Windows Server Administration Fundamentals Using PowerShell

Microsoft built PowerShell to be the standard for managing and maintaining Windows environments, so you should know how to use it for managing Windows Server. This course is designed to teach you Windows Server almost entirely with PowerShell.
Course info
Rating
(23)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 22, 2016
Duration
8h 28m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction to Windows Server
Configuring Windows Server
Managing DHCP with PowerShell
Managing DNS with PowerShell
Administering Active Directory
Working with Group Policy
Configuring File Services and Storage
Managing Print Services
Implementing Hyper-V and Virtual Machines
Managing Internet Information Services
Monitoring Performance and Troubleshooting
Next Steps
Description
Course info
Rating
(23)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 22, 2016
Duration
8h 28m
Description

For years, Windows Server administrators have relied on the graphical user interface (GUI) to manage servers. In this course, Windows Server Administration Fundamentals with PowerShell, you'll learn foundational knowledge of Windows Server and how to manage Windows server using PowerShell and built-in command line tools. First, you will learn how to configure and manage core network services like DNS, DHCP, and Active Directory. Next, you'll learn how to deploy additional roles such as Hyper-V, File and Print services, and Internet Information server for added functionality in your environment. Finally, you'll learn how to monitor performance and troubleshoot Windows Server. When you're finished with this course, you will have the skills and knowledge of Windows Server needed to deploy, configure, and administrate using just PowerShell and the command line.

About the author
About the author

Michael is a six-time Microsoft Most Valuable Professional, author, technical trainer, and community leader. Having been in the IT industry since the 90's, his experiences covers the gamut of Microsoft technologies, with his main focus being Windows Server, PowerShell and cloud technologies like AWS and Azure. Along with training, he has a passion for connecting people and building community in the IT Pro space. He is the current president and a founding member of The Krewe User Groups, Inc., a world-wide networking group for IT Pros and Developers.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction to Windows Server
When Windows first came out, it introduced us to the world of the GUI, and it was good for a time until administrators grew to rely solely on the GUI, and they forgot about the command line. Now with virtualization, the cloud, and other modern IT technologies, we've come full circle. Now remote management is a needed skill, and PowerShell makes it easy to manage your environments remotely without relying on the GUI. So in this module, I'll do a brief introduction to Windows Server and why you should know how to administer it with PowerShell. Then I'll give you a very small refresher on some PowerShell basics. Should you feel you need more, I'll provide you a great resource to get up to speed on PowerShell. And I'll finish off showing you how to build a replica demo environment of this course. That way you'll be able to follow along with the modules if you choose to. So let's get to it.

Configuring Windows Server
So what's in a name and a number? Well if you're talking Windows Server, a lot! Names help administrators find servers, as well as make it easy for clients to get to their services. And without IP addresses, there would be no communication between devices. So that's what I'll be talking about today--Configuring Windows Server using PowerShell. In this module, I'll start off by walking you through the basics of server configuration like naming, IP configuration, and domain membership. I'll discuss how PowerShell remoting works as I'll be using that in order to work with remote servers during our lessons. This will lead into a demo of finding a newly built server and configuring it for our environment. Next, I'll talk about the roles and features available in Windows Server and why they're important. And I'll finish off with a demo on configuring roles on remote servers using different remote management techniques. So let's dive into the basics of server configuration.

Managing DHCP with PowerShell
IP addresses are key to how networks work. Without IP addresses, nothing would communicate, and no one would get any work done. That's why you need to have a good understanding of how DHCP works and how you can manage your IP address allocations using Windows Server and PowerShell. And that's what I'll cover in this module-- Managing DHCP with PowerShell. In this module, I'll dive into the basics of DHCP, what it is, why you need it, and how it works. Along with that, I'll define terms you should know so you have a good basic understanding of DHCP. Then I'll spend a lot of time showing you the ins and outs of managing DHCP with PowerShell. Almost everything you need to do with a DHCP server as an administrator can be done with PowerShell.

Administering Active Directory
At the heart of almost every Windows network is Active Directory or AD for short. AD provides a centralized mechanism for managing and maintaining many facets of an organization like users, computers, security, and policies. And because of the amount of data contained in AD, PowerShell is a great tool for gathering information, as well as managing objects within AD. So that's what you'll learn in this module--Administering Active Directory. First, I'll discuss the fundamentals of Active Directory--what it is and how it works. Then you'll dive into the components of AD so you understand what encompasses an Active Directory environment. This includes things like domains, forests, and domain controllers. Then I'll focus on objects in AD. I'll introduce you to the important objects you'll be working with on a regular basis. Throughout the entire module, you'll see how easy querying AD is. And that is one of the tasks you perform regularly when working with AD. Remember Active Directory is a big database with lots of information at your disposal. And PowerShell makes it easy to retrieve the information you need. So let's get started with Active Directory.

