vSphere 6.5 Foundations: Availability and Resource Management

Watch this course to learn how to administer VMware vSphere 6.5 resources and availability including vSphere resource pools and advanced features like high availability, distributed resource scheduler, vSphere Data Protection, and Fault Tolerance.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Dec 15, 2017
Duration
3h 56m
Table of contents
Introduction
Create and Configure VMware Clusters
Plan and Implement VMware Fault Tolerance
Create and Administer Resource Pools
Migrating Virtual Machines
Backup and Restore Virtual Machines
Update ESXi and Virtual Machines
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Dec 15, 2017
Duration
3h 56m
Description

VMware vSphere is all about abstracting away physical constructs and pooling resources. However, you can take pooling too far and run out of capacity. In this course, vSphere 6.5 Foundations: Availability and Resource Management, you'll discover how to efficiently administer VMware vSphere 6.5 resources and availability by learning some of the advanced features it has to offer. First, you'll delve into resource management and distributed resource scheduler. Then, you'll explore vSphere availability features like vSphere High Availability (HA), Fault Tolerance (FT). Finally, you'll wrap up by learning about Data Protection. By the end of the course, you'll know everything you need to know for the vSphere Foundations exam.

About the author
About the author

David has authored over 50 courses for Pluralsight.com around enterprise data center technologies such as cloud computing, virtualization, and (especially) VMware vSphere.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Create and Configure VMware Clusters
One of the primary tools that vSphere uses to ensure high availability and high performance of vSphere virtual machines are VMware clusters, specifically High Availability, or HA, and Distributed Resource Scheduler, or DRS clusters. These HA and DRS clusters are used by most organizations out there in the world today who run VMware vSphere. And that's exactly what we'll be covering in this module. I'll kick it off by providing you and HA and DRS overview. After that, we'll determine how DRS and HA are applicable in an environment. I'll show you how to create and delete DRS and HA clusters. How to add and remove hosts from a HA and DRS cluster. How to add and remove virtual machines from DRS and HA. How to configure Storage DRS, or SDRS. How to configure enhanced vMotion compatibility. How to monitor a DRS and HA cluster. Configure migration thresholds, configure automation levels, configure host power management and DPM, or distributed power management. How to configure host virtual machine and application monitoring. And then finally, how to configure orchestrated VM restart with HA. I'll help you to understand the features of proactive HA and DRS. How to configure HA cluster-wide VM restart ordering. And finally, how to enforce infrastructural or intra-app dependencies in HA. Wow, we have got a lot of cool stuff to cover in this module on VMware clustering. So with that, let's get started.

Plan and Implement VMware Fault Tolerance
We talked about how vSphere's HA, or high availability, is there to restart virtual machines when a physical server fails. But what if you have applications that you don't want to have to restart? In other words, you don't want any downtime for those applications. What does VMware offer to help you meet that challenge? Well thankfully they have a solution and it's called VMware fault tolerance, or FT. In this module I'll cover planning and implementing VMware fault tolerance. We'll kick this module off by providing you an overview of what VMware fault tolerance is and how it works. After that we'll jump into the lab and I'll show you how to configure VMware fault tolerance networking. From there we'll discuss some different scenarios to help you to determine how to best configure fault tolerance for your use case. I'll walk you through enabling and disabling VMware fault tolerance on a virtual machine in the lab and then we'll test out fault tolerance live. You'll see whether it works or not. I'll give you a hint, it's going to work. And then finally, we'll wrap up the module by reviewing some common use cases for VMware fault tolerance. We've got a lot to cover, so with that let's get started.

Create and Administer Resource Pools
A big part of a VMware vSphere infrastructure is the pooling of resources. Just about from the beginning, VMware's mantra has been abstract, or virtualize, pool, which is what we're talking about here, and then automate. So it's always been abstract, pool, automate. So the pool part, specifically resource pools, and more and more flash resource pools are an important part of that. In this module, Create and Administer Resource Pools, that's exactly what we'll be covering. We'll kick it off by explaining VMware's vFlash architecture; how do vSphere and flash storage work together to help accelerate virtual machines and applications. From there I'll explain the use cases for traditional resource pools where you pool CPU and memory resources. After that we'll jump into the lab and create, as well as remove resource pools, configure resource pool attributes, add and remove virtual machines to the resource pool. From there, we'll create vFlash resource pools and assign vFlash resources to virtual machine disk files. Finally, I'll help you to determine some resource pool requirements. With that we've got a lot to cover, so let's get started.

Migrating Virtual Machines
VMware first released vMotion, one of their most well-known and most-appreciated features back in 2003. Whether you first saw it in 2003 or you first see it in this video training course, the first time someone sees a live vMotion, this light bulb, this ah-ha moment happens in their head when they say wow, this VMware vMotion is really, really incredible. With VMWare vMotion, you can move running virtual machines from one host to another with zero downtime. It is really incredible, and it's one of the feature that has made VMware the leader in enterprise virtualization. vMotion is also one of the required features for a number of the other advanced features that VMWare offers including DRS, or Distributed Resource Scheduler. In this module, we'll cover Migrating Virtual Machines using vMotion, as well as other forms of VMware migration. We'll kick it off by explaining Enhanced vMotion Compatibility, or EVC. From there, we'll explain Long Distance vMotion, something relatively new. We'll explain the process of vMotion and Storage vMotion migrations, and then we'll jump into the lab, where I'll show you how to configure virtual machine swap file locations, how to migrate powered-off or suspended virtual machines, and finally how to migrate virtual machines using vMotion and Storage vMotion. We've got a lot to cover, so with that let's get started.

Backup and Restore Virtual Machines
A critical role for any VMware vSphere administrator is to protect their virtual machines and the data that's inside. That's why it's so important that you back up your virtual machines, that you're able to test the restore or recovery of your virtual machine data, and also consider other data protection options, for example, vSphere Replication. This is exactly what we'll be talking about in this module. I'll kick it off by providing you an overview of VMware's Data Protection option. From there, I'll explain VMware Data Protection sizing guidelines, and then describe vSphere Replication architecture. I'll show you how to install and configure VMware Data Protection, create a backup job with VMware Data Protection, perform a live, full backup, and then a restore of a VMware virtual machine in VMware Data Protection, consolidate VMware Snapshots, perform a failback operation using vSphere Replication, and then finally we'll discuss the appropriate data protection solution or backup solution for your vSphere implementation. As you can see we've got a lot to cover in this module, all related to data protection, so let's get started.

Update ESXi and Virtual Machines
Keeping your vSphere hosts and virtual machines up to date is an important task to ensure not just that you have all the features available to you that you need, but also for security and reliability. And that's exactly what we'll be learning in this module. We'll kick it off with how to create, edit, and remove a host profile on an ESXi host. Host profiles help you to ensure that the host configuration is what you would like it to be, and what it should be for security and reliability reasons. I'll show you how to attach and apply a host profile to an ESXi host or cluster, how to perform compliance scanning and remediation using host profiles, and then from there we'll jump into vSphere Update Manager, how to install it and configure it, how to configure patch download options, how to create, edit, and delete Update Manager baselines, how to attach Update Manager baselines to an ESXi host or cluster, and finally, how to scan and remediate ESXi hosts and virtual machines using vSphere Update Manager. We've got a lot to cover; let's get started.