The Eclipse Guided Tour - Part 1

A detailed exploration of Eclipse, the open source integrated development environment that runs on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. This course will guide you through leveraging the power of Eclipse and getting productive quickly.
Course info
Rating
(393)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 8, 2013
Duration
4h 21m
Table of contents
Getting Started
Eclipse Workbench Overview
Project/Package Explorer In Depth
Editing Code
Customizing Eclipse
Code Navigation
Advanced Navigation and Searching
Leveraging The IDE
Description
Course info
Rating
(393)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 8, 2013
Duration
4h 21m
Description

Eclipse is a powerful open-source software development framework that runs on multiple platforms and is suitable for developing programs in many languages. Target applications can run on anything from the desktop or mobile device down to tiny 8 bit embedded processors. This course will focus on Java and C++ development but most of the content is applicable for developers in any language. This course is aimed at developers new to Eclipse AND for those that have already used Eclipse but haven't explored the full power of the IDE. Once you finish the course you'll be coding more and typing less.

About the author
About the author

Tod has been programming anything he can get his hands on since 1980 when he accidentally discovered an Apple ][ at Argonne National Labs.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Getting Started
Welcome to the Eclipse Guided Tour course. My name it Tod Gentille. This is Part I of a two part course aimed at making you quickly productive in the Eclipse integrated development environment. Eclipse is a very capable and sometimes complex product. For flexibility, it's designed on a plug-in architecture. This makes it extremely useful for software development for a wide variety of languages and target platforms. It's used for desktop programs, embedded programs, web page development, and even mobile platform development. In this first module, we'll explore getting started and a little bit about the Eclipse architecture.

Eclipse Workbench Overview
Welcome back to the Eclipse Guided Tour course. My name is Tod Gentille. In this module we're going to take an in-depth look at the Eclipse Workbench. I want you to have a good overview of how Eclipse is laid out and designed to work so that you can maximize your productivity once you start developing with Eclipse. In this module I first want you to be aware of the terms Eclipse uses for various facets of the IDE. This will allow you to recognize the choices you'll need to make in menus and toolbars, but the majority of this module will be spent in Eclipse itself. A view is the Eclipse name for unique content area that accomplishes a given task. Project Explorer, Outline, and the Console are examples of three views. A perspective is just the layout of a particular collection of views. As soon as we open Eclipse we are in a particular perspective. There is typically one perspective for developing code and one for debugging. Java will have one set of perspectives, and C++ will have another. There can be many more as well. You can have a perspective for Source Code management tasks if you like. We're going to cover all the major views you'll use in your daily work. Since Eclipse is used to develop software, we will take our turn at producing the mandatory Hello World example. I'll conclude with the a look at the Quick Access feature of Eclipse. I like to think of Quick Access as the one feature to rule them all. Quick Access will let you do almost anything in Eclipse without lifting your hands from the keyboard. If you're going to memorize or reassign a keyboard shortcut, this is the one. Let's go to Eclipse.

Project/Package Explorer In Depth
Welcome to the Project Explorer module of the Eclipse Guided Tour. My name is Tod Gentille. We're going to take an in-depth look at the Project Explorer and some associated tasks. Project Explorer is easier to demonstrate if we have a large number of files, so we'll download some sample files for Java and C++. The links will be repeated on the resources slide at the end of this module. Once that is done, we'll switch over to Eclipse and look at some context sensitive actions you can take on the Explorer view itself and on the folders and files inside that view. Most of these actions are applicable to software development in multiple languages, but we'll also briefly take a look at a couple of important actions that are only applicable to C++, and they're unusual in that as far as I know they are only available from the Context menu. We'll take a brief look at the iconography used by Java and C++, and I'll show you where to find the comprehensive list of the icons used. Java has a couple of extra views, the Package Explorer and Navigator View, and we'll briefly look at those. We'll also develop our first external tool to allow us to quickly navigate to any source file in the Explorer. This will work for Windows, but Mac and Linux users should be able to quickly adapt it to their operating systems. We'll finish up this module with a look at working sets.

