NUKE Channel Fundamentals

Channel nodes and their operations is the cornerstone to understanding NUKE and the core of compositing. This course will peel back the veneer and demystify the way NUKE operates on channels and understand how, why and when to implement these nodes.
Course info
Rating
(13)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 8, 2017
Duration
2h 28m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(13)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 8, 2017
Duration
2h 28m
Description

Have you ever struggled with compositing, not knowing what node to use or how to achieve a more elegant solution? If so, NUKE Channel Fundamentals is the perfect course for you because you will learn how these nodes are the building blocks to everything you do in compositing. First, you will learn how channels construct images and how they can be moved around. Next, you will see how easy it is to perform simple operations on channel sets to easily create new ways of using channels. Finally, you will take these concepts into a full production shot and implement them into creating a photorealistic composite. When you’re finished, you will have gained the knowledge and completed a channel based composite and you’ll have the skills and confidence to implement these simple nodes into your everyday workflows. Software required: NUKE.

About the author
About the author

Daniel L Smith is an award winning compositor, director, and vfx supervisor with over 25 years of experience. Daniel is a Foundry Certified Trainer in NUKE and has personally trained hundreds of students that now have successful careers in the industry.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Daniel Smith, and welcome to my course, Nuke Channel Fundamentals. I'm a VFX instructor and compositing supervisor with over 25 years of experience. This course is a major building block of your understanding on how to implement better workflows and better compositing in Nuke. You will become a power user from understanding these simple building blocks. Some of the major topics that we will cover include exploring how channels store pixel data. Images are constructed from pixels. Knowing what each channel is and how you can use them empowers you for great compositing. Understanding common uses for each channel. The channel nodes let you modify, rearrange, move, and copy channels in any way you need. Apply techniques to optimize workflows and scripts. We're going to look at ways to store channels and optimize them to decrease render times and storage. To create a composite project, we're going to take the knowledge we gain during this course and apply it to the helicopter shot, compositing with newfound efficiency. By the end of this course, you'll know how Nuke uses channels to represent and edit your images to make better composites. Before the beginning of this course, you should be familiar with the basics of Nuke compositing. Check out the beginning learning path courses on Nuke here at Pluralsight. From here, you should feel comfortable diving into channel manipulations with courses on color-based extraction keying, combining mattes, even advanced visual effects compositing. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn Nuke's channel nodes, with the Nuke Channel Fundamentals course, at Pluralsight.

Channel Fundamentals
Hello. Welcome to the Nuke Channel Fundamentals course. This is Channel Fundamentals and I am Daniel Smith. I'm a visual effects compositing supervisor, as well as a teacher and trainer for Nuke. Channel nodes and their operations are the cornerstone to understanding Nuke and the core of compositing. No other nodes are so useful and simultaneously the most misunderstood. We will peel back the veneer and demystify the way Nuke operates on its channels, and understood the how, why, and when to implement them to create better work. Channels are the very building block of all images. All images are made out of channels. Each color channel is a representation of the light that a surface receives. Each alpha channel represents the occlusion of light. Each channel can be rearranged, manipulated, and utilized elsewhere in the composite. Channels can be used in infinite ways. The possibilities are everywhere.

Channel Nodes Reference
Welcome to the Channel Node Reference. We are going to be taking a look at all the different nodes that make up how you manipulate channels in Nuke. This reference guide will be a handy utility to quickly look up the functions and the interface of each node in the channel section. Each clip will be broken down into the different channel nodes. We will be looking at the Shuffle node, the ShuffleCopy. Then we will go into the Copy node, and then we'll round it out with both the AddChannels and RemoveChannels nodes. Let's jump over to our first one, the Shuffle.