Introduction to Windows Forms

This course is designed to help you get started building applications with Windows Forms. It starts with basics and moves to application layout options, data binding, and deployment. Demonstrations are primarily done using Visual Basic.
Course info
Rating
(281)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 15, 2013
Duration
5h 51m
Table of contents
Forms, Controls and Events
More on Forms and Controls
Building MDI Applications
Building SDI Applications
Building Explorer-Style Applications
Introduction to Data Binding
Binding to DataSets
Binding to LINQ to SQL
Data Sources and Drag-Drop Data Binding
Deployment
Description
Course info
Rating
(281)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 15, 2013
Duration
5h 51m
Description

This course is designed to help you get started building applications with Windows Forms. We start by examining the core elements of WinForms by building an application just using code. Once we understand the foundation of Windows Forms, we turn our attention to the tooling included in Visual Studio. We then look at some common application layouts, building a complete application for each. Next is an examination of the data binding features of Windows Forms. We’ll bind to simple objects, DataSets and LINQ to SQL entities. Finally we see how we can easily deploy Windows Forms applications using ClickOnce.

About the author
About the author

Rob Windsor is a Senior Consultant and Trainer. He has almost twenty five years' experience developing all types of applications and is currently spending a majority of his time working with Office 365 and SharePoint.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

More on Forms and Controls
Hi everybody, this is Rob Windsor, and in this module, which is part of our Introduction to Windows Forms course, we'll continue our examination of Forms and Controls. In this module we'll take a look at the Form Lifecycle events, working with Dialogs, including building a custom Dialog, working with Menus and Toolbars, and building User Controls. The final section of the module introduces some common Application Layouts, and it previews the upcoming three modules.

Building MDI Applications
Hi everybody, this is Rob Windsor, and this module, which is part of our Introduction to Windows Forms course is on Building MDI Applications. In this module I'll give a brief introduction to MDI applications, covering some of the core concepts, and then we'll build an MDI Text Editor from start to finish.

Building SDI Applications
Hi everybody, this is Rob Windsor, and this module, which is part of our Introduction to Windows Forms course, is on Building SDI Applications. In this module, we'll build an SDI application from start to finish.

Building Explorer-Style Applications
Hi everybody, this is Rob Windsor, and this module, which is part of our Introduction to Windows Forms course, is on Building Explorer-Style Applications. In this module, we'll build an Explorer-Style application from start to finish.

Introduction to Data Binding
Hi everybody, this is Rob Windsor, and this module, which is part of our Introduction to Windows Forms course, is an Introduction to Data Binding. In this module we'll examine what data binding is and how it works. We'll look at simple data binding; that's binding to controls like a TextBox, a label, or a checkbox, complex data binding; that's binding to controls like a ComboBox, a ListBox, or a data grid. We'll look at the mechanics of binding to a set of objects in memory, and we'll finish off looking at the BindingSource control.

Binding to DataSets
Hi everybody, this is Rob Windsor, and this module, which is part of our Introduction to Windows Forms course, is on Binding to DataSets. For this outline to make sense, I need to give you a very brief introduction to DataSets. DataSets are basically in-memory databases. So traditionally what we'll do is when our form loads, we'll go to a database, get some data, and put it into the DataSet, then we'll data bind to the DataSet, and make all of our changes in-memory, and at some point we'll kick off a Save operation, where we take all of the changes we've made in-memory in the DataSet, and push them back into the underlying database. With that foundation covered, we can now get back to our outline. We'll begin the module with a little bit less brief introduction or primer on ADO. NET and DataSets, we'll see how we can populate DataSets from a database, we'll take a look at how to data bind to DataSets, we'll see how to Add and Remove Rows in a table in a DataSet, and finally how to save the changes we've made in the DataSet back to the database.

Binding to LINQ to SQL
Hi everybody, this is Rob Windsor, and this module, which is part of our Introduction to Windows Forms course is on Data Binding with LINQ to SQL. I'll begin the module with an introduction to LINQ to SQL and the main object in a LINQ to SQL module, which is the DataContext, and then we'll take a look at how to perform CRUD operations, that's Create, Read, Update, and Delete, against a LINQ to SQL model.

Data Sources and Drag-Drop Data Binding
Hi everybody, this is Rob Windsor, and this module, which is part of our Introduction to Windows Forms course, is on Visual Studios DataSources Window and Drag-and-Drop Data Binding. The contents of this module are pretty completely described by the title. We'll take a look at the DataSources Window and Drag-and-Drop Data Binding in Visual Studio and Windows Forms, and we'll see how the use of these tools could automate most of what we've done so far in terms of data binding. Because the focus of this module is almost completely on the tooling in Visual Studio, all of the content will be done via demos, which we'll move to now.

Deployment
Hi everybody, this is Rob Windsor, and this module, which is part of our Introduction to Windows Forms course, is on Deployment. Once you've completed building your application, you need some way to get it out to your clients, and with Windows Forms you have a few different options. For simple applications that have few external dependencies you can use XCopy deployment; basically you just take the contents of the bin-debug or bin-release folder, copy them from your development machine over to the client the machine. For more complex applications you'll need an installer package, and here you have two options. You can go with the traditional Windows Installer or MSI; there are a few options in terms of building these; you can use the Visual Studio setup project if you're using Visual Studio 2010 or earlier. This project type has been removed in Visual Studio 2012. You can use the Third-party installer Tool, a limited edition of Install Shield comes with Visual Studio 2010 and 2012, or you can go with something OpenSource like Windows Installer XML or WiX. The other option for creating an installer package is to use ClickOnce Deployment, and that's the focus of the remainder of this module.