ASP.NET 3.5 Fundamentals

Learn how to build modern, responsive Web applications on the Windows platform using ASP.NET.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 12, 2008
Duration
6h 59m
Table of contents
ASP.NET Architecture
Control-based Programming
User Interface Elements
Configuration
Deployment
Web Sites, Applications, and Virtual Directories in IIS
ASP.NET Diagnostics and Health Monitoring
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Nov 12, 2008
Duration
6h 59m
Description

ASP.NET has established itself as one of the most productive environments for building web applications and more developers are switching over every day. The 2.0 release of ASP.NET builds on the same componentry of 1.1, improving productivity of developers even further by providing standard implementations of common Web application features like membership, persistent user profile, and Web parts, among others. The 3.5 release adds several new controls including the flexible ListView and the LinqDataSource, as well as integrated suport for ASP.NET Ajax. This course will introduce practicing .NET developers to the comprehensive Web development platform that ASP.NET has become. We will cover fundamentals that have been in place since the 1.0 release, as well as all of the newer features found in the 2.0 and 3.5 releases with an emphasis on understanding how each new feature works and when to best apply it.

About the author
About the author

Fritz is a co-founder of Pluralsight where he serves as the Content Advisor. Fritz is the author of the books 'Essential ASP.NET' and 'Essential ASP.NET 2.0' published by Addison Wesley.

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Scott has over 15 years of experience in commercial software development and is a frequent speaker at national conferences, and local user groups. Scott is a Microsoft MVP and has authored books on several Microsoft technologies, including ASP.NET, C#, and Windows Workflow.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

ASP.NET Architecture
Hi, this is Fritz Onion with Pluralsight, and I'll be presenting this module on ASP. NET Architecture. What we're going to be focusing on in this module is a look at how ASP. NET fundamentally works. So we'll start off with a discussion of the architecture of ASP. NET, what happens when a request comes in for an aspx file, and how is that a service and how is it handled with respect to IIS. We'll talk about how ASP. NET integrates into IIS, both in IIS 6 and 7, as they differ somewhat, as well as the worker process and the ISAPI integration. Then we're going to step back and take a look at sort of the evolution of ASP. NET, how has it evolved over time and where is it today. So we'll look at some things like dynamic content, its history and classic ASP, as well as the newer server-side controls and data binding and declarative data binding models, so hopefully give you a sense for how pages are typically developed in ASP. NET and the fundamentals techniques for presenting dynamic content. We'll also take a look at the code-behind model, how do you specify a class that's going to be used in association with your page. We'll take a look at the page lifecycle, the sequence of events that occur every time a page is processed and how you can tap into them. Event handling as well, we'll look at how to handle events like PageLoad and PageInit, as well as server-side control events like click events for button controls. Then we'll finish up by looking at some special directories that are defined in ASP. NET for things like placing code and deployed assemblies, as well as a discussion of the shadow copying mechanism which makes it possible to deploy new binaries in your websites without having to shut down the web server. So that's going to be our goal, and we'll start off, as I mentioned, with a discussion of the general architecture and move on from there.