Expanded

3ds Max Reference Library: World Space Modifiers

In this series of 3ds Max tutorials, we will take an in depth look at the world space modifiers in 3ds Max. Software required: 3ds Max 2012.
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Oct 3, 2011
Duration
1h 34m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Oct 3, 2011
Duration
1h 34m
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Description

In this series of 3ds Max tutorials, we will take an in depth look at the world space modifiers in 3ds Max. Each video in this collection of tutorials is a self-contained lesson centering on one of 3ds Max's world space modifiers. This means that these tutorials can be viewed in any order you wish, allowing you to jump straight to the content that is most beneficial to you. Over the course of these lessons, we will discuss all of the parameters and options found in 3ds Max's world space modifiers. Software required: 3ds Max 2012.

About the author
About the author

Joshua is a devoted games author at Pluralsight. For years Joshua was a key author behind Digital-Tutors' (now a Pluralsight company) popular game engine training. As a kid, he had a passion for playing video games, which eventually developed into a fascination with the process of game creation. The question of "How'd they do that?" led Joshua on a quest to learn to make these games himself. Ever since then, Joshua has devoted his life to creating games, as well as teaching others to build their own fantastic video games.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
The Camera Map World Space Modifier applies UVW coordinates to the object based on a specified camera. So let's say we wanted to actually create a 3D scene of a 2D image that we've created, or a picture that we've taken. And we want to actually use this as the texture. Well we can use the Camera Map World Space Modifier to do that. So what we would do is we would have our picture in our scene here. And I've just applied this as a viewport background. So you can go to Views and Viewport Background and apply it that way. Now what's really important about this is you want to make sure that whenever you apply this, you want to make sure that you are actually using the Match Rendering Output whenever you use this. Okay. So let's go ahead and hit Ok on this. And what I want to do is go ahead and show you that I've already created some geometry for this. So I've created a plane for my background as my sky. I've created a piece of geometry for my mountain, and another one for this irregular piece of mountain on that. And then also for my water, okay. So what we want to do at this point is go ahead and use the Camera Map Modifier to apply the texture of our 2D image onto our 3D geometry. Okay, and we're going to actually use our camera to map this for us, or to create UVW coordinates for us. So let's go to our Modify panel. And we're going to use the Modifier List. And Camera Map World Space Modifier. Now once this is applied, we need to actually associate a camera to our object here. So let's go to Pick Camera, and we're going to go ahead and choose our camera in our scene. So once that is applied, you can see Camera001 has been associated. But you'll notice that nothing has actually happened in our scene, and the reason that we can't see that is because we don't actually have a material or a map on our object. So let's go ahead and create that. So we're going to go to our Material Editor. Now I am going to go ahead and use the Compact Material Editor because with the Camera Map Per Pixel map that I'm going to be using was having some issues and it was causing my renderer not to come up, so I found a quick little workaround to use the Compact Material Editor. So what we're going to do is we're going to create a diffuse map, so we're going to hit our shortcut here. And we're going to choose this Camera Map Per Pixel. And this is really going to help us whenever we apply a texture to an object, it's going to kind of fill in some pixels if it needs to, if they're being stretched. Okay, so let's use that and we're going to associate the camera that we're going to use. So in this case it's Camera001. And now we're going to choose the texture that we're going to use. So we'll go to Bitmap. And I'm going to use this landscape here, and hit Open. Okay. Now this, I'm going to go ahead and assign this. And hit the Show Shaded Material in Viewport. And let's go ahead and close our material. And you can see that we have a bitmap that has been applied to this plane, and we can see the water on here. Now it does look a little funny. It looks like we've got some stuff kind of cutting in here and that's not really what we want, but I do want you to know that you need to trust your render before you trust your viewport. So let's go ahead and do a quick render. And let's make sure that we do a quick render of our camera here. There we go. And you can see that our material has applied itself quite nicely to this ground plane. Okay. So let's close this out. And let's do the same thing to our mountain here. Now let's go to our Modifier List, Camera Map. We're going to pick our camera here. And then we're going to apply that same material that we just used onto our mountain. So let's go ahead and assign material. And let's close that out. And you can see that now our mountain material has been applied to our object. So let's do a quick render of that. And again, let's make sure that we're in our Camera Viewport and hit that. There we go. Now you can see that we've got a little bit of clipping going on. We've got little pieces