Cisco CCIE Routing and Switching: Implement IPv4 and IGPs

This course prepares candidates for the routing section of the CCIE Routing and Switching written exam 400-101, and will provide CCIE candidates with a strong level of foundational knowledge in routing needed to begin studying for the CCIE Routing and Switching lab exam.
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Nov 4, 2013
Duration
10h 57m
Table of contents
Introduction to the Course
RIPv2 Foundations
RIPv2 Foundations Configuration
RIPv2 Advanced Features
OSPF Foundations
Dissecting the OSPF LSDB
Exploring OSPF Network Types
Exploring OSPF Advanced Features
IS-IS Foundations
IS-IS Configurations
EIGRP Foundations
Dissecting the EIGRP Composite Metric
EIGRP Advanced Features
EIGRP Named Mode
EIGRP Over-the-Top (OTP)
Policy-Based Routing and GRE Tunnels
Description
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Advanced
Updated
Nov 4, 2013
Duration
10h 57m
Description

The primary goals of this course are to prepare candidates for the routing section of the CCIE Routing and Switching written exam, as well as to provide CCIE candidates with a strong level of foundational knowledge in routing needed to begin studying for the CCIE routing and switching lab exam. At the end of the course, a student should feel confident in his or her knowledge of the routing-based topics covered by the CCIE routing and switching written exam, and will have the fundamental knowledge necessary to begin their longer journey to passing the CCIE lab exam. Please note the course is not designed to fully prepare a candidate to sit the CCIE lab exam, but rather to prepare a candidate to pass the written exam and as a stepping stone into lab exam preparation. More information about the CCIE program can be found at http://www.cisco.com/go/ccie.

About the author
About the author

Joe Astorino is Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) #24347. He has over ten years experience working in several large scale enterprise network environments as a key part of several high profile, highly visible network teams for organizations.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

RIPv2 Foundations
Welcome to Pluralsight, everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347. And in this video, we're going to be taking a look at, the foundations of the Routing Information Protocol Version two, or RIP Version two.

RIPv2 Advanced Features
Welcome to Pluralsight everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347, and I want to welcome you to the RIPv2 Advanced Features, section of this module. In this particular section, we're going to be looking as the title here kind of indicates, at some of the more advanced features up of RIPv2. Things like authentication, route filtering, playing around with our metrics, triggered updates. A couple of the more advance things with the protocol. Now, as usual we'll be talking about some theory. And we'll be digging into a lab and configuring mostly all the things we're going to talk about. So, let me refresh your memory. Here's the lab we're dealing with. It should look very familiar to you if you've been watching the other videos. Because we're basically taking the RIP configuration we built back in the previous module, and now we're adding on some of these more advanced features to it. So let's jump right in.

OSPF Foundations
Welcome to Pluralsight, everybody. This is Joe Astorino's CCIIE number 24347. I want to welcome you today to the OSPF Foundation's module of our CCIE routing and switching IGP section. So, we'll be getting started here in a second. Before we hit the ground running let's just take a quick look at the lab typology that we're going to be dealing with. Now the lab in this particular module will be kind of evolving a little bit as we go along. So, as we configure different aspects, we'll change a few things and I'll update the diagram as we go along. So a couple things will change when we get the stub areas, not so stub areas, stuff like that. But generally this is what we're going to be dealing with. So without further adieu, let's jump right into probably the biggest, most complex out of the IGPs OSPF.

Dissecting the OSPF LSDB
Welcome to Pluralsight, my name is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347. And in this module we're going to be dissecting the OSPF link-state database, that's right, we're going to take a look at each of the different LSA types we learned about in previous modules and really digging in on the command-line at each one of them to go a little bit more in depth and really dig into that link state database. So let's pull up the lab topology, you should be very familiar with this by now, if you've been watching along in the OSPF section line of videos and this is really the topology we built and the previous OSPF video and we're going to be taking this topology as a basis for dissecting some link stay databases here in OSPF. So if you recall the LSA that are important for knowing in OSPF are going to be the Type 1 router LSA, the Type 2 network LSA, the Type 3 summary LSA, Type 4 ASBR summary LSA, Type 5 External LSA, and the Type 7 NSSA External LSA. We will take a look at each one of these throughout this module and take a line-by-line in depth look. So that we can better understand these LSAs in our topology here today. So let's jump into the router LSA.

Exploring OSPF Advanced Features
Welcome to Pluralsight everybody, my name is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 2437, and I'd like to welcome you today to the OSPF advanced features module of our Cisco CCIE routing and switching IGP's course. As usual, let's take a look at our lab topology. If you've been following along with the OSPF modules. In this course. This should be no surprise to you. Should look very familiar because we built this from the ground up through our other OSPF modules. Now, we're just going to be layering on top of our existing topology and adding in some of the more advanced. Advanced features, like route filtering, summarization, and some other things along the way. So let's jump right in.

IS-IS Foundations
Welcome to Pluralsight everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347. And in this module we're going to be taking a look at the foundations of the intermediate system to intermediate system or IS-IS routing protocol. Now, this is one of my favorite new topics that's been reintroduced to the CCIE routing and switching written world. And I'm excited to go through this topic with you guys. So let's get started with IS-IS.

