Cisco CCIE Routing and Switching: Implement Ethernet Technologies

This course is part 1 of 2 of the Cisco CCIE Routing and Switching: Implementing Layer 2 Technologies series. This course prepares candidates for the Implement Ethernet Technologies section of the CCIE Routing and Switching written exam 400-101.
Course info
Rating
(38)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Aug 14, 2013
Duration
6h 38m
Table of contents
Introduction to Implementing Layer 2 Technologies
Implementing Ethernet Technologies
Spanning-Tree Protocol Fundamentals
Spanning-Tree Protocol Enhancements
Rapid Spanning-Tree Protocol
Multiple Spanning-Tree
VLANs and VTP
Trunking and EtherChannels
SPAN and RSPAN
Unidirectional Link Detection (UDLD)
Chassis Virtualization and Aggregation Techniques
Description
Course info
Rating
(38)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Aug 14, 2013
Duration
6h 38m
Description

This course is part 1 of 2 of the Cisco CCIE Routing and Switching: Implementing Layer 2 Technologies series. This course is part of a series of courses to prepare candidates to pass the CCIE Routing and Switching written exam, as well as to provide CCIE candidates with a strong level of fundamental knowledge needed to begin studying for the CCIE Routing and Switching lab exam. In this course, your instructor, Joe Astorino, will cover all of the topics listed under the "Implement Layer 2 Technologies" of the current CCIE Routing and Switching written exam blueprint including Spanning-Tree Protocol, Frame-Relay, Ethernet technologies, and more. The course is designed for those who have at least a CCNP R&S level of knowledge.

About the author
About the author

Joe Astorino is Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) #24347. He has over ten years experience working in several large scale enterprise network environments as a key part of several high profile, highly visible network teams for organizations.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction to Implementing Layer 2 Technologies
Welcome to TrainSignal, everybody, this is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347, and I'm going to be your instructor for this course, in the CCIE Routing and Switching written series, specifically this course on implementing layer two technologies. Before we get started into all the technical deep dives, I just wanted to take a few minutes to have you guys get to know me a little bit, a little bit about my background, where I come from. A little bit about what the CCIE program is, a little bit about the program and a little bit about the course, so let's jump right in.

Implementing Ethernet Technologies
Welcome to Train Signal this is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347, and in this video we're going to be taking a look at the implementing Ethernet technologies portion of the blue print for the CCIE route and switch version 4. 0 written exam. Now this particular portion of the blueprint really covers all the fundamental, basic Ethernet concepts that we've all known and loved since CCNA. Much of this will probably be review. If this is not review information for you, you probably should go back and do a little bit of studying up. Now it is important that we cover all these basic things even if it is a review, because a couple of reasons. Fundamentals really go a long way once we start getting into more advanced topics. And 2, very fundamental questions make really good exam questions. So, it's important to not overlook and not underestimate these basic concepts.

Spanning-Tree Protocol Enhancements
Welcome to TrainSignal everybody. This Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347. And in this video we're going to be taking a look at all the different various enhancements to the original Spanning Tree Protocol. Now we're not talking about rapid Spanning Tree, or multiple Spanning Tree, or any of the different, actual modes of Spanning Tree, just the enhancements that were added prior to those. You'll see what I mean here in a second. So when I talk about enhancements, I'm specifically talking about PortFast, the UplinkFast feature, BackboneFast, Loop Guard, Root Guard, BPDU Guard, and BPDU Filter. Now I know when I first started out in the Cisco world with my CCNA/CCNP, this was just a whirlwind of terms, I mean, it seemed like everything was something faster, backbone, or a guard, or a filter, and it was just a big, confusing mess. So I want to help you guys avoid going through the pain and suffering that I went through, to get to where I am today, and hopefully this video is going to do that. Now what is the point of all this stuff? Basically, it boils down to two things. Convergence time and security. Some of these make the convergence of Spanning-Tree faster, and some of them involve specific security measures we can take in our layer two networks.

Rapid Spanning-Tree Protocol
Welcome to Train Signal. This is Joe Esterino, CCIE number 24347. And in this video we're going to be taking a quick look at the Rapid Spanning-Tree Protocol, which is the IEEE's sort of latest and greatest version of spanning tree. Really, what they did with Rapid Spanning-Tree Protocol is they took the original Spanning-Tree Protocol. They looked at some of the enhancements that Cisco had done in a proprietary nature in things like per VLAN Spanning-Tree Protocol plus. Things like BackboneFast, UplinkFast, Portfast, some of the fast convergence mechanisms. And they've rolled it into an industry standard protocol to essentially speed things up. So without further ado, let's jump into the Rapid Spanning-Tree Protocol.

SPAN and RSPAN
Welcome to TrainSignal, everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347. And in this video we're going to be taking a look at the switched port analyzer or SPAN, and the remote switch port analyzer or RSPAN. Now, these are two protocols we can use as network engineers to monitor sources. Whether the source is on the same switch as us. Or the source is on a separate switch from us, with RSPAN. So that we can do network analysis, packet captures, all sorts of things like that. So let's jump into some of the basic definitions and some of the essential concepts behind SPAN and RSPAN, and get started here today.

Unidirectional Link Detection (UDLD)
Welcome back to Train Signal everybody. This is Joe Astorino. CCIE number 24347. And in this video, we're going to be taking a look at Cisco's proprietary UDLD, or Unidirectional Link Detection. Now as the name says here, this particular protocol's going to help us monitor for unidirectional links, misconfigured links, and it's going to help us take some action, if we configure it properly here, to help us prevent against some of the problems that come up with unidirectional links. Or, in other words, links where we can send but we can't receive, or maybe we can receive but we can't send. We're going to start by taking a look at the basics of the protocol. Then we're going to look at what the actual main problem is we're trying to solve. Compare it a little bit with spanning tree loop guard, and then we'll look into the protocol operations. And finally, configuring and monitoring the thing. So, let's jump into UDLD.

Chassis Virtualization and Aggregation Techniques
Welcome back to TrainSignal everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347 and I'd like to welcome you today to our module on Chassis Virtualization and Aggregation Techniques. One of the newer topics added to the most recent CCIE route and switch written exam. Now in this particular module we're going to start by looking at the problem we're trying to solve as usual, and then we're going to look at a few of the specific solutions to this problem. So, namely in general, Multichassis EtherChannels, which we can implement a bunch of different ways. We're going to look specifically at Cisco's virtual switching system or VSS, and we're going to take a look at their stackwise technology we have on the stackable switch platforms like the 3750. Now one thing that we won't really be going into detail on is virtual port channels or VPC. And the reason for that is if we look closely at the blueprint, it's specifically in the section calls out VSS. It specifically calls out multichannel, or, Multichassis EtherChannel and specifically calls out Cisco stackwise. It also makes mention that they're going to exclude platform-specific technologies here. And because VPCs are such a heavy part of the data center, CCIE track, we're going assume that VPCs are not going to be something we're, they're going to go into a great amount of detail on for the CCIE route and switch. So we're going to focus mainly on VSS and Stackwise today. So let's get started with the problem it is we're trying to solve in the first place.