Monitoring Azure Resources and Web Applications with System Center Operations Manager 2016 (SCOM)

In this course, you'll learn to monitor web applications and Azure resources using SCOM 2016.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 24, 2017
Duration
2h 44m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction
Configure Synthetic Transactions and Client Perspective
Configure Global Service Monitor
Enable APM and Monitor Web Applications
Integrate SCOM with Azure Application Insights
Monitor Azure Virtual Machines
Integrate SCOM 2016 with Azure Log Analytics
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 24, 2017
Duration
2h 44m
Description

This course, Monitoring Azure Resources and Web Applications with System Center Operations Manager 2016 (SCOM), the final in the SCOM 2016 learning path, elevates your exploration on SCOM's monitoring behaviors by turning your attention first to web applications. In this course's first half, you'll explore Web Application Availability Monitoring and Transaction Monitoring. You'll also dig extraordinarily deep into your applications' internal workings by enabling SCOM's developer-focus APM - or Application Performance Monitoring - toolset. The second covers monitoring Azure. Using your on-premises SCOM instance, you'll integrate your local web application data with Azure's Application Analytics engine. You'll measure behaviors for Platform-as-a-Service Azure websites and keep tabs on Azure virtual machines and their accompanying resources like storage and networking. You'll wrap up with a quick look at SCOM's potential next-generation as you integrate SCOM with Azure Log Analytics, a part of Microsoft's cloud-based Operations Management Suite. By the end of this course, you'll be able to monitor web applications and Azure resources using SCOM 2016.

About the author
About the author

Greg Shields is an Author Evangelist at Pluralsight.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hey this is Greg Shields and you've found the final of my courses in this learning path on System Center Operations Manager 2016. This time on the use of SCOM to monitor web applications and Azure resources. I am author evangelist and a full-time author here at Pluralsight and I've been working with operations manager since back in the days when it was lovingly referred to as MOM. We have in this learning path installed and configured SCOM, and we've used it to monitor some of the core behaviors for on-premises Windows Server 2016 machines. What's great about our progress so far is that it perfectly prepares us for SCOM's more advanced functionalities. In this course, we elevate our exploration on SCOM's monitoring behaviors by turning our attentions first to web applications. In this course's first half we'll explore web application availability monitoring and transaction monitoring. We'll also dig extraordinarily deep into our application's internal workings by enabling SCOM's developer focused APM or Application Performance Monitoring toolset. Our second topic swings our target of monitoring to Azure. Using our on-premises SCOM instance, we'll integrate our local web application data with Azure's application analytics engine. We'll measure behaviors for platform as a service Azure websites. We'll keep tabs on Azure virtual machines and their accompanying resources, like storage and networking, then we'll leave with a quick look at SCOM's potential next generation as we integrate SCOM with Azure log analytics, a part of Microsoft's cloud-based operations management suite. If you've just been tasked with monitoring web applications and Azure resources with System Center Operations Manager, this course is your next stop in brushing up on those skills for success. And then from here, you'll be ready to continue on the learning path as you take what you've learned here and roll it into production. Let's get started.