Operational Support and Analysis for ITIL®

ITIL® is the world's foremost framework of IT Service Management. This course will help you increase your knowledge in areas of incident, problem, access, event, and request fulfillment processes.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 18, 2018
Duration
3h 57m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Reviewing Key Terms and Concepts of ITIL® Foundation and Service Operation
How the Process of Event Management Helps Us Know What’s Going On
Putting out Fires with Incident Management
Request Fulfillment
Problem Management - What Keeps This Disruption Occurring?
Letting People in or Keeping Them out - Access Management
ITSM’s One Stop Shop - The Service Desk
Know Your Role and Know Your Tools - OSA Functions, Roles, and Technology
Preparing for the ITIL® OSA Exam
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 18, 2018
Duration
3h 57m
Description

As an IT service provider, your company provides value to their customers in the form of services. In order to maintain that value, you must deliver services quickly and efficiently while maintaining normal service operations. In this course, Operational Support and Analysis for ITIL®, you'll learn intermediate level knowledge of how to properly support services to provide that value. First, you'll explore the processes of event, incident, and problem management. Next, you'll discover how request fulfillment helps alleviate the load on your Service Desk. Finally, you'll learn how to set up your Service Desk, as well as coordinate your technical management, IT operations management, and applications management functions. When you're finished with this course, you'll have the skills and knowledge of operational support and analysis for ITIL® needed to deliver and support services for your business, as well as tips on how to pass the related ITIL® intermediate exam.

About the author
About the author

Chris is a radio and television personality, IT and project management junkie, trainer, traveler, pastor, and professional.

More from the author
More courses by Chris Ward
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Chris Ward, and welcome to my course, the ITIL Intermediate capability module of Operational Support and Analysis. I am an IT trainer and consultant at Chris Ward, LLC, a project management professional, MCSE, and an ITIL expert. When delivering IT services in today's world, it is vitally important to have processes, tools, and people in place to maintain the day-to-day delivery of services to your customers. This course is an accredited course to help you gain knowledge about the operations and support side of IT service management according to ITIL, as well as prepare you for the ITIL Intermediate level exam for OSA. Some of the major topics that we will cover in this course include the primary areas of operations, support, infrastructure, and applications when delivering services with the processes of incident, problem, and access management; understanding the roles of people that own or manage the associated processes; technology considerations when implementing these processes; and, of course, how to study and prepare for the ITIL exam. By the end of this course, you'll know how understanding, supporting, and maintaining normal operations of a service will help create value to your business and customers. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the ITIL Foundation's content. In fact, you must be ITIL Foundation certified in order to take the ITIL Intermediate level exams. The good news is we have the ITIL Foundation's content here at Pluralsight. From here, you should feel comfortable diving deeper into ITIL with courses on Planning, Protection, and Optimization; Continual Service Improvement; and perhaps, ultimately, the Managing Across the Lifecyle course to prepare for ITIL Expert. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn IT service management and operations with the ITIL Operational Support and Analysis course here at Pluralsight.

How the Process of Event Management Helps Us Know What’s Going On
I remember walking into my first datacenter back in the day. It was I/O in the Phoenix metro area, racks of gleaming servers and storage area networks greeting my eyes, and do you want to know what one of my first thoughts was? How in the world do they keep track of all of what's happening here? Service providers spend quite a lot of money and time on supporting the operational services that they are offering, so you have to know what the status of the service is and infrastructure is at all times, especially when the status is unavailable or outside of normal service operations. Enter the world of Event Management. As we'll see, an event is any change of state that has significance for the management of an IT service or other configuration item. It typically requires IT personnel to take action, or at a minimum, to be logged. As we proceed with this course, you'll notice that in every module we'll focus on the purpose, objectives, and scope of the processes like Event Management, Incident Management, et cetera. It helps us prepare for the exam and recognizing the why we do these processes in certain scenarios that you might encounter. We'll look at the business value of this process, and then run through the policies, principles, and basic concepts of Event Management. One of the basic things we have in mind are the rule sets and correlation engines of Event Management. There are always triggers, inputs, and outputs for every one of the processes and Event Management is no different. And finally, we'll focus on the critical success factors, or CSFs, the key performance indicators, or KPIs, risks, and challenges of Event Management.