IS-IS Configurations
Welcome back to Pluralsight everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347 and in this particular module we're going to take some of that theory we learned in the IS-IS foundations and as usual start putting it into practice in a lab environment so we can get a little bit better of a feel how this stuff works. Take a look at the actual config and the verification in a lab environment. So, we're going to start out just by taking a quick look at the topology and what we have to deal with here and then, we're going to look at enabling IS-IS, throughout the topology. Now, although the CCIE route and switch-written blueprint. It does specifically call out a single area, a single topology IS-IS. We're going to get a little bit more detailed we, we will be running multiple areas here. It never hurts to be a little bit more prepared and it kind of cements some of theories we were talking about with regards to the backbone, and how different routers peer with different types of routers, over certain types of links. So we're going to take a look at that, and then we'll take a look at some verification commands. And things like our shell commands, taking a look at the IS-IS link state database, and things of that nature. So let's jump into IS-IS configurations.

EIGRP Foundations
Welcome to Pluralsight, everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347. And in this module we're going to be taking a look at the foundations, Fundamentals of the EIGRP Routing Protocol. So, let's get started by taking a look, as usual, at our lab topology. Now, if you've been going through the IGP's class with us, this is going to look very familiar to you. So, at the diagram we've used with our other routing protocols and, now, we're pretty much just tweaking it for EIGRP. So, up here we've got OSPF actually running with a backbone router simulating somewhat of a service provider type environment, and everything else is going to be running EIGRP. We're going to probably run autonomous system one, or whatever number it is we choose. You see we have some frame relay here. We've got some Ethernet down on VLAN 234 as well as some point to point links. And this is going to allow us to configure some basic EIGRP and take a look at a few of these foundational topics as we move through the video. So, let's jump in to EIGRP everybody.

Dissecting the EIGRP Composite Metric
Welcome to Pluralsight, everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347. And I'd like to welcome you today to our module on Dissecting the EIGRP Composite Metric. This is the particular module in the series where we get to go really deep with the math. We're going to explain the specifics and the guts of this EIGRP Composite Metric calculation, and then we're going to run through an example and see if we can actually be the router and calculate the same numbers that the router is for these composite metrics. So, let's dive into the lab topology. Should look pretty familiar to us by now. Just in case you haven't been watching the previous modules, this is what we have going on. So, a pretty basic network setup, in this case, we're running EIGRP autonomous system one, all through these six routers down here, and we're redistributing some OSPF routes from a service provider up on router one, really for this module, it's going to be mostly theory with the metric. After we explain the theory though, we're going to jump onto router six and actually see how router six calculates the metric for a particular route, and we're going to see if we can come up with the same numbers by applying what we learn in the module. So let's jump into dissecting the EIGRP Composite Metric. One of my favorite topics throughout this series.

EIGRP Advanced Features
Welcome to Pluralsight everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347 and I'd like to welcome you today to our EIGRP advanced features module of our IGP section. Now we're going to take a quick look at the lab as usual. This is the same lab we've been building on throughout the IGRP section. So basically we've got some redistribution going on from OSPF up here and EIGRP, AS1 running all through down here. We've already got the basic EIGRP up and running from the foundations module. And in this module we're going to be building on to that by looking at some of the more advanced features of EIGRP like, Tweaking Administrative Distance, Route Filtering, Stub Routing, Leak Maps and much more. So, let's jump in and get started.

EIGRP Named Mode
Welcome to Pluralsight everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347 and I'd like to welcome you today to our module here on EIGRP Named Mode. Now, we've all kind of known and loved EIGRP as it's been for years, right? Where we say router EIGRP and we give it the AS number. Well EIGRP Named Mode is basically just a new paradigm for configuring EIGRP, so same protocol, same rules, different syntax, okay. And this is something that's recently been added here to the CCIE Route and Switch Version 5 written Exam. And something that we need to be familiar with here moving forward. It's something we can only really see on fairly newer versions of IOS and IOSXE. And we're going to dig into that today. So we'll begin by taking a look at why we're doing this in the first place. Then we're going to take a look at the three main modes we can configure within EIGRP Named Mode. And then within each of those modes we'll take a look at some real life examples as we're going through it to demonstrate each of the three main modes. So let's get started.

EIGRP Over-the-Top (OTP)
Welcome back to Pluralsight everybody. This is Joe Astorino CCIE number 24347, and I would like to welcome you guys to our module on EIGRP Over-the-Top. Now EIGRP Over-the-Top is a new feature they've recently added to EIGRP to help us really try and simplify certain types of more complex WAN designs. It's aimed at solving some of the specific problems around those WAN designs that we'll see here in a second. What we're going to do is examine what exactly is EIGRP OTP. We'll look at a bit how it works, at the control plane and data plane levels. We'll look at how it scales using route reflectors and we'll look at a little bit of the configuration. It's actually simpler than you might think to configure EIGRP OTP. One of the exciting new features that's been added to the route and switch written exam blue print. So let's get started with EIGRP Over-the-Top.

Policy-Based Routing and GRE Tunnels
Welcome to Pluralsight everybody. This is Joe Astorino, CCIE number 24347, and I'd like to welcome you to our module on Policy-Based Routing and GRE Tunnels. The module I kind of wish I would have called duct tape and twine, right? Because those are really kind of terms that would describe situations where you may get into using policy-based routing and GRE tunnels. So let's jump in and start with some policy-based routing, we'll move into GRE tunnels, and then we'll apply some of what we've talked about in our lab here today, as usual.