Understanding Web Service Specifications in WCF

SOAP isn't dead yet! While the world is moving more and more towards REST services, SOAP is still very much alive, especially in the area of application and enterprise integrations. This course explains the WS-* standards that extend SOAP to make rich integration scenarios possible.
Course info
Rating
(195)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Mar 26, 2014
Duration
5h 44m
Table of contents
Introduction
Essentials of Web Service Specifications
Core Messaging
Reliable Messaging
WS-Security Essentials
WS-Security in WCF
Claims-Based Security
Transactions
Metadata
Description
Course info
Rating
(195)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Mar 26, 2014
Duration
5h 44m
Description

SOAP isn't dead yet! Enterprises have invested loads of money in the past decade to build their integrations on top of SOAP. WS-* specifications are extensions to SOAP that add capabilities to support advanced integration scenarios. This course first explains the origins of these standards, and then explains in detail some of the most important ones. Each module covers one or a group of related standards, the business needs, and WCF implementation.

About the author
About the author

Mohamad is a solution architect and Azure MVP with expertise in enterprise architecture, integration, identity and access, cloud, IoT, and data analysis.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction
Welcome to this course about Understanding Web Service Specifications in WCF. In this first module, I will set the context by explaining the motivation behind the course. I will explain the required prerequisites and the setup required to run the demos.

Essentials of Web Service Specifications
This module serves as a starting point to what lies ahead in the next modules. You will get the first taste about Web Service Specifications are and you will see two core standards that all other standards build on. First, I will explain what are specifications and standards. What is the process for generating them, and how they become adopted? While this information has real no importance in understanding how the standards actually work, I think it's always helpful to understand the origins of whatever topic you are studying. Then I will explain in more detail two core standards SOAP and WSDL. The purpose of discussing SOAP and WSDL is not to make you proficient in these standards, nor is this required anyway, since these standards are targeted more into two consumption. What I'm discussing here are core architectural concepts, so that when you start using the WS standards, you will be able to locate the changes that these standards exhibit on SOAP and WSDL.

Core Messaging
In this module, I will talk about WS-Addressing and MTOM. WS-Addressing is the standard that provides the messaging capabilities that basically all other standards utilize. Whether you are using security, transaction, metadata, or any other standard, you will find WS-Addressing messaging as the underlying mechanism by which these standards operate. MTOM on the other hand is used to enhance the performance of exchanging large binary data. Together, WS-Addressing and MTOM form the essential messaging infrastructure of WS Standards.

Reliable Messaging
In the previous module, you saw how WS-Addressing is the core messaging standard that all other standards utilize one way or another. In this module, I'll continue our discussion about messaging standards and you will see how to WS-ReliableMessaging provides reliable messaging support to Web Service interactions.

WS-Security Essentials
Security is an essential concern when organizations exchange information. Core web service standards such as WSDL and SOAP did not have inherit support for security and https was the only possible mechanism. WS-Security is an essential standard to understand, possibly, it is the single most important and used standard of all WS Standards. This module explains WS-Security and its understanding is also important, so that you can understand the upcoming module about Claim Security.

WS-Security in WCF
This module continues the discussion around WS-Security. The previous module laid out the foundations for WS-Security. Now, let's continue exploring WS-Security and focus on how it's implemented in real-world scenarios using WCF.

Claims-Based Security
In this module I will talk about two very important standards that I use in claims-based architectures. WS-Trust and WS-Federation build on WS-Security to facilitate claims-based access and federated security.

Transactions
Transactions are probably the most complicated topic in web services. The main reason is that in order to understand how transactions work, there are a lot of concepts that you need to understand first. This module explains these concepts before tackling the WS standards that relate to transactions. I already have a published course about transactions and their implementation in. NET and WCF. Now while that course and this module do overlap at some stages, the focus is different. First, the course talks about all transaction protocols while this module talks specifically about the WS-AtomicTransaction protocol. Also in the course, I did not explain the WS-AtomicTransaction standard itself in terms of messaging. The focus was. NET and WCF implementation. In this module, as I have been doing for all standards, I will explain the standard itself before I show you how it's implemented in WCF. A companion standard called WS-Coordination is also explained. Which brings me to the final difference. The course explains transactions in. NET and then moves to WCF. This module, after explaining the standard, talks about WCF only. Now for any topics that do overlap, these topics are explained again fully in this module. This preserves this module's independency in order to serve as a complete unit by itself.

Metadata
The final topic I want to explain in this course is that of metadata. Every standard you saw throughout this course represents a web service capability. The collection of these capabilities applied on a web service formed the contract of the service. This contract must be communicated to clients wishing to engage in an interaction with the service. Metadata is the mechanism by which the contract becomes available to clients.