of our sky that was in our background. And if you want, you can go ahead and adjust those vertices as needed. But in this case, we're not going to get too meticulous with this. But the great thing about Camera Map is it really does allow you to go ahead and adjust the object to the texture, rather than the texture to the object, which is much, much easier. So let's go ahead and close this out. And let's do the same thing to this little pillar here for our rock. And we're going to use our Camera Map. Pick Camera. Do this again. And we'll apply that material. And that has been applied to our pillar there. So let's do a quick render of that. And again, we need to choose our camera so we can actually see that. And there, now you can see that we've got a little bit of our sky clipping in here. And you can go ahead and adjust that as needed. But again, that's being very meticulous for this lesson here. So let's go ahead and close this out. And the final thing that we want to do is go ahead and create a sky here. Now, I don't want to use the sky that's actually in my material that I started out with. I want to use a different one just to show you how this can really help you. So let's go ahead and do the same thing. Let's do a Camera Map on this. And we're going to pick our camera. And we're going to go to our Materials, but instead of using this material, we're going to choose a different one and create a brand new one. So let's use this diffuse color. Let's do that Camera Map Per Pixel. We're going to choose our camera. And we're going to go to Texture, but this time we're going to actually use a different sky. Let's actually use this red sky. And we're going to hit Open. And let's go ahead and apply that. Let's Show Map in Viewport. Okay, there we go. So now we go ahead and do a quick render of this, and we've got a totally different scene. Now again, we need to go ahead and adjust those vertices on our mountain just to kind of get rid of that blue there. But again, I'm not really going to worry about this seeing how we're just talking about the Camera Map World Space Modifier. I really don't want to obsess over these little points across the top of our mountain here. So this is a really neat tool here, and what we can do now is go ahead and add some lights in to really kind of make the sky and the rest of the image really come together. So this is a great way to get some really quick compositing going here. So we can go to our lights, and we can create a couple of omni lights in here. Create one off here in the distance and let's go ahead and just kind of play around with it first. And I'm going to go ahead and change its color. Let's give it kind of one of these red colors in here. So let's just choose one of those. And I'll hit Ok. And let's go ahead and do a quick render of that. And you can see how we're kind of matching this up a little bit. And we could do another light in here. We can just click and drag. We're holding down Shift and moving that light. And let me change the color on this one. Let me choose like maybe this orange color. Oh, try that one more time. Use our eye dropper. We'll hit Ok on this one. And now let's take a look at this, let's see what we've got. So we've got a couple of different lights in here. I might want to change the color of that background light. Actually I'll just take it down, give it a different multiplier, just kind help that with some fill there. Okay, so now what you could do is go ahead and create a brand new camera in your scene. So let me go to my perspective here. And let me actually hit C on my keyboard to go to my regular camera. Now you'll notice with this camera that I'm actually seeing a little bit more than what I see in here, and that's because I don't actually have Show Safe Frames turned on with this viewport here. So let me actually go ahead and hit P on my keyboard to go to Perspective. And I'm going to actually hit control-C to create a brand new camera, so you can see this Camera 002. Let's click on this and hit Show Safe Frames. So here we're seeing the same thing. But with Camera002 what I'm going to do is actually animate it to kind of move into my scene here. So let's go to frame 100. I'm going to turn on Auto Key. And I'm actually just going to dolly this camera forward. So let's just go ahead and move this camera forward. And what I have is a target camera there. Let me go ahead and turn that off. So let me change this to Free. And now let's go ahead and dolly this forward. Okay, so we have our camera moving forward in our scene, getting a little bit closer to our image, or to our geometry in here. Alright and then we'll just stop right there. So let's go ahead and turn off Auto Key. And let's play this and you can see how you can create a 3D scene from a 2D image and just kind of composite this and make it look really neat. Now you do want to watch out for some areas that might be clipping. As you can see, this little hole right here, you might want to cover that up. So you can do that pretty simply just by selecting your geometry. And that's basically just this one little point right here. Now if you go to Editable Poly and you see this change, just hit the Show End Result and that will switch that back. So I don't want anybody to freak out over that. Okay so let's go to Move and just kind of cover this hole up here. Just kind of push this forward. Alright, so now if we play this the rest of the way, we've got our 2D image is now turned into a 3D piece of geometry, a 3D scene. So we've discussed a couple of different ways that we can actually use this Camera Map World Space Modifier.