Stylized Animal Modeling for Games

This course will get you familiar with sculpting a stylized animal using Zbrush that you can apply to any animal modeling project.
Course info
Rating
(11)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 3, 2017
Duration
4h 10m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Gathering Reference and Blocking in the Base of the Animal
Refining in the Animal Base
Creating the Fur
Creating the Saddle and Blanket
Creating the Chest Guard, Bags, and Accessories
Final Polish and Details
Description
Course info
Rating
(11)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 3, 2017
Duration
4h 10m
Description

Creating a believable, yet stylized animal is no easy task. In this course, Stylized Animal Modeling for Games, you'll be taken through all of the steps necessary to get you started on creating a stylized animal in Zbrush and a solid foundation for creating any animal in the future. You will start off by looking at the concept art and going over the importance of using anatomy reference to create believability even when creating a stylized sculpt. After that, you'll learn how to block out the base mesh, which is created by separating the main forms of the animal into different parts. Then, you will build upon the base and refine the secondary shapes of the animal. Next, you will create accessories and armor for your animal using 3DS Max and Zbrush. Finally, you will add the final polish and details to your sculpt. When you're finished with this sculpting course, you'll not only know the process for creating stylized animals in Zbrush but, also be able to apply the same techniques you've learned to any animal you create in the future. Software required: Zbrush 4R7, 3DS Max 2013 and up.

About the author
About the author

Micah is a 3D character artist based in Texas. While growing up, Micah discovered her love for 3D art after watching movies like Shrek and playing a variety of games. When she discovered the world of game development and found that she can bring characters to life, she was hooked and has never looked back since. Micah currently works as a freelance 3D character artist creating characters and creatures for video games.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone! My name is Micah Masbaum, and welcome to my course, Stylized Animal Modeling for Games. I'm a freelance character artist. Creating a stylized animal that looks believable can be challenging, but with the right methods, it can be a very rewarding process. Throughout this course, we'll create a warthog and a saddle using ZBrush and 3ds Max. Some of the major topics that we'll cover include going over the important of reference images, blocking out the base mesh, building on the base and refining the secondary shapes, creating armor and accessories, and finally adding polish and details. By the end of this course, you'll have a solid foundation for sculpting stylized animals for games. Before beginning this course, you should be familiar with ZBrush and 3ds Max. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn the process of creating stylized animals with the Stylized Animal Modeling for Games course at Pluralsight.

Gathering Reference and Blocking in the Base of the Animal
Hi everyone, and welcome to Stylized Animal Modeling for Games. In the first module, we'll start off by taking a look at our concept art and going over the importance of reference. Throughout the rest of the lessons, we'll focus on blocking out the base shape of the animal. The main things we want to keep in mind while sculpting is to not spend too much time on one area. Sometimes changing one part will reveal issues in another. So fix things as you go. Also, keep main parts separated so we can easily make edits later on. We also want to make sure to keep our resolution low because we're just focusing on making big shapes at this point. And we also want to try and experiment. It's always a good idea to try new things and not be afraid to start something over. Alright, now we'll start by looking at our concept art and our references.