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Designing a Site Recovery Strategy on Microsoft Azure

Microsoft Azure Site Recovery is essential for your business continuity strategies. This course will guide you through the design considerations you should keep in mind when planning to deploy Azure Site Recovery.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Sep 5, 2018
Duration
1h 57m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Sep 5, 2018
Duration
1h 57m
Description

Utilizing the Microsoft Azure platform is key to having efficient business continuity strategies by designing and deploying Azure Site Recovery. In this course, Designing a Site Recovery Strategy on Microsoft Azure, you'll learn how to design and implement a Site Recovery solution using the Microsoft Azure platform. First, you'll explore some common replication scenarios and how to determine storage, networking, and capacity planning requirements. Next, you'll discover how to enable replication for physical and virtual machines. Finally, you'll delve into performing failover and failback operations to enable business continuity. By the end of this course, you'll have the necessary knowledge to efficiently design and implement your own Site Recovery and business continuity strategy utilizing the Microsoft Azure platform.

About the author
About the author

Mike Pfeiffer is a twenty year IT industry veteran, published author, and international conference speaker.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hey everyone. This is Mike Pfeiffer and welcome to Designing a Site Recovery Strategy on Microsoft Azure. In this course we'll take a look at the design considerations you should keep in mind when planning to deploy Azure site recovery. To get started we'll take a look at defining your site recovery goals and we'll explore the basics of the site recovery service, and then we'll discuss the various options you have when it comes to protecting physical servers, as well as VMware and Hyper-V virtual machines. Next, we'll move onto designing your site recovery infrastructure, and you'll learn about the components you need to deploy in order to enable site recovery for your own organization. Throughout the rest of the course we'll take a look at the various operating systems and workloads that you can replicate and migrate to Azure using the site recovery service, and then we'll dive into the considerations that you need to keep in mind when it comes to designing a site failover strategy with Microsoft Azure. So if you're brand new to Azure site recovery, and you need to start designing your own disaster recovery and business continuity strategy with Microsoft Azure this course is definitely for you.

Defining Site Recovery Goals
Hey, what's up everybody? It's Mike Pfeiffer, and welcome to Pluralsight. In this course we're going to be taking a look at designing a site recovery strategy on Microsoft Azure and I know that you're busy, so we're going to dive right into the first module, Defining Site Recovery Goals. So let's go ahead and talk about what we're going to cover in this module. So to kick things off we're going to dive right in and talk about how the site recovery service works, so we'll explore some of the different components within the service and give you a good idea of how this works and how you can utilize it moving forward. Next up, we'll dive into all the different replication options. How do you replicate virtual machines between regions and Azure? How to you replicate VMware, Hyper-V, and physical servers into Azure or between sites that you have in your existing on-premises environment? How do you leverage your existing high availability and disaster recovery options within workloads that you're already running now, like Active Directory and SQL Server? And then when it comes to planning all this stuff, and understanding the bandwidth, and the consumption, and the performance, how do you figure all that out? So we'll take a look at the ASR, the Azure Site Recovery service Deployment Planner, so you get an idea of how to use that tool to plan your deployments. At the end of this module we'll take a look at creating a Recovery Services vault, which is the key component, the resource that you need in Azure to make all of this stuff work. So that's the game plan for this module, and as we move through the course we're going to give you a clear picture on the architectural patterns and practices that you need to implement in order to make the most out of the Azure Site Recovery Services with your own solutions.

Designing Site Recovery Infrastructure
In this module we're going to take a look at Designing Site Recovery Infrastructure, so we're going to see what components we actually need to deploy and take a closer look at those components in order to support the Azure Site Recovery Service, and let's talk a little bit about what we're going to cover in this module. So to kick things off, we're going to do an overview of the Site Recovery infrastructure components, so depending on the scenario, whether we're doing VMware, or Hyper-Virtual, or physical servers what infrastructure specifically needs to be deployed, so we'll take a closer look at that. Next up, we'll take a look at capacity planning considerations because, like we've discussed, we've got configuration servers and process servers, and we need to understand how much CPU and memory and how much storage those things are going to need, so we'll take a look at that. From there we'll see a practical example of registering some server infrastructure with the recovery vault, and so in this specific scenario we're going to take a look at adding a Hyper-V server to the vault, and when it comes to replicating virtual machines from any platform, whether it's Hyper-V, or VMware, or even physical servers, we're going to have this concept of replication policies. So we'll take a look at how those work, and then finally, at the end of the module we'll see a practical example of enabling virtual machine protection, so we'll see how we replicate a Hyper-V virtual machine into Azure that we can ultimately bring online during a disaster recovery event. So that's the game plan for this module. Let's go ahead and move on to the next video, and we'll get started.

Identifying Site Recovery Resources
In this module we're going to take a look at Identifying Site Recovery Resources. So we're really going to be focusing on which virtual machine types are supported, which operating systems are supported, which hypervisor operating systems are supported, and what are some of the other requirements to think about. So to kick things off, we're going to take a look at how we identify supported regions within the Azure platform because the reality is Microsoft is constantly adding new infrastructure to the global footprint that supports Azure, and sometimes a region is too new to actually support Site Recovery, so we're going to take a look and see how we can actually determine if a region is supported. Next up, we'll take a look at the replication requirements for Azure virtual machines, VMware virtual machines, and physical servers, as well as Hyper-V. What are the requirements there, what do we need to think about when we design these solutions? We'll take a look at identifying the supported host virtualization servers and the virtual machine operating systems, so which OS versions are supported, and which ones can we use when we set up Site Recovery, and then finally, we'll identify the supported workloads that we can deploy within Azure. So we're going to see the virtual machine operating system types that we can use, but also the workloads like Active Directory, SQL Server, what are the things that we need to think about there, and which ones have been tested by Microsoft? So that's the game plan for this module. Let's go ahead and move over to the next video and we'll get started.

Designing Site Failover Strategy
In this module we're going to take a look at Designing a Site Failover Strategy and really some of the considerations you need to keep in mind. What do you need to think about as you're designing a site failover strategy with the Azure Site Recovery Service? So let's take a look at the points that we're going to cover throughout this module. So to kick things off we're going to be taking a look at running a disaster recovery drill into Azure because you really, obviously, want to test this stuff out before you start depending on it. You want to make sure that it works exactly the way that you expect it to, so the first thing we're going to do is do a disaster recovery test and test the failover before we decide that this thing is ready for production. Next, we're going to take a look at creating a recovery plan. This is something that we haven't dove into yet, but this is a great way for you to basically failover groups of servers, so if you have multiple groups of servers powering your application how would you bring those online all at the same time or how would you orchestrate the order in which all those servers are brought online, so we'll take a look at how we create the recovery plan, and then next up we're going to take a look at actually adding automation scripts to the recovery plan, so we can run scripts before or after different things happen when we're activating the servers or bringing the servers online as a failover or migration part of the process, so the scripts are a way for us to automate routine tasks as part of that execution. We'll talk about the various ways that you can actually perform a failover to Azure, and we'll see the controls scenario like a true disaster recovery test or a true migration, and we'll also see the concept of how you failback from Azure after you've done a disaster recovery drill, and set everything up in Azure, and how do you failback to on-premises after that process is complete? so that's the game plan for this module. Let's go ahead and jump over to the next video. We'll look at running a disaster recovery drill to Azure.