Access 2013 Desktop Essentials: Part 2

Part 2 of 2 in the Access 2013 Desktop Essentials series. This course is designed for beginners and casual users of Microsoft Access 2013.
Course info
Rating
(48)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 23, 2013
Duration
5h 17m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(48)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 23, 2013
Duration
5h 17m
Description

Part 2 of 2 in the Access 2013 Desktop Essentials series. This course is designed for beginners and casual users of Microsoft Access 2013. You don't have to be an IT Pro or a developer to follow along. This course has anyone in mind who would like to be able to build a small, simple database to help track their everyday tasks and deadlines or other information that just doesn't quite work well in Excel.

About the author
About the author

Heather Ackmann is an accomplished instructor with a decade of teaching experience, helping students at the high school, college, and adult levels in a variety of topics. Specializing in Microsoft Office computer applications, she is a Microsoft Office Certified Master and holds a degree in English and Secondary Education.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Creating an Action Query
You're watching the lesson titled Creating an Action Query. So far in this course, we've mainly been dealing with select queries or queries that display or summarize data from one or more tables. Action queries are a bit different. Unlike select queries whose primary purpose is to display or summarize data, action query's primary function is to make changes to data. Action queries will apply changes or move many records in just one operation. You can move, edit, add, or even delete field data or entire records using various kinds of action queries. You have append queries which will add or copy data, update queries which will edit existing data, a make table query which, as the name suggests, will make a table from existing tables or queries, and delete queries which will delete mass quantities of data depending on the criteria you specify. But no matter the kind of action query you run, it is always a good idea to backup your database before running as changes made by an action query cannot be undone.

Introduction to Forms
You're watching a lesson titled Introduction to Forms. There's a lot you can do design-wise with forms in Microsoft Access and two basic types of forms you can create. There are bound forms and unbound forms. Now, bound forms are connected to some underlying data source, such as a table, query, or SQL statement. And bound forms are what people typically think of when they think of the purpose of a form. Forms are to be filled out or used to enter or edit data in a database. Now, unbound forms, on the other hand, are not connected to an underlying record or data source. Examples of bound forms will typically be what users use to enter, view or edit data in a database. Unbound forms could be dialog boxes, switch boards, or navigation forms. In other words, unbound forms are typically used to navigate or interact with the database at large, as opposed to the data itself. The forms that we will begin creating in this lesson will all be bound forms, meaning they'll be connected to some database object. And there're many types of bound forms you can create in Access. A very popular one is this single item form where records are displayed one record at a time. There is also what Microsoft calls a multiple items form, which will display multiple records at a time from that bound data source. And not a new edition, but a newer edition to Access is the split form view, where the form is divided in half, either vertically or horizontally, and one half displays a single item or record, and below will display a list or a datasheet view of multiple records from the underlying data source.

Creating Navigation Forms
You're watching the lesson titled Creating Navigation Forms. Microsoft Access offers several features for controlling how users navigate the database. So far, in this course, we've been using the navigation pane to navigate through all of the Access objects we create, such as forms, queries, tables, et cetera. The navigation pane offers an easy, out-of the box navigation for all Access objects, which is great when building a database. Plus, you can filter, sort, and search for objects by name. Not to mention, you can also customize navigation pane views, categories, and other options. But the navigation pane might not be for everybody. For those wishing to create their own navigational structure to make it easier for their users to find the specific objects that they really need, you can design and build forms containing command buttons to open various Access objects, or you can build what's known as a navigation form, which is a form that uses a navigation control so users can use or view forms and reports right from within that main navigation form.

Introduction to Macros
You're watching the lesson titled Introduction to Macros. Macros is Access work a bit differently from Macros in Word or Excel, where you essentially record a series of keystrokes and play them back later. On the contrary, Access Macros are built from a set of predefined actions, allowing you to automate common tasks, and add functionality to controls or objects as a whole. Macros can be stand alone objects viewable from the Navigation pane, or embedded directly into a Form or Report. Once you've created database objects like tables, forms and reports, Macros can provide a quick and easy way to tie all those objects together to create a simple database application that anyone can use or even modify, with relatively little training. Macros provide a way to run commands without the need to write or even know VBA code, and there's a lot that you could achieve just with Macros. In this lesson, we'll be creating a few very basic Macros that will be used to make navigation easier for anyone using the database. We'll be embedding Macros to command buttons and other controls, to use to open other objects in our database as well as creating a data Macro to log when a record was last modified.