Enterprise Campus Design for CCDA DESGN (200-310)

This course will teach a number of different layer 1 and layer 2 technologies that are commonly implemented on the Campus LAN including physical connectors and cabling, spanning-tree, VLANs, Switch Stacking and Cisco's Virtual Switching System.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 20, 2017
Duration
2h 51m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 20, 2017
Duration
2h 51m
Description

Many engineers work their whole careers without ever really looking under the hood to understand why a network was designed the way it was. Some of this is because their day to day duties don't require this knowledge and some of this is because an engineer chooses to focus their knowledge on becoming exceptional operational engineers. In this course, Enterprise Campus Design for CCDA DESGN (200-310), you'll take a closer look at the Campus LAN, specifically covering the layer 1 and layer 2 technologies and features that are commonly implemented and how and why they are placed onto the LAN to perform a specific function within the overall network design. First, you'll start out with two modules that cover the common layer 1 and layer 2 concepts, features and technologies; this includes everything from cabling connectors and cables to spanning tree and VLANs. Next, you'll focus on the design recommendations for the items covered before and you'll extend that coverage into high availability and how these different technologies and features improve on those covered previously as well as covers the design recommendations for them. Finally, you'll finish it out with a review of the different Quality of Service (QoS) technologies that are commonly used on the Campus LAN. When you are finished with this course, you'll have the skills and knowledge of most of the Campus LAN technologies, features and recommendations that would be commonly used in designing an enterprise Campus LAN.

About the author
About the author

Sean Wilkins is an accomplished networking consultant and writer for infoDispersion (www.infodispersion.com) who has been in the IT field for over 20 years working with several large enterprises.

More from the author
Protocol Deep Dive: EIGRP
Intermediate
3h 46m
Feb 5, 2019
Security in the Cloud
Beginner
1h 2m
Apr 26, 2018
More courses by Sean Wilkins
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Welcome to Pluralsight. My name is Sean Wilkins and I am a network engineer, author, and technical editor at infoDispersion. I'm excited to welcome you to my course, Enterprise Campus Design for CCDA DESGN. This course is one of many courses that are being introduced into the Pluralsight library to cover network design. While the network design topic generally can be thought of as rather dry to learn about, this course is structured to cover the topics at a pace that should keep the viewer's attention, while at the same time covering the topics' key points, including a running sample scenario enterprise. This course specifically is targeted on Campus LAN technologies, including some discussion about how they work, as well as how they can be fitted together to form a well-designed Campus LAN network. Some of the major topics that we will cover include Campus LAN physical technologies, including cabling and connector types, Campus LAN Layer 2 technologies like spanning tree and VLANs, Campus LAN high availability technologies like switch stacking and Cisco's Virtual Switching System, as well as Campus LAN QoS technologies. By the end of this course, you'll have a firm base of understanding about the available Layer 1 and Layer 2 technologies that are typically implemented on Campus LANs. You will also have a good understanding of how many of these different technologies can be implemented together to form a well-designed network from the axis through the core layers. Before beginning this course, you should be familiar with basic network functionality, including knowing the purpose and function of various common network elements like switches, routers, and firewalls. After viewing this course, you should feel comfortable diving into more detailed network design with courses on Campus Edge design, Enterprise Data Center Design, Enterprise IP Routing Design, and Enterprise IP and IPv6 Addressing Design. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn about network design with the Enterprise Campus Design for CCDA DESGN course, at Pluralsight.

Campus LAN Layer 2 Technologies
Hello everyone, and welcome to Enterprise Campus Design for CCDA DESGN. My name is Sean Wilkins, and this is the Campus LAN Layer 2 Technologies module. In this module we are going to be building onto the last module and discuss several of the Layer 2 technologies that are implemented on the campus LAN. Specifically, we will discuss the Spanning Tree Protocol, what it is, and how it is used on the LAN. We will then cover a number of different STP features referred to as the STP Toolkit. These features are used to extend and optimize the functionality of STP. We will then discuss the different STP versions that are available on modern equipment, including what their differences are and why you would use one over the other depending on the conditions of your network. Next we will add on to this list of STP centric features and discuss the Unidirectional Length Detection Protocol, or UDLD, including what it is and how it differs from other features. And finally, we will add a discussion about VLANs and VLAN trunking, and the various features that revolve around them. So now this all of this out of the way, let's get started.

Campus LAN Layered Recommendations
Hello everyone, and welcome to Enterprise Campus Design for CCDA Design. My name is Sean Wilkins, and this is the Campus LAN Layered Recommendations module. The purpose of this module is to bring together the material from the first two modules and offer recommendations as to how to use these different technologies according to Cisco's published best practices. This module has a simple organization as it will begin at the access layer recommendations, move up to the distribution layer recommendations, and then finally up to the core layer recommendations. It is important to note that since the material covered in the first two modules is mainly focused on Layer 1 and Layer 2 technologies, there will be more content coverage from those areas. The final section of this module will circle back to Globomantics and discuss how their network could be designed based on the material covered in the previous module and using the recommendations covered in this module. But now, with all of this out of the way, let's get started.

Campus LAN High Availability Design and Recommendations
Hello everyone, and welcome to Enterprise Campus Design for CCDA Design. My name is Sean Wilkins, and this is the Campus LAN High Availability Design and Recommendations module. This module will begin with a discussion and focus it on the different protocols and features that are used on the campus LAN that provide the ability to maintain the uptime of both individual network elements and the network generally. This module is intended to be stacked on top of the information covered in the previous modules. There are a number of subjects that we will cover including switch link redundancy, redundancy models, EtherChannel, switch stacking, switch supervisor redundancy, first hop redundancy, and finally a section on Cisco's Virtual Switching System. This module will finish up with a section on a number of recommendations related to the covered high availability features and on the continued Globomantics case study. So now with all this out of the way, let's get started.

Campus LAN QoS Technologies
Hello everyone, and welcome to Enterprise Campus Design for CCDA Design. My name is Sean Wilkins, and this is the Campus LAN QoS Technologies module. This module will discuss the different technologies and tools that are used to implement different classes of traffic on the network. These are then used to ensure that high-priority traffic gets the fastest path through the network. In networking, this was referred to as implementing quality of service. There are a number of different topics that will be reviewed in this module. Some of these topics include traffic characteristics, quality of service models, trust boundaries, classification and marking, traffic policing and markdown, congestion management and avoidance, traffic shaping, and finally, link efficiency. While the depth of these topics will be light, it is important for any aspiring network designer to understand how quality is ensured through the network and the tools that can be used. So now, with all this out of the way, let's get started.