Editing Code
Welcome to the Editing Code module of the Eclipse Guided Tour. My name is Tod Gentille. We're going to dig into the text editor in this module and look at multiple ways that Eclipse can improve your productivity. We'll start with the Editor View itself and look at some of the options for customizing the layout of that view. Then we'll talk about Eclipse's Content Assist feature. If you've ever used Visual Studio, Content Assist is similar to the IntelliSense feature of Visual Studio. In addition to Content Assist features, both the JDT and the CDT will do real time code analysis for you. Code analysis will find most of your compiler errors and even some legitimate, but suspect code before you ever build your project. Sometimes code analysis might have different ideas about valid code than you, so we'll look at how to bend it to your will. We'll dig into the Editor Preferences pane. We'll also take a look at a feature that under certain circumstances is extremely useful, but easy to forget about, Block Editing Mode. In the Editor View, we'll start with editor tabs, how to move tabs around and tile the editor into various configurations. We'll also examine the double-clicking behavior of a tab and how the layout configuration affects that behavior. We'll finish up with what happens when you have too many editor tabs for a given editing pane. We'll then look at the Code Folding Region and Marker Bar Regions of the editor. Inside the Marker Bar we'll look at three functional areas: Tasks, bookmarks, and breakpoints. We'll finish up the Editor view with the highlighting that happens in the Marker Bar and a unique feature of Eclipse, Show Source of Selected Element Only.

Customizing Eclipse
Welcome to the Customizing Eclipse module of the Eclipse Guided Tour. My name is Tod Gentille. We're going to look at some common ways you can customize Eclipse to suit your working style. We'll start with a look at the major operations you can perform on perspectives, and we'll examine the various ways you can customize the toolbar. We'll also look briefly at the closely related menu customization. Then we'll look more in depth at keyboard shortcuts. We've already assigned a couple of shortcuts, but we'll look at all the details of the process and the various options that are available. We'll explore some of the additional views that are available in Eclipse and look at a couple that you might find useful. Finally we'll look at the facilities for importing and exporting your settings so you can take your customizations along to a new machine or a new version of Eclipse. There are five major operations you can perform on a perspective. You can modify an existing perspective, add a new perspective, switch among perspectives, reset a perspective to its initial state, and finally you can delete a perspective. Let's go to a demo and look at these operations.

Code Navigation
Welcome to the Code Navigation module of the Eclipse Guided Tour. My name is Tod Gentille. There are many, many ways you can navigate around your code in Eclipse. Many are common to the JDT and CDT, but of course there are some that are unique to each platform. I've broken Code Navigation up into two modules. In this module we'll cover the basic code navigation techniques that I think you'll find useful in your daily work. In the next module we'll look at some more advanced techniques. We'll start with a look a the navigation menu and navigating to resources from the Project Explorer and similar views. The navigation menu is context aware, so the options will change based on what portion of Eclipse has the current focus. We'll look at both navigating to resources, which lets us see where resources reside on the project, and the ability to directly open a resource by name. One of my favorite features of Eclipse is how hovering is implemented. We'll look at how that works and how to customize it. There are two very similar outline windows in Eclipse, the Outline view, which is a dockable window, and the Quick Outline view, which is a pop-up window. We'll see how to use both of these and look at navigating, filtering, sorting, and the moving capabilities of both those views. We'll also look at the very useful capabilities of navigating with the Editor History. Navigation can also be done by annotation, so we'll also see how that is done and how to customize it. The JDT has a Breadcrumb feature that lets us both see where we are and allows us to navigate to almost anywhere else in the current project. Since C++ has both Header and Source files, a very useful feature of the CDT allows us to jump back and forth between two related files. Let's go over to Eclipse and get started with a demo.

Advanced Navigation and Searching
Welcome to the Advanced Navigation and Searching module of the Eclipse Guided Tour. My name is Tod Gentille. We're going to continue with our look at various code navigation features offered by Eclipse. We'll start with a recap of some very useful navigation features that showed up in earlier modules, but didn't get expressly mentioned in Part I. We'll then look at the multiple offerings for searching your code including techniques for searching a single file, multiple files, and even one for files that aren't part of your workspace. And if you've been wondering about the bar on the right side of the Editor, we're finally going to highlight and explain the purpose of the Overview Ruler. We'll sum up with a look at how you can quickly jump to any build errors or warnings in your code to correct them. We've already mentioned the Call and Type hierarchies a couple of times in other examples including the module on keyboard shortcuts, but the Call hierarchy in particular is one I use extensively, so I thought it was worth at least another brief mention in this module, especially since I haven't mentioned that you can control click your way through the hierarchy. We've talked about bookmarks and tasks, but did you know you can create them at the file level also? We'll finish up this topic with a visit back to the Navigate menu. This time we'll take a look at the Open From Clipboard and Show In features. Let's switch over to Eclipse for a demo.