Getting Started with Tilemap in Unity

Creating game levels has never been so easy. In this course you will be learning Unity's new tile mapping system to create a simple yet complex 2D playable level.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 1, 2018
Duration
58m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 1, 2018
Duration
58m
Description

If you have ever wondered how to create levels in a more time and cost-effective way, then this course is for you. In this course, Getting Started with Tilemap in Unity, you will be learning Unity's new Tile Palette tool. First, you will discover several different types of tiles used in unity's engine, Random tiles, Rule tiles, and Animated tiles. Next, you will explore the principles of level design and how to implement them into your current designs. Finally, you will learn the basics of collision scripting within Unity. By the end of this course, you will have the know how to create levels quickly with Unity's Tile Palette tool. Required Software: Unity 2018

About the author
About the author

Michael is a video game lover turned Game Jam enthusiast, turned Unity Certified Developer.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello everyone. My name is Michael Taylor, and welcome to my course, Getting Started with Tilemaps in Unity. In this course, we're going to be going over one of Unity's new tools, the Tile Palette tool, a tool that makes making levels easy and cost effective on both the level design and the art end. Some of the major topics that I will be covering include random tiles, rule tiles, animated tiles, basic principles of level design, and basic collision scripting. By the end of this course, you'll know how to work in Unity's Tile Palette tool and be able to make 2D levels fast and able to iterate on your levels quickly. Before beginning this course, you should be at least a little familiar with the Unity interface. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn the Tile Palette tool and the basic facets of level design with the Getting Started with Tilemaps in Unity course, at Pluralsight.

Getting Tile Mapping
Hello, I'm Michael Taylor, and in this course we're going to be looking at one of the many schools of thought in level design, tile mapping, specifically Unity's new 2D Tile Mapping tool, an aspect that certainly helps certain games, mostly in the roguelike genre. By the end of this course, you will be able to have a firm understanding of Unity's 2D Tile Mapping tool, along with some knowledge of level design and polish. We'll be using the Unity engine to achieve this, along with some extra tools, also from Unity. After we get the extra tools, I'll go over the Unity engine interface before going into the tile map interface, random tiles, animating tiles, etc. , etc. Before we jump in though, we need to define what tile map levels entails. Like I said, tile map levels are very popular with certain games like roguelikes, games that require a lot of levels or big levels, whichever one, with limited resources. The level comprises of repeatable square-like textures using sprites. This saves time for making levels in the traditional sense, i. e. putting in all the geometry one section at a time. Though it's also used in 3D games to a certain extent, it's mostly used in 2D, plus it's easier. With this info in mind, before we jump into the engine, we need to get some extra tools. The extra tools are going to be in this link below at GitHub. Now you don't need to worry about the website or anything, it's just used to store code and tools for programmers. All you need to worry about is downloading this repository by going to the download zip option, and once you've done that, go into Unity. Once you have it all downloaded and extracted, you just have to drag the Tilemap folder and Tilemap. meta file and Unity will work its magic to get in. And it's already there. And for reference, I'm using the beta version of Unity 2018. Don't worry if you don't have the beta version. In 9/10 go with the non-beta version. And in the next video, we'll be going over the interface. See you there.

Collision and Randomizing Tiles
In the last video we covered the basics of the tile palette, but unfortunately our tiles don't have collision yet. So if we try to put in a player object, go into Prefabs, and drag Player Guy into the hierarchy. Don't worry about the Player Guy, it's already prebuilt for you, but if we press Play, he'll just fall over. Giving our tiles collision is deceptively simple. Click on the Tilemap, go to Add Component, and we're going to type in Tilemap Collider, make sure it's 2D. And if we take a look in the scene, you can tell that it has a collider based on the faint green lines. Now if we press Play now, the player can move and collide with the ground. Now that we have collisions in, the next thing we're going to cover in the next video is rule tiles, which will make adding more terrain much more easier. In the meantime, feel free to experiment if you need to. See you there.