PowerPoint 2010: Tables, Charts, Pictures, Audio, and Video

Part 2 of 3 in the PowerPoint 2010 series. This course is your PowerPoint encyclopedia for just about any feature you could possibly want.
Course info
Rating
(16)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 13, 2011
Duration
4h 3m
Table of contents
Inserting a Table
Formatting a Table
Adding Data to a Table
Copying an Excel Table into PowerPoint
Creating an Excel Spreadsheet in PowerPoint
Creating a Chart
Editing Chart Data
Changing the Chart Layout
Applying Chart Styles
Customizing Charts
Animating Charts
Adding a Chart Trendline
Creating a SmartArt Graphic
Adding Text and Images to a SmartArt Graphic
Adding or Deleting SmartArt Shapes
Formatting SmartArt
Animating SmartArt
Converting a Slide to SmartArt
Converting a SmartArt Graphic to Shapes
Saving SmartArt as a Picture
Inserting Pictures, Clip Art, and Screen Shots
Creating a Photo Album
Resizing, Scaling and Rotating Pictures
Cropping Pictures
Adjusting and Editing Pictures
Removing Picture Backgrounds
Applying Picture Effects
Compressing Picture Size
Inserting Clip Art Audio
Inserting Audio from Your Computer
Recording Your Own Audio
Playing and Pausing Audio
Adding and Removing Audio Bookmarks
Trimming Audio
Fading Audio
Adjusting Volume
Controlling When and How Audio Plays
Looping Audio
Audio Bookmarks and Triggers
Recording Your Own Audio Narration
Inserting Video
Cropping Video
Formatting Video
Trimming Video
Setting the Poster Frame
Compressing Video
Video Bookmarks and Triggers
Description
Course info
Rating
(16)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 13, 2011
Duration
4h 3m
Description

Part 2 of 3 in the PowerPoint 2010 series. Don't use PowerPoint that often? Well, you've probably forgotten how to do some stuff then. This course is your PowerPoint encyclopedia for just about any feature you could possibly want. Animations. YouTube videos. Charts. Transitions. Pictures. SmartArt. Tables and Spreadsheets. You name it, it's here. Feel free to skip around the course and watch the topics you are interested in. Oh, and for all of you ADHD learners, each clip is extra super short. I promise.

About the author
About the author

Heather Ackmann is an accomplished instructor with a decade of teaching experience, helping students at the high school, college, and adult levels in a variety of topics. Specializing in Microsoft Office computer applications, she is a Microsoft Office Certified Master and holds a degree in English and Secondary Education.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Adding a Chart Trendline
You're watching a lesson titled, Adding a Chart Trendline. To add a trendline to a bar chart in PowerPoint 2010, first, you'll need to select that chart. Next, jumping up to the Chart Tools Layout tab, in the Analysis group, you should see a menu that looks like this, that says Trendline. Clicking on that will reveal all of the different trendlines that you can create based on your chart series. There's Linear Trendline, Exponential Trendline, Linear Forecast Trendline, and Two Period Moving Average. For this particular chart, let's simply select Linear Trendline, and then PowerPoint will add that trendline to your chart. If you want to format a trendline, and glancing at this particular slide, that trendline is very thin and kind of hard to see, you do have the option of formatting this within PowerPoint. All you've got to do is take your mouse and click right on top of that trendline, and then jump over to your Chart Tools Format tab. From there, you can change the shape outline to a different color. In this case, I'm going to choose the darkest color in my color palette, and then I want to make the line thicker so I can. . . And then I can make the line thicker by going back to Shape Outline, down to Weight, and choosing, let's say, six points. In addition to changing the line color and thickness, you can also change the line itself. Going back to that Shape Outline drop down menu, let's say I wanted to make this an arrow pointing up. I can go all the way down to Arrows and choose my arrow style, too, to really emphasize what that trend looks. . . to really emphasize the direction of that trend. That is how you can create a trendline in PowerPoint 2010.

Creating a SmartArt Graphic
Creating a SmartArt Graphic. In this lesson we'll begin with a brief introduction to SmartArt and then learn how to create SmartArt in PowerPoint 2010. Introduction to SmartArt. SmartArt is a visual representation of information. There are many different types of SmartArt graphics. There are process diagrams, hierarchy diagrams, cycle diagrams, relationship diagrams and many other kinds of diagrams as well including pyramid, matrix and list.