Putting out Fires with Incident Management
If I asked you what was the most visible process to customers, I bet almost all of you will say design coordination. I know, I'm joking of course. Almost all of you would probably say incident management, as its development was driven by the need to restore normal service operations to customers. Think about it. When you have a customer, whether internal or external, calling into the service desk to get their service running the way it's supposed to, how you get that fixed, resolved, escalated, will definitely affect customer satisfaction and value perception. One of the interesting things about incident management is that because of its high visibility, it is the process that receives the most funding and attention from senior management. But first let's define our terms. According to ITIL, an incident is the unplanned interruption to an IT service or reduction in the quality of an IT service, or the failure of a CI that has not yet impacted an IT service. The first part is pretty straightforward, but remember that ITIL will also treat a failing hard drive in a RAID array as an incident. Yeah, I know, it won't cause the service to have a reduction in operations, but it could be the first in a series of issues that cause a service outage or reduction in quality. So what are we going to cover in this module? Lots of positive things to help solve negative issues, that's what we're going to cover. We'll discuss the purpose, objectives, and scope of this awesome process. We'll touch on the business value of having incident management, even though I personally think most people get the idea why having a process that resolves incidents provides benefits to your organization. We'll cover the basic principles and concepts of incident management, along with the policies. Triggers, inputs, and outputs are also on the agenda, and finally, we'll look at the critical success factors, key performance indicators, risks, and challenges of incident management.

Request Fulfillment
Welcome everyone to Request Fulfillment as we continue our journey through the processes involved with OSA. Previously we talked about incidents and how they cause a disruption to those normal service operations that we want. Incidents are initially handled by the service desk typically, which is the single point of contact for our customers both external and internal, and with all those calls, emails, and/or chats coming in, how many are actual incidents versus service requests, which are just simple requests from a user for information, advice, access to an IT service, or a standard change. Because of the scale and frequency of these fairly simple and low-cost requests, it can require a specific tracking and response system, and it can also help alleviate any extra load on the change management process and incident management process. So as always, we're going to break down this process by looking at the purpose, objectives, and scope of request fulfillment, understanding what value it brings to your business, what are the policies, principles, and basic concepts of responding to requests, and don't forget our triggers, inputs, and outputs of the process, and we'll wrap up with our critical success factors, key performance indicators, risks, and challenges. First, let's go back and join Madison and Aaron with Wired Brain Coffee Software. In putting together the new processes for the service desk at Wired Brain Coffee Software Solutions, you have a meeting with Jeff, the service desk manager. He's pretty excited about putting in the new incident management process, but he does have one concern. With the introduction of the food truck market, the amount of calls that have come into the service desk for additional card readers has actually taken quite a bit of time from his team's ability to handle the incidents. The card readers are free of charge and easily acquired, but the amount of the calls are increasing. So what's the solution? That's when you realize that there needs to be a request fulfillment procedure to handle the standardized service requests.

Problem Management - What Keeps This Disruption Occurring?
If you're working in IT operations or at the service desk, one aspect that probably drives you bonkers are incidents that are the same, that keep happening again and again. A custom calls in and complains about a slowdown in his service or a broken link. Two hours later, the same call comes in. Then it's five people calling at the same time. What does it take to get this to stop? Well, that's where problem management comes in. Many times people will get this process confused with incident management, but it's so much more, because it deals with the root cause of incidents. As my grandfather used to say, get to the root of the problem, and the issues won't grow back. And since my grandfather worked on the Titan missile project back in the day, I'm sure he knew all about problem management. And in this module, we're going to once again look at the purpose, objectives, and scope of this process. We'll promote the value of this process for your organization, and of course cover the policies, principles, and basic concepts. All processes have them, and problem management is no different, triggers, inputs, and outputs, and of course the critical success factors, KPIs, risks, and challenges. For the OSA exam, it's vitally important to be able to discern the difference between performing problem management and incident management, as well as understanding how they work together. Make sure you understand when problem management is activated, and what it provides to your service desk and help desk personnel.

