Creating a Victorian Style Gown with Marvelous Designer

Being able to produce high quality 3D models in Marvelous Designer can be a huge advantage and time saver on your projects. This course will help you discover all the obvious and the less obvious techniques of creating garments and accessories.
Course info
Rating
(12)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 9, 2017
Duration
2h 49m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(12)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 9, 2017
Duration
2h 49m
Description

Marvelous Designer is a software in which you can easily start making your own fabrics right away. However, those initial models may look good but are far from reaching the full potential of the software. In this course, Creating a Victorian Style Gown with Marvelous Designer, you'll learn the important tools and workflow that come in handy when making multi-layered clothing, along with the more complex tools introduced in the new Marvelous Designer update. First, you'll discover how to import your own avatars. Next, you'll dive into pattern creation for your outfits. Finally, you'll explore how to create your own accessories. By the end of the course, you'll have a better understanding of the capabilities of Marvelous Designer, and be able to confidently tackle all sorts of garments. Software required: Marvelous Designer 6.5.

About the author
About the author

Born and raised in Maribor, Slovenia, her journey started as a freelancer, working mostly on high profile projects in graphic design. Now she is working for a Slovenian based company Visual Development, where her responsibilities include concept development, artistic vision, and 3D fabric creation.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Natalija, and welcome to my course, Creating a Victorian Style Gown with Marvelous Designer. I'm a graphic designer and 3D artist at Visual Development. Marvelous Designer is a software that can really support your workflow and help you achieve quality results in no time. An easy garment can be simulated in a matter of minutes, and elevating that garment to a more complex one can be, with the knowledge of the right tools and techniques, just as easy. In this course, we're going to take pattern-making and sewing to the next step, and really construct an outfit with a clear vision in mind, putting wrinkles, tighter areas or looser areas, in the exact places we want, and not just relying on the simulation to do the work for us. Some of the major topics that we will cover include importing your own avatars, pattern creation for outfits, and creating fabricated accessories. By the end of this course, you should be familiar with creating patterns for typical outfits, and being able to manipulate the fabric through particle distance, fabric details, settings and tools, to give the final outcome the look and feel that you want. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn Marvelous Designer with the Creating a Victorian Style Gown with Marvelous Designer course, at Pluralsight.

Creating the Corset
Corsets have been a popular item of clothing since the 16th century, reaching its peak in the Victorian era. They were worn by both women and men, and used to change the appearance of their bodies, hence making their waist smaller. Usually it was worn as an undergarment, but occasionally has been used as an outergarment as well. Its shape has changed a bit throughout the years, first being in the shape of an inverted cone, and later adapting to the hourglass shape, as shown on the picture. Strips of whalebone was inserted up the back, and sometimes down the sides and front to give it structure. They needed to be rigid to conceal the layers of underwear which were worn underneath. The lacing could be done either in the front or the back of the corset. Now that we already have the shirt-making part behind us, and we have gone through all the tools for creating patterns, we can already see that creating the shape won't be too difficult. The only thing that can produce an issue is the lacing in the back. We could lace the corset the same way it was done in real life, so taking a string of fabric, making it very stiff, and lacing throughout the holes with the help of pins and under simulation. Since I've tried that, I've noticed that the strip of fabric can easily get pulled too much, resulting in simulation mistakes and the end result is not that good, so instead we will opt for a quicker approach that will produce less mistakes, and actually a better visual result. So I suggest we just get started.