After Effects CC Rendering

In After Effects CC, rendering is the process of exporting your composition and creating a playable movie file. This course will teach you how to increase the quality of your renders, and the speed of your rendering workflow. Software required: After Effects CC
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 21, 2017
Duration
1h 22m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 21, 2017
Duration
1h 22m
Description

Rendering is the process of exporting your composition and creating a playable movie file. When you preview your composition in After Effects to check your work, you are also rendering. In this course, After Effects CC Rendering, you'll be learning how to speed up your workflow in After Effects CC by learning techniques to increase the quality and speed of your RAM previews, pre-renders, and your final exports. First, you'll explore the preview settings, behaviors and controls, and how to optimize the Media and Disk Cache in order to produce smoother previews more quickly. Next, you'll discover how to render using the Render Queue and Adobe Media Encoder, along with the various settings. Then, you'll cover some of the different file types and which ones support alpha channels, along with the various codecs available and why you would choose them. Finally, you'll learn the difference between the Classic 3D, Ray-traced 3D, and the Cinema 4D composition renderers. By the end of this course, you'll know how to optimize your project settings in order to generate quicker previews. Software required: After Effects CC

About the author
About the author

A skilled CG Artist with a passion for creating 2D and 3D animation, John Briggs has worked on many projects for clients over the years, including Motion Graphics and 3D Environments. He currently works as an Online Learning Developer at a University, and is also a lecturer at a college.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is John Briggs, and welcome to my course, After Effects CC Rendering. I am a learned technologist at one of Scotland's universities, and I'm also a lecturer of teaching computer animation at one of Scotland's largest colleges. In After Effects, rendering is the process of exporting your composition and creating a playable movie file. When you preview your composition in After Effects in order to check your work, you are also rendering. In this course, we're going to take a look at the settings within After Effects CC that will allow you to optimize your project, generating quicker previews and renders. Some of the major topics that we'll cover include previews and setting up the media and disk cache, After Effects render queue, classic 3D renderer, ray-traced renderer, and the Cinema 4D renderer. By the end of this course, you'll know how to optimize your project settings in order to generate quicker previews, and you'll learn how to output your composition using a variety of techniques, presets, and custom settings in order to get the best performance out of the software. In addition to this, you'll also learn about the various renderers available, including the new to After Effects CC 2017, Cinema 4D renderer. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the fundamentals of After Effects. So I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn some great rendering techniques to improve your workflow with the After Effects CC Rendering course, at Pluralsight.

Render Queue
In this module, we'll be adding the comp to the render queue. We'll take a look at the render settings, module output, and output too. We'll cover file formats and the various codecs available, and why you should choose them. You'll also learn how to create a render settings template and a module output template using your own custom settings to optimize the final output, how to render a comp with transparency, and when it would be a good idea to render an image sequence as opposed to a movie file. We'll also look at outputting into various formats at the same time while only needing to render once.