Letting People in or Keeping Them out - Access Management
How many times have you dealt with the calls to the service desk where someone says I can't access SharePoint, or why can't I upload a file to share, or I paid my money, but I'm unable to access these member-only parts of the site? Well 9 times out of 10, it has to deal with permission issues, and that's where access management as a process comes into play. We'll say it a few times in this module, but access management is all about following what your Information Security Policy has put into place for who gets access to what. It's another process, so that means another look at the purpose, objectives, and scope of access management. Security is a big deal these days, and so we will definitely see the benefits of having this process for your business. We'll catch up with the policies, principles, and basic concepts, while also looking at what triggers this process, what inputs and outputs are associated with it. And finally, we're going to close up shop with the critical success factors, KPIs, along with risks and challenges of access management.

ITSM’s One Stop Shop - The Service Desk
Here's where we start moving out of the processes for OSA and into the functions. Whether you call it a service desk, helpdesk, customer service operations hub, or whatever, in the ITIL framework, the service desk is the primary point or first line of contact for the end-user community as one ITSM group stated. I like to call it the one-stop shop for your customers and users, both internal and external to your organization. As we move to the functions, remember that ITIL refers to them as the logical grouping of roles and automated measures that execute on those processes that we've been discussing. We'll be looking at the primary functions like technical management, applications management, and IT operations, but here is where we dive into the service desk. Now just remember that the logical functions don't necessarily have to have the same name on the or chart breakdown. They are logical functions. So let's take a look, in this module, at the logical role of the service desk. We'll understand the objectives of having this function in place, while also looking at how we can organize your service desk. Because it is so visible to the end-user community, we will typically be doing quite a bit of performance measurements, and what happens if we can't afford or don't have the capability to do our own service desk? How do we successfully outsource this function? All that and more here in our first look at functions for OSA.

Know Your Role and Know Your Tools - OSA Functions, Roles, and Technology
I'm not sure how many of our amazing Pluralsight learners are familiar with Dwayne Johnson, AKA The Rock. He's now a pretty busy action in movies like Jumanji, the Fast and Furious series, and more, but when he was a professional wrestler, he would sometimes yell back to the crowd, know your role and shut your mouth. We of course would say that was a bit mean spirited, but of course he was just playing a part. However, the first part of that phrase is especially true when doing IT service management operation support, know your role. And of course we've already looked at the service desk, and now we look at the other functions that are a part of the service operation. We'll definitely be looking at several things in this last of the content-driven modules for Operational Support and Analysis. First, we'll look at the roles of technical management, applications management, and IT operations. Then, we'll look at some of the generic requirements you need to meet when it comes to technology in this sphere. Following that, we can learn how to evaluate that tech and some of the tools that might be used in performing the processes in OSA. And we'll look at projects when they're developed in the ITIL and IT service management world. What are some risks we need to avoid, while also attacking with best practices? There are always challenges and risks that are associated with OSA, and many elements of IT service management, so we'll finish up with a look at how to plan and implement improvements into our operations and the tech we use to do so. So much good stuff, so let's begin.

Preparing for the ITIL® OSA Exam
You've made your way through the material, and now it's time to start thinking about taking your exam. There are a few things that I'd like to share with you about what an intermediate exam is like, how to get signed up for the exam, and we'll walk through one of the sample questions that you have access to in your downloadable materials. Now if this isn't your first rodeo, or should I say your first intermediate ITIL exam, you can skip some of this material. However, I encourage you to at least make sure you're comfortable with everything you've covered over the last eight modules. Here, we're going to cover a few quick items, starting with the exam approach. If this is your first time taking an intermediate-level ITIL exam, this is very important to know. It's not like the foundation exam, or most certification exams for that matter either. We'll touch on the downloadable materials that you have access to and where to find them, talk about how to purchase your exam voucher, schedule your exam through PeopleCert, and finish with some last thoughts and tips. We'll also do that flyby of one of the exam questions. So, buckle your seatbelts, and put your seats and tray tables in their upright position, as we take off here in module nine.