Description
Course info
Rating
(244)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 19, 2012
Duration
2h 43m
Description

Using Visual Studio well is about more than writing code, or reading code written by others. To be truly productive, you need to debug well, and understand the designers that help you build your user interface. This course also shows you how to add helpful extensions that make Visual Studio even better.

About the author
About the author

Kate Gregory is in her fourth decade of being paid to program. Her firm, Gregory Consulting Limited, is based in rural Ontario and helps clients adopt new technologies and adjust to the changing business environment. Current work makes heavy use of .NET and Visual C++ for both web and client development, especially for Windows 7 and 8. Managing, mentoring, technical writing, and technical speaking occupy much of her time, but she still writes code every week.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Basic Debugging
Hi! Welcome to Part 2 of Introduction to Visual Studio 2012. My name is Kate Gregory and in this course, I'm going to build on what I showed in part 1 of Introduction to Visual Studio 2012 and show you some features of Visual Studio, you may not be familiar with including debugging, designers and extensions.

Additional Debugging Features
Hi, welcome back to Part 2 of Introduction to Visual Studio 2012. My name is Kate Gregory and I'm going to show you some features of Visual Studio you may not be familiar with including debugging, designers and extensions. In this module, I'll show how to take your debugging skills from the basic to the powerful. You know, this is one part of using Visual Studio where I just see a huge variation in abilities. Some developers struggle for literally hours trying to see why something's happening. Others use just a few more advance features and see their problem in minutes. I can't show you everything. I can't make you a natural born debugger. But I will take you beyond the basics and give you a debugging foundation that you can build on.

IntelliTrace
Kate: Hi. Welcome back to Part 2 of Introduction to Visual Studio 2012. My name is Kate Gregory and I'm going to show you some features of Visual Studio you may not be familiar with, including debugging, designers, and extensions. IntelliTrace, it's like time travel for debugging. In the module I'll show you, you can go back to when a bug happened before it blew up, let's say and look at the values and the flow so that you can see exactly how it all went down. I'll also show you how you can debug something that happened on another computer without having to reproduce the configuration of that other machine. I know it sounds impossible, but it's actually not only possible, it's pretty easy!

Working With Designers
Kate: Hi, welcome back to part two of Introduction to Visual Studio 2012. My name is Kate Gregory and I'm going to show you some features of Visual Studio that you might not be familiar with, including debugging, designers, and extensions. In this module I'm going to turn from code to user interface and specifically the designers in Visual Studio that you use to build a user interface. There are a lot of them because there's a lot of different frameworks and different kinds of applications you can build. The good news is, there's a lot of overlap. When you learn how to use one, you'll often find that that means you know quite a lot about all the others as well. The bad news is the overlapping features seem to be the ones most people don't know about. So I'll try to fix both parts of that by showing you some designer features and by showing you how much overlap there is.

Extensions
Hi! Welcome back to Part 2 of Introduction to Visual Studio 2012. My name is Kate Gregory, and I'm going to show you some features of Visual Studio you may not be familiar with including debugging, designers, and extensions. So by now, you're getting to know Visual Studio pretty well, especially if you dambled parts of this course, you've seen an awful lot of features and functionality. But I'm willing to bet it's not the only piece of software you've ever used in your life. And developers, just like other users, see things in one app that we want in another. We say, "Well, Word does something, can't Visual Studio to do that for me too? " Or some other development tool that I used on another platform in another language for another framework had a capability that I'd like in Visual Studio. Because so many different kinds of developers use Visual Studio, there are all kinds of wishes and wants and experiences and things people have seen elsewhere. And if you find yourself wishing that Visual Studio did something a little bit differently, there is good news. You can make it do things differently.