Maya Rendering Nodes Reference Library: General Utilities

In this course we will discuss Maya's General Utility Hypershade nodes.
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Dec 24, 2009
Duration
1h 59m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Advanced
Updated
Dec 24, 2009
Duration
1h 59m
Description

We will be discussing topics such as using the bump 2D and bump 3D nodes in order to create bump-mapping effects, using the condition node to create dynamically-changing shading networks, using the array mapper node to shade particles, using the sampler info node to create complex shading effects, just to name a few of the nodes we'll be exploring. Software required: Maya (all versions.)

About the author
About the author

Kyle was one of the first authors for Digital-Tutors (now a Pluralsight company) and has been a part of the team for over 10 years. Kyle began his career in computer graphics education as a college instructor and worked as a Digital-Tutors rendering tutor and curriculum manager since 2002.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
[Autogenerated] in this lesson will explore the ary map or hyper shape note. So in the hyper shade, the brain mapper is found at the very first entry of the general utilities. Now this is a array, or rather and no, that's normally used to create per particle shading attributes. So normally we actually don't have to manually add this in through the hyper shade. This note will normally be created for us automatically whenever we are creating some kind of perp article shading attributes. So what I'll go ahead and do to illustrate this is will jump into the dynamics menu. Look up two particles and we'll make a new particle emitter. So that way, as I go through and play this, we can start to see some particles being emitted if I need to. We can actually expanded timeline to make this a little bit longer, that we start to get some particles in here. Now let's go and create some perp article shading attributes, which will create the array mapper note for us. So let's elect this particle clown Press control. Eight. Open up the attributes. We'll take a look inside the particle shape node, and if you scroll all the way down. We have some perp article array attributes. So what if we actually wanted these particles to be colored based on their age? So that way they start at one color, and then as they start to travel away and get older and older, they will actually change their color. We can do that by adding some kind of a color attributes will click on color, will add a perp article color attribute wouldn't add this. And now we can see we have an RGB per particle command that's been added for us. So now if we right click in this area will create a new ramp, all right, that will go ahead and make the array mapper note for us, and we'll connect the out per particle attribute to a ramp that access this ramp. Well, we have to do is just right. Click on this RGB per particle attributes, right? Click and edit ramp. Now, if we were to go ahead and play this back, we should start to see a little bit of coloration that will begin to happen here. So if I press these six key on my keyboard, we can actually see that, So you'll notice we played us through and we start to have some particles. Now the particles are starting to disappear much, much faster. That's because whenever we add this perp article attribute, it will go ahead and set the life span to basically one second. So by the time we reach 30 frames, these particles will start to disappear. So let's make this a little bit longer in duration. Will set the lifespan to three seconds. Well, go ahead and let this play the play through. And now we can see that these particles are actually changing color as they age. We'll make this a little bit easier to see what set the particle render type to something like a sphere. Here we go. If we need to weaken. Ah, go ahead and had some attributes for the current render type and I'll start to dial this radius down. Just that it's a little bit easier to see, all right. And now we have these individual particles that are being shaded according to their age. And if we were to go ahead and select these particles and in the hyper shade, go ahead and take a look at the input and output connections of our selection. You can see the array mapper note has been automatically created for us, and it takes the color input from this ramp and then uses that to shade these particles based on their age. So if I wanted to actually come in and change the color of these particles So the position zero, which in my case, is the Red Slider This is going to really conform to the particles at their age of zero, basically, when they're born and as we start travel little bit further out to one, this is the basic endpoint of any particles life. So we could maybe come in here and shake these a little bit differently. So maybe if we wanted these to be nice and right as they're born and then as they start to get older, they fade into a little bit darker or engine and finally in the black. You know, if we were to go through and play this, we can see that is exactly what we get. And we could also start to add other per particle attributes for things like opacity. So if we were to add a new dynamic at tribute for opacity. Again, we can add a new per particle attributes at this. And now we have opacity per particle. Right quick, we'll make a new ramp. And to see this just right click on this newly created a tribute and edit Ram. And so now we can see that based on opacity will now have the white areas that are going to be fully opaque. And as we start to travel outward, we start to get more and more opacity all right and again, this will automatically create the poor particle attribute for us. Now, whenever we render this. If we were to render this using something like a simple hardware render and render this out, we can actually see that this particle attribute does carry through just fine. Now we will run into a situation if we raising some kind of software rendered particles so far to switch the render attributes to some kind of a software based particle. Either the blobby cloud or the tube. You'll notice the blobby surfaces. They do look just fine here, the view port. But if I were to go back to, let's say, the Maya software and try to rented this, they'll actually render completely gray. All right, So in order to render these properly will have to take advantage of an extra node called the Particle Sampler note. So if you want to learn more about that, you can refer to our lesson on dealing with the particle sampler node. That's a look at how we can use theory mapper to create per particle color attributes for our particles.