey to creating better diagrams in Visual Communication: Creating Engaging and Effective Technical Diagrams, at Pluralsight.