Building PSTN Gateways, SIP Trunks, and CUBEs for Cisco Collaboration (300-070) CIPTV1

Connecting to clusters and the PSTN are key elements of a Cisco Unified Collaboration deployment. This course teaches you how to configure H.323 and MGCP gateways, SIP trunks, and CUBEs to work with Cisco Unified Communications Manager.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 4, 2018
Duration
3h 53m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Configuring MGCP Gateways to Access the PSTN
Configure H.323 Gateways to Access the PSTN
How to Read SIP Messages
Building SIP Trunks
Configuring Cisco Session Border Controller (CUBE)
Configuring CUBE Translations and Permissions
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 4, 2018
Duration
3h 53m
Description

In today's fast-paced world, the ability to communicate using real-time IP voice and video technology is a business necessity. Cisco is doing its part in leading this technological revolution. In this course, Building PSTN Gateways, SIP Trunks, and CUBEs for Cisco Collaboration (300-070) CIPTV1, you will be preparing to pass the Implementing Cisco IP Telephony and Video Part 1 exam. First, you will learn how to configure MGCP and H.323 gateways to communicate with Cisco Unified Communications Manager to provide access to the PSTN. Next, you will see how read and troubleshoot SIP messages, configure SIP trunks, and utilize the Intercluster Lookup Service (ILS) to support dynamic call routing between clusters. Finally, you will explore how to configure a Cisco Session Border Controller (CUBE), a crucial component used in the latest collaboration solutions. When you're finished with this course, you'll have the skills and knowledge needed to configure the Cisco Unified Communications Manager to work with MGCP, H.323, and SIP.

About the author
About the author

Sean Douglas has more than 17 years of experience working extensively with Cisco technology. He is a Cisco Systems Engineer that consults with a variety of clients to design, implement, and maintain their Cisco Collaboration solutions. Sean is CCNP in Routing and Switching, Wireless, and Collaboration.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone! I'm Sean Douglas, and welcome to my course, Building Gateways, SIP Trunks, and CUBEs for Cisco Collaboration CIPTV1 for the Cisco CCNP 300-070 exam. I've worked with Cisco technology for almost two decades, and I've helped hundreds of administrators and organizations create Cisco Unified Collaboration solutions. Throughout this course, which is part of a series that we're creating, we're going to help prepare you for the Implementing Cisco IP Telephony and Video, Part 1 exam. Not only will this course help prepare you for the CIPTV1 exam, it's going to provide you with real-world solutions. We're going to save you a lot of time. We're going to use extensive demonstrations to show you the step-by-step process of configuring traditional telephony gateways to work with Cisco Unified Communications Manager using H. 323 and MGCP. We're going to show you how to create SIP trunks to route calls between clusters, as well as how to implement the Intercluster Lookup Service. Finally, we're going to show you how to build a CUBE, which is a Cisco session border controller. Traditional telephony is being replaced by SIP trunks, and if you're going to have a SIP trunk, you're certainly going to want to have a CUBE. By the end of this course, you'll be well on your way to preparing for the Implementing Cisco IP Telephony and Video, Part 1 exam, and you'll be able to reference our step-by-step demonstrations in your day-to-day career. Before beginning this course, you should have a basic understanding of Cisco Unified Communications Manager either by having watched the previous courses in our series, Basic Call Operation and Components and Dial Plan for Cisco Unified Communications Manager, by being at about the CCNA Collaboration level, or have some experience working with Cisco Unified Communications Manager. I hope you'll join me as we learn about Cisco Collaboration with the Building Gateways, SIP trunks, and CUBEs for Cisco Collaboration CIPTV1 course at Pluralsight.

Building SIP Trunks
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Sean Douglas, and this is the Building Gateways, SIP Trunks, and CUBEs for Cisco Collaboration CIPTV1 course. And this is for the 300-070 exam. In this module, Building SIP Trunks, that's exactly what we're going to do. In the last module, we examined SIP. We took a look at what SIP messages are and how it works. We know what a successful SIP call should look like. Now we're going to put that into action. Our first move is going to be to create trunks between clusters. We want to be able to communicate with other phones. Forty thousand of them can register into our Cisco Unified Communications Manager cluster, but there're a lot more phones out there than just that. There're a few different ways we can communicate with them. One way is to create a trunk to the system that controls the other endpoints. And if we do that, we've got two options: We can use SIP or H. 323. In this module, we're going to demonstrate the step-by-step process of configuring a SIP trunk so that we can communicate with those phones. Then we're going to move into ILS. It's one of my favorite features because it allows us to use email addresses. Imagine being able to call anyone with just an email address instead of having to try to remember, What's their cell phone? What's their internal extension? Just use one address to communicate with people. We can do that, and we can also turn on ILS, Intercluster Lookup Service, so that our Cisco Unified Communications Manager will automatically share those email addresses or SIP URIs between clusters. It's a great feature, and we're going to show you the step-by-step process of how to set that up. We've got a lot in store. And if you're ready, I'm ready!

Configuring Cisco Session Border Controller (CUBE)
Hi everyone! Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Sean Douglas, and this is the Building Gateways, SIP Trunks and CUBEs for Cisco Collaboration CIPTV1 course. And this is for the 300-070 exam. In this module, Configuring Cisco Session Border Controllers, aka CUBEs, we're going to configure a CUBE from the ground up. Gone are the days of needing a gateway at your facility where you have to physically plug in to the traditional telephony network. We're replacing that with SIP trunks, and if you're going to add a SIP trunk to the carrier, you absolutely want to have a CUBE between you and the carrier so that you can provide policy. And in this module, we're going to show you exactly how to implement that. Our goals for this module are going to be to use SIP to connect to the public switched telephone network, and that means we're going to start by creating a SIP trunk from our Cisco Unified Communications Manager cluster to our CUBE. Then we're going to build the CUBE from scratch. That means configuring dial peers, adding a variety of other SIP commands, and then using some newer features that can help save you time and make configuring your cube a lot easier. And then, finally, because things don't always work out the way we planned, we're going to demonstrate how to examine SIP messages using our router's debug.

Configuring CUBE Translations and Permissions
Welcome everyone! I'm Sean Douglas, and this is the Building Gateways, SIP Trunks, and CUBEs for Cisco Collaboration CIPTV1 course, and this is for the 300-070 exam. In this module, Configuring CUBE Translations and Permissions, we're going to create additional policies for our Cisco Unified Border Element. Our goals for this module are going to be to demonstrate two important features that we're going to implement on our CUBE. The first one is how to create voice translation rules. And then we're going to show you how to configure Class of Restriction or COR permissions for the CUBE. Both of these features are important as companies rely on CUBEs because they're transitioning away from traditional telephony services. They're replacing analog and digital telephony with SIP trunks, and they rely on CUBEs to perform policy. And both of these features give the administrator the ability to implement policies with precision.