Working with Group Policy
So it's Friday afternoon, and your boss comes by your office. He needs you to change the desktop background for all users in your organization to a new branded desktop. And it needs to roll out on Monday. Back in the old days before centralized Group Policy, this would take some tricky scripting and a good amount of time. With Group Policy, it's done before your coffee gets cold, and you have time to enjoy the weekend. You'll learn how to do this and much more in this module--Working with Group Policy. Group Policy is a part of AD that provides centralized management of users and computer settings. I'll discuss how it works and how you can manage it with PowerShell. I'll dive into Group Policy targets and how Group Policies are processed for users and computers. You'll learn about different types of GP settings, policies and preferences, and why you would use one over the other. And as you probably expect, it will be done almost entirely with PowerShell with lots of hands-on demos. One word of caution with Group Policy and PowerShell: Like some of the other areas of Windows Server, Group Policy is fully accessible through the GUI but not entirely user friendly via PowerShell. So I'll be introducing you to some GUI tools so you can visualize pieces of Group Policy that I'm talking about, as well as know where to go when you need to do something not easily managed through PowerShell. So let's get started with Group Policy.

Configuring File Services and Storage
For many administrators where you put your data and how people get to it are two really important pieces of a Windows network. Storage is more than just hard drives. It's how you allocate your physical drive space and make it available for storing your data. Once you have storage, then you need to work with files and folders to manage the data. And that is what this module is about, Configuring File Services and Storage. So you'll start out learning the basics of storage in a Windows network. I'll cover working with disk volumes so you know how to allocate your physical disk space effectively using PowerShell. Then I'll introduce you to the new feature in Windows Server, Storage Spaces. Storage Spaces provides in-the-box storage virtualization for better allocation of your disk space. Once storage is configured, I'll show you how to work with file folders. You'll learn about file shares and how to deploy them, along with discussion on using permissions to access resources. So let's get to talking about storage.

Managing Print Services
While many things change in IT, printing is one of those areas that remains fairly consistent. Even with all of the electronic options available today, many users and organizations still rely on printing on a daily basis. So it's important to have an understanding of how printing works on Windows Server and how to manage print services. So that's what will be covered in this module--Managing Print Services. First, I'll explain the Windows printer model. This will help you understand the terminology used by Microsoft in their printing implementation and also what I'll be talking about throughout the module. Also, I'll review the basic types of printers you'll run into. I'll review the print server roles on Windows Server and show you how to go about installing them. Then I'll dive into working with printers. You'll learn to gather information about printers and components, add printers into your environment, and perform basic management tasks on a print server. And I'll spend some time discussing permissions as well. Like file permissions, printer permissions are not easily managed through PowerShell. I'll show you one of the recommended ways for managing permissions that combines GUI and PowerShell tools. So let's take a look at the Windows printer model.

Managing Internet Information Services
It seems everything we do today is based on the internet--music, photos, social media, banking. Every day it feels like some new app comes out that we can't live without. To power our internet-based lifestyles, we need web servers. Web servers provide platforms for accessing all of these things we need to keep our lives connected and running. And that's where Internet Information Services or IIS comes in. IIS is the basis of Microsoft's web services platform, and it's built right into Windows Server. Trust me when I say this: Lots of administrators take IIS for granted. They have a hard time working in IIS and deploying simple services like websites. So that is what I'll cover in this module--Managing Internet Information Services. So to start, you'll learn the basics--what a web server is, the type of services they provide. Then once you have that understanding of what a web server is, you'll dive head first into installing IIS and deploying services like web pages and document directories. One of the most important pieces when setting up web services is bindings. You'll learn what bindings are and how to implement them properly in IIS. And no discussion of web services would be complete without security. I'll introduce you to secure socket layer or SSL, a commonly used security protocol for securing web connections and how to use it to secure your web traffic. So let's get started with web services basics.

Monitoring Performance and Troubleshooting
Performance monitoring is important as it provides a view of how a server's doing so you can be proactive about future upgrades, stave off possible problems, and just keep things running. And troubleshooting is something you do every day, so you need to have a good methodology in place. So that's what we'll cover in this module--Monitoring Performance and Troubleshooting. So I'll introduce you to some tools to assist you along with basic troubleshooting technology. First, I'll cover working with performance monitoring and review some basic counters that are helpful when monitoring servers. Then I'll show you how to work with performance counters and WMI and CIM so that you can pull information out of your servers. I'll finish off with basic troubleshooting and give you a tried-and-true methodology that you can use right away. So let's dive into performance monitoring.