Cisco CCNA: Network Control and Security

Part 4 of 4 in the Cisco CCENT - ICND1 (100-101) series will teach the fundamental concepts of networking, and then immedately apply this knowledge to the configuration of a router and switch.
Course info
Rating
(205)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 26, 2013
Duration
5h 37m
Table of contents
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
Static Network Address Translation (NAT)
Dynamic Network Address Translation (NAT)
Access Control Lists (ACLs)
Extended Access Control Lists
Switch Security: Native VLANs, DHCP Spoofing, and DTP
Switch Security: Switchport Port-security
Network Device Security
IPv6
Next Steps
Description
Course info
Rating
(205)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 26, 2013
Duration
5h 37m
Description

Part 4 of 4 in the Cisco CCENT - ICND1 (100-101) series will teach the fundamental concepts of networking, and then immedately apply this knowledge to the configuration of a router and switch. By the end of the course, the student will have enough knowledge to set up a network environment that has multiple subnets over multiple virtual LANs (VLANs), use network address translation (NAT) to connect to the Internet, and hand out IP addresses automatically. Additionally, the student will take a deep dive into IP addressing, using binary, to really gain a fundamental understanding of how endpoints are addressed. All you need as a prerequisite is a willingness to learn and basic computer skills.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Dynamic Network Address Translation (NAT)
Welcome to Train Signal. I am Ross Bagurdes. In this video, we are going to be talking about network address translation again. This time we're talking about dynamic NAT. Now if you haven't already, I highly recommend you watch the static NAT video. However, dynamic NAT we use a lot more often, especially in our home networks. And this is actually pretty pervasive throughout all of industry. We just find that we use it very often. And it's probably the sole mechanism of NAT that we use in our internal home networks. Let's take a look at how it works.

Switch Security: Native VLANs, DHCP Spoofing, and DTP
Welcome to TRAINSIGNAL. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this video we're going to be talking about switch security, and specifically we're going to talk about the Native VLAN and the issues involved with that, DHCP spoofing, and I'll explain that attack in a little bit. And dynamic trunk protocol, or DTP. Now we're going to look at the issues that each of these create and how to solve them. In a later video we're going to go into even more detailed switch security when we talk about switch port security.

Network Device Security
Welcome to Train Signal. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and in this video we're going to discuss network device security. Now network security is a complex topic. It is wrought with both real quality information about security and challenging information to see if the vulnerabilities you're trying to protect are actually real and you shouldn't be wasting your time protecting them. So the market is full of buzz words and policy types and all this stuff that revolve around network security. What we're going to tackle in this is not so much the big picture of network security, but more so how we can take some of the services that are automatically enabled on a Cisco device, and modify them so that they make our router we're using in our environment much less susceptible to network attacks. Alright, so let's dive in and take a look at some of these.

Next Steps
Welcome to Trainsignal. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this video we're going to talk about some next steps now that you've completed the ICND1 series. So, now that you've completed the series, if you've studied enough and you're ready, you can actually take one of the certification exams for the entry level certification and earn your CCENT. The exam above that is the associate level certification, which is the CCNA, Cisco Certified Network Associate. Above that is a professional level certification, which is the Cisco Certified Network Professional. And last is the certified Cisco inter-networking expert. And that is the expert level certification. But, to get started, once you take the ICND1 exam, you actually earn your CCENT certification. So, let's take a look at that.