Formatting SmartArt
You're watching the lesson titled, "Formatting SmartArt. " There are many tools available for formatting SmartArt in Power Point 2010. In this lesson, we'll be showing you the most popular ways to format SmartArt including how to apply SmartArt styles, how to resize SmartArt graphics and shapes, format individual shapes, change individual shapes, format SmartArt images, and last, how to reset the graphic. There's a lot to talk about, so let's get started.

Converting a Slide to SmartArt
You're watching a lesson, titled Converting a Slide to SmartArt. In the office etiquette presentation located in this lesson's folder, Slide 16 contains a simple Title and Contents slide with four bullet points. If we would like to make this slide a little more visual what we can do is convert these bullet points into SmartArt. To convert a bulleted list into SmartArt simply select the bullet points. I'm going to take my insertion point and click it right after the word Email and then click and drag over those bullet points, to select them. Next thing you can do is from your Home tab in the Paragraph group you should see an icon, that looks just like that. That is your Convert to SmartArt graphic button. Clicking on that will show you some popular SmartArt graphics. Or if you want to see the full grand master list you can click on the option More SmartArt Graphics. From there, you can pick a graphic and I am going to pick the Horizontal Picture List, and click OK. And that will convert our bullet point text. As you can see here: Person Visit, Phone Call, Letter and Email are now placed within the SmartArt graphic. And that is how you can quickly and easily convert a bullet point list into a SmartArt graphic.

Saving SmartArt as a Picture
You're watching a lesson titled Saving SmartArt as a Picture. If you'd like to save your SmartArt graphic as a picture file simply select the SmartArt graphic then right click with your mouse and choose the option Save as Picture. That'll open up the Save as Picture dialogue box allowing you to select the location of where you would like to save that picture to. Next, just give that file a name and then choose the file format that you'd like to save it as. By default PNG or Portable Network Graphics Format will be selected but you have other options. You can save it as GIF, a JPEG, TIF, or these other options. I'm just going to save it as JPEG and then click Save. Now I have a SmartArt graphic that has been converted to a picture file.

Resizing, Scaling and Rotating Pictures
You're watching the lesson titled Resizing, Scaling and Rotating Pictures. In this lesson we'll learn a few different ways to resize a picture in PowerPoint 2010 as well as how to adjust picture scaling and how to rotate pictures. Resizing a picture quickly. So jumping to slide six of the Office Etiquette presentation located in this lesson's exercise folder. We're going to play around with resizing this photograph. Now if the precise size of the photograph doesn't matter and you just want to eyeball how big you'd like your picture then the fastest way to resize images is to grab hold of one of the corner or side handlebars and then click and drag to resize the picture. If instead you'd like to maintain the picture's aspect ratio just use one of the corner handlebars. If you'd like to resize from the center of the photo hold down your Ctrl key while resizing. So you see if I grab hold of that handlebar how it kind of locks in that upper left hand corner but if I hold down my Ctrl key while clicking and dragging, look at how the photo goes from center. And that's the fast way to resize pictures however if the exact size does matter then you'd be better off using another method for resizing.

Adjusting and Editing Pictures
You're watching the lesson titled Adjusting and Editing Pictures. In this lesson we'll learn how to improve the appearance of a picture by making a picture softer, sharper, or brighter or by adjusting the picture's color or temperature. So, let's get started. Making a Picture Sharper, Softer, or Brighter So, opening up the Office Etiquette presentation located in this lesson's folder and jumping to slide six. We have a photo that could be improved just a little bit. In fact, if you notice around the hairline there's a little bit of a blur to this photo. So, selecting the picture and jumping over to the Picture Tools Format tab, in the Adjust group you'll find a drop-down menu for various corrections. At the very top you see options for making a picture softer, and hover your mouse over that will show you what that looks like on your slide. Or you can make an image sharper. I'm going to select the option Sharpen by 25% which doesn't make it perfect, but it does kind of improve the image just a little bit, making the edges a little bit crisper. Likewise, you can also adjust the picture brightness by going right back to that Corrections drop-down menu and choosing any one of the options to adjust both brightness and contrast of a photo. What's really great about PowerPoint 2010 is that you get to see previews of what that picture will look like within the menu itself. I'm going to select the one with Brightness 0, Contrast -20%.

