Developing SharePoint 2013 Solutions with JavaScript - Part 2

This course shares more on how to use JavaScript in SharePoint 2013 customizations.
Course info
Rating
(58)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 12, 2015
Duration
3h 45m
Table of contents
Authentication and Security
Cross-Domain Interaction
Logging
Performance
MDS
TypeScript
Wrap-Up
Description
Course info
Rating
(58)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 12, 2015
Duration
3h 45m
Description

Building on the foundation provided in part 1, this course introduces more advanced topics and details on important aspects of SharePoint 2013 programming with JavaScript. Covering everything from security, to logging, to MDS and TypeScript, this course is heavy on demos and sample code. If you want to write solid, professional JavaScript code as part of your SharePoint 2013 customizations, this course is for you.

About the author
About the author

Dave is a start-up co-founder and CTO, an 11-time Microsoft MVP, and full-stack web developer, trainer and author focusing on JavaScript, NodeJS, document DBs and C#.

More from the author
Learning RxJS Operators by Example Playbook
Intermediate
3h 48m
Dec 19, 2018
Functional JavaScript Libraries Playbook
Intermediate
2h 59m
Jun 1, 2018
Constructing a User Interface with Angular
Intermediate
4h 35m
Feb 5, 2018
More courses by David Mann
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Authentication and Security
Hi, welcome to Part 2 of the Pluralsight course Developing SharePoint 2013 Solutions with JavaScript. My name is David Mann and I'm your instructor. As I mentioned, this is part 2 of the course, part 1 is available on the Pluralsight website, and it covers some introductory material as a predecessor to the material in this course. If you're interested, here's the full Table of Contents for part 1. If you're not comfortable with SharePoint/JavaScript, both JSOM and REST, I strongly recommend that you watch part 1 first. This part of the course assumes that you're familiar with all of that material. We're not going to be rehashing the material that we already covered there, so it's going to be important that you're up to speed with the material in that course in order to understand the material in this course, and then in part 3, which follows. In this course we're going to take a look at the following topics. Authentication and security, finishing up a little bit of JSOM started in part 1, and then adding in security programming with REST. Cross-domain interaction, for our purposes primarily calling from an app web back into the host web. Logging, part of our professional development discipline, but one that's too often overlooked while we're doing our JavaScript programming. Performance, always important, but surprisingly to many people not the most important element of a good app. MDS, SharePoint 2013's Minimal Download Strategy. It's a way of improving perceived performance, but it's an extra hoop we need to jump through for our code. Type script, just an introduction and some examples of what a lot of developers wished JavaScript were, as well as a look at how we can use it in our SharePoint JavaScript programming. In this first module we're going to focus on three things, authentication, security programming, which is where we'll spend the bulk of our time, and then we'll finish with a short discussion on security in SharePoint 2013 apps.

Cross-Domain Interaction
Hi and welcome to module 2 of the Pluralsight course Developing SharePoint 2013 Solutions with JavaScript, Part 2. My name is David Mann and I'm your instructor. Here's a quick look at where we are on this course. We finished up module 1, Authentication and Security, and now this module is going to cover Cross-Domain Interaction. Cross-domain interaction is exactly what you think it is, calling from one domain to another. Normally cross-domain, or as it's more commonly called, cross-site calls, via JavaScript, are blocked by browsers as a security measure. That doesn't mean that all cross-domain calls are a security risk, or that you should avoid them, it just means that we need to be more careful with them and we need to jump through a few extra hoops to make them work. We're going to talk about the different options for doing cross-domain calls throughout this module.

Performance
Hi and welcome to module 4 of the Pluralsight course Developing SharePoint 2013 Solutions with JavaScript, Part 2. My name is David Mann. Here's where we are in the course. We finished the first three modules, and in this module we're going to take a look at Performance. Performance is a little bit of a tricky beast when it comes to web applications because there are so many variables to deal with, and as I discussed in the first part of the course, performance itself isn't really what users care about, they care about the perception of performance. If a piece of functionality on our site feels fast, then it really doesn't matter what our performance testing says about how fast it actually is. It feels fast to the user, and that's all that matters. That said, there are a couple things that we can do to improve both the actual performance and the perceived performance of our site. We'll cover that in this module. In addition, we'll talk about some common performance problems, how to do some basic performance testing, and along the way cover a few gotchas that you need to be aware of.

MDS
In this module we're going to cover some things you need to know in order to have your code operate successfully in an environment which has SharePoint's Minimal Download Strategy enabled. First a quick look at where we are in the course, and a reminder of what's to come in later modules. Now we can get started with MDS. I'm not going to spend a whole lot of time describing MDS, it's a pretty simple concept, I'm also not going to spend time delving into the depths of the architecture, explaining how it performs its magic. The focus of the module is how to program in an MDS environment, so we're going to describe MDS briefly, talk about some problems it presents to our JavaScript code, and then spend the bulk of our time working our way through the solutions to those problems, or how we need to adapt our code in order to have it operate successfully when MDS is enabled.