Baking Light Maps for Game Environments in Maya and mental ray

In this tutorial, you will learn about baking light maps and compositing them for game environments. Software required: Maya 2011, Photoshop CS5.
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Nov 1, 2012
Duration
1h 43m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Nov 1, 2012
Duration
1h 43m
Description

In this tutorial, you will learn about baking light maps and compositing them for game environments. You will learn to generate light maps for any project's environment, or bake ambient occlusion into our geometry. We will learn how to gain more control over the color and quality of our lighting by rendering in passes, compositing them, and making tweaks by hand as we go. Then we will be able to see our lighting in Maya's real-time display, rotate it at 360 degrees and view it at every angle fast and easy.

About the author
About the author

A. Gabriel Betancourt began working in the computer graphics industry over nine years ago and has contributed his experience and talents to games, music videos, and commercials.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
Hi, my name is Gabriel Betancourt. I was a senior lighting artist in video games for various triple A titles, such as Sony's Lair, Tomb Raider, Call of Duty: World at War, and Call of Duty: Black Ops. We're going to be using Maya, Mental Ray, and Photoshop CS5 to create renders, make light maps, then composite them to preview in Maya's real time display. From this course, you'll learn how to generate light maps for any game project, to simulate the sun and shadows that bring out details in your work. Then you'll apply them to your environment or prop models as textures. Game engines and graphics cards are limited in their power to render graphics in real time. Lighting can hog up a lot of processing. To work around this, we'll be pre-calculating bounce light on surfaces, and save them as textures. I hope you enjoy the lesson, and that you're able to make the most of it for every project you work on.