Cyber Security Awareness: Digital Data Protection

This course will teach you some steps to better protect your data from cyber attacks.
Course info
Rating
(20)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Dec 20, 2016
Duration
49m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(20)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Dec 20, 2016
Duration
49m
Description

Malicious individuals getting access to your data is always something to be concerned about. This course, Cyber Security Awareness: Digital Data Protection, hopes to help alleviate some of those conerns. First, you will learn about the nature of data thefts today. Next, you'll dive into learning about digital data theft. Finally, you'll explore different fixes that are available to make your data usage safer. By the end of this course, you should feel more confident in your ability to protect you're own data.

About the author
About the author

David is a co-founder of Absio Corporation, a cybersecurity company. He has over 30 years of experience in technology sales and marketing, consulting engineering, and project management. He is a recognized expert and has written extensively on the topics of data-centric security and control and email security.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction
Hello, and welcome. I'm David Kruger on behalf of Mentor Source and this is part of our Cyber Security Awareness series. I am vice president and a co-founder at Absio corporation, a company that provides a new approach to information security, the ability to secure and control your data everywhere all the time. I have more than 35 years of experience in consulting, project management, business development, and customer support. I am on the operations board of the National Cyber Exchange, which is an organization of the National Cyber Security Center in Colorado Springs. I have published and been a contributing author of numerous white papers and articles about safety and cyber security. Today, I'm excited to share some ideas with you and your organization on digital security, privacy, and intellectual property protection. Private sector businesses, government agencies, and private citizens are losing the war to keep their digital data from being stolen. Every day brings reports of new data breaches, identity theft, intellectual property, loss, military and diplomatic secrets are divulged, financial fraud, or humiliating disclosures made by some hack of this collective. Losses are projected to cost the world economy an estimated half a trillion dollars in 2016 and they are expected to top $2 trillion by 2019. If that's accurate, based on 2014 numbers, US losses will exceed 2% of their total US GDP by 2019. By any measure, this problem has reached crisis proportions.

Security Overview
We've got three broad categories of cyber threats. First of all, you've got data theft. That one is pretty obvious. Everybody knows about that. People take data for all sorts of reasons. The second category is denial of service and you get circumstances like the dying hack October of 2016, which shut down websites all up and down the eastern seaboard and some very large corporations. And the denial of service takes other forms like ransomware, basically anything that keeps you from doing your job when that job requires a computer. In the third category, fortunately, we have not seen much of, but it's a little bit frightening when you think of that and that is integrity attacks, things that are meant to distort data or destroy data. Those are possible. We've seen a few of them. Fortunately, they're not common yet because those really are acts of war. Also in the sort of data alteration or lack of integrity type of attack, with the recent elections, people with good cause were worried about electronic voter fraud. That would be an area where you just had to make very minor changes in the data, undetectable changes in the data, most likely, that would've had a very significant leverage on the outcome.