Using Git with a GUI

Getting started with Git is hard but I will help you smooth out the learning curve, understand Git’s mechanics, branching model, and in general be productive much quicker with the aid of a great free tool: Atlassian SourceTree.
Course info
Rating
(223)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Mar 8, 2016
Duration
2h 38m
Table of contents
Course Overview
The Case for Git with a GUI: Minimizing the Learning Curve
What You Need to Know About Git
Mechanics of Using Git (With a GUI)
Git: To the Next Level (With a GUI)
Branching Strategies for Every Occasion
Final Takeaway
Description
Course info
Rating
(223)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Mar 8, 2016
Duration
2h 38m
Description

There is no doubt Git is taking over the world of source control management, mainly in open source but growing rapidly in enterprise as well. The problem usually lies in that Git is not for the faint of heart as it comes with a steep learning curve - it is hard to get started. In this course, I will help you smooth out the learning curve, understand Git’s mechanics and branching model, and in general be productive much quicker with the aid of a great free tool: Atlassian SourceTree.

About the author
About the author

Xavier is very passionate about teaching, helping others understand search and Big Data. He is also an entrepreneur, project manager, technical author, trainer, and holds a few certifications with Cloudera, Microsoft, and the Scrum Alliance, along with being a Microsoft MVP.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone! My name is Xavier, and welcome to my course, Using Git with a GUI. Besides being very passionate about teaching, I have worked on all sorts of projects, big and small, startups to enterprise, and there is an area that's key to a project's success--source code management. Did you know that Git was created by Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, after their existing source code management system stopped being free and all work on the kernel ceased until the right source code management system was created. Well, Git was born. And from there, it was risen to the top as one of the most popular and powerful source code management systems used in open source, for example, GitHub, but used by Enterprise as well. Some of the major topics that we will cover include creating repositories and getting your code via clone, forking if necessary, learn the mechanics of Git including Git's killer feature, some advanced commands that will prove invaluable when required, and I'll help you pick the branching strategy of your preference to adopt as part of your project. At the end of this course, you will be proficient using Git with a GUI, namely a Atlassian SourceTree. I will make the adoption of Git much simpler and help you have less headaches. While it's not a requisite, it is nice if you have used any source code management system before, the Team Foundation Server, SVN, or any other. Knowledge of Git or at least having tried it before makes it even better. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn source code management with the Using Git With a GUI course at Pluralsight.

The Case for Git with a GUI: Minimizing the Learning Curve
Hello, and welcome to this Pluralsight training, Using Git with a GUI. Hi! I'm Xavier Morera, and I am very passionate about teaching. If you're here, I assume you may already know what Git is. If you don't, Git is a widely used source code management system for software development. Something else that Git is, or at least some say, is that Git is hard. You may agree or disagree. And in a lot of cases it is hard because of how powerful it is. But the whole point of this training is to help you either get started or become proficient when using Git. So let's start with The Case for Git with a GUI: Minimizing the Learning Curve. When Git was originally created, it was used directly from the command line. Let me add that there is nothing wrong with the command line, especially if you use it on a day-to-day basis. There are some developers that are extremely efficient with it, and this is okay. But there is another target audience who are used to working with an IDE. If you don't know what an IDE is, it stands for Integrated development Environment. For example, Visual Studio if you live in the. NET world or Eclipse on the Java side. And so all these developers prefer to have a visual interface like Atlassian SourceTree. It will feel more familiar, they will be able to learn quicker how to work with Git, and you will be able to concentrate on working on what matters the most--delivering working code. In my humble opinion, a GUI makes me more effective. Let's see with a demo.

Git: To the Next Level (With a GUI)
Welcome to the next module on Git with a GUI: Going to the Next Level. In this module, I will explain a few actions that may not be used on a daily basis but that can save you when you're in trouble. They're not yet terribly hard nor advanced. It is not a Git internals module. Yet they're pretty useful, and some actions will be needed for when we get to the next module--branching strategies. So let's get started with a quote:

Branching Strategies for Every Occasion
Branching Strategies for Every Occasion. And now that you're aware of the mechanics of Git and learned about a few more advanced commands but without getting into the low-level stuff, it is time to talk about branching strategies and how important it is to have one. Git is a very powerful tool, but, nonetheless, it is a tool. It is not a one-size-fits-all solution, which means that you're free to do with this tool as you please. The tool will allow you to do great things. But if misused, the tool will allow you to do bad things as well. So in order to have a successful usage of Git, it is necessary to pick the branching strategy that fits you the best. And even better while we are adopting Git, follow the mantra of "Keep it simple. " Starting with Git: Branching 101. So let's do a quick recap. Let's take a few baby steps. Git branches are different. They are used for daily development instead of the traditional approach of creating a branch to save a milestone like it is done in other systems. For example, SVN and Team Foundation Server. So let's work on making this transition to get as easy as possible. Even though Git is so flexible that you could use it in unimaginable ways, I will walk you through five branching strategies so that you can pick and choose the one that you want to work with. It is also possible that you will not pick the one that feels right on your first try. It is totally okay to test a few and then decide. So they are the centralized workflow, feature branch workflow, Git-flow workflow, forking workflow, and, finally, dictator and lieutenants workflow. And also remember that these are meant to be guidelines. They are not meant to be absolute truths written in stone.