Fading Audio
You're watching the lesson titled Fading Audio. Fading Audio is a brand-new feature in PowerPoint 2010 and not all audio types can be faded. For example, in this exercise file in this lesson's folder I have two audio files here. I've got a MIDI File and a WAV File. And if we select the MIDI File and go up to our Audio Tools Playback tab notice in the editing group how the Fade In and Fade Out options are shaded light grey. That's because you can't fade in and fade out particular file types like the MIDI File. However, a WAV File you can fade in and fade out. So, depending on the kind of audio you have inserted into your PowerPoint 2010, that will determine your ability on whether or not you can fade in or fade out that audio. But if you can fade in, if these little buttons are bright and you can select them, fading is really, really simple. So, right now this audio, if I play it, (audio playing) starts off with a bang. If I want that to gradually fade in over five seconds what I can do is take my mouse and click this up to five seconds or simply type in the number five. And now when I press Play on the audio you can hear it gradually fade in over five seconds. (audio fading in) And that's fading audio in. Likewise you can also fade audio out in the same way. Just bump it up a few seconds and now, when the file reaches the end of that audio you can hear it slowly fade out. And that is how you can fade audio in and out in PowerPoint 2010.

Controlling When and How Audio Plays
You're watching the lesson titled, "Controlling When and How Audio Plays. " PowerPoint 2010 comes packed with a lot of new options for how you can control when and how sound plays during your presentation. In this lesson, we'll learn how to play an audio file on the click of a mouse, how to play an audio file automatically or across slides, and then we'll learn how to edit some more advanced audio effect options and how to play audio through what's known as a trigger. So let's get started.

Inserting Video
You're watching the lesson titled, Inserting Video. In this lesson, we'll begin by discussing the Compatible Video Formats that you'll be able to insert and play in PowerPoint 2010. Next, we'll learn how to insert a video file from your computer, how to insert and play video from websites such as YouTube, and how to insert animated clip art. Compatible Video Formats in PowerPoint 2010 You have several Compatible Video Formats with which to choose in PowerPoint 2010. There's the Adobe Flash Media file format, the Windows Media and Video files, otherwise known as. asf and. avi files, and you can also use. mpeg or. wmv files. Just keep in mind that PowerPoint 2010 relies on third-party codecs in order to play and decode a lot of the previously-mention formats. So, if you have trouble playing a video in PowerPoint, you might require additional players or codecs to be installed on your computer and/or the computer you plan on using during the presentation. Also keep in mind that if you suspect that the video format you are using is the reason PowerPoint is unable to play the video, try converting your video to the. wmv file. PowerPoint just loves. wmv files. And even though other video formats are technically compatible,. wmv is the fool-proof video format to use.

Cropping Video
You're watching the lesson titled Cropping Video. Just like pictures, you can crop video in PowerPoint 2010. To crop a video, simply take your mouse, select the video file, and then jump to the Video Tools Format tab. In the Size group you'll see the exact same cropping button that you're familiar with images. Clicking the Crop button will turn on the cropping points surrounding your video frame. Then all you've got to do is hover your mouse over one of those cropping points, click and drag your mouse in to crop a portion of the video. So I'm going to crop the top frame here. And down below I really don't want to see my Task Bar in the video, so I'm going to grab hold of that bottom Cropping button and click and drag my mouse up. And once you've cropped the video as you so desire, go ahead and click the Crop button to save those changes. And now, when we jump to our Presentation View, and then press Play, the video will play out as normal. The only difference is the portions that were cropped will no longer display during the video play. And that is how you can crop video in PowerPoint 2010.

Trimming Video
You're watching the lesson, Trimming Video. In PowerPoint 2010, you have the ability to trim sections off of the beginning or the end of a video. To trim a video, first you'll need to select that video to bring up the Video Tools contextual tabs. On the Playback tab in the Editing group, you should see a large icon that looks like this, Trim Video. Clicking on Trim Video will bring up the Trim Video dialogue box. From here, you can click and drag the green starting icon at the beginning of the timeline to drag in to a particular portion of the video. Or click and drag the red icon at the very end of the timeline to click and trim seconds off the end of the video. You could also trim the beginning and end of the video by using the Start Time up and down arrows to trim microseconds off of your time. Or clicking any of the icons underneath the timeline, you can use these to play to preview what your clip looks like with those edits. Once you've trimmed the video the way you like, go ahead and click OK, and those changes will be saved to your PowerPoint file. And that is how you can Trim Video in PowerPoint 2010.