Cisco CCNA: Routing and VLANs

This course is part 3 of 4 in the Cisco CCENT - ICND1 (100-101) series. In this course, the student will learn the fundamental concepts of networking, and then immedately apply this knowledge to the configuration of a router and switch.
Course info
Rating
(387)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 26, 2013
Duration
5h 37m
Table of contents
Introduction to Subnetting
Subnetting Examples
Variable Length Subnet Masking (VLSM)
Building the Routing Table
Route Summarization
Dynamic Routing
Introduction to OSPF
Virtual LANs (VLANs)
VLAN Trunks
Inter-VLAN Routing
Description
Course info
Rating
(387)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 26, 2013
Duration
5h 37m
Description

This course is part 3 of 4 in the Cisco CCENT - ICND1 (100-101) series. In this course, the student will learn the fundamental concepts of networking, and then immedately apply this knowledge to the configuration of a router and switch. By the end of the course, the student will have enough knowledge to set up a network environment that has multiple subnets over multiple virtual LANs (VLANs), use network address translation (NAT) to connect to the Internet, and hand out IP addresses automatically. Additionally, the student will take a deep dive into IP addressing, using binary, to really gain a fundamental understanding of how endpoints are addressed. All you need as a prerequisite is a willingness to learn and basic computer skills.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Subnetting Examples
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Ross Bagurdes. And in this video, we're going to be covering subnetting examples. So you already have your subnetting workbook out. If you don't make sure you print it off. And if you haven't yet, you'll definitely need to through Intro to Subnetting before you start the subnetting examples. Unless, of course, you just want to learn my method of subnetting, and you have a good grasp of subnetting already, you just want to go through the binary part of it. You can probably cruise through this. However, if you're not familiar with subnetting, I highly recommend going through Intro to Subnetting first before diving into this somewhat messy binary, if you don't know how we're starting off.

Variable Length Subnet Masking (VLSM)
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this video we'll be covering variable length subnet masking, or VLSM. Now, VLSM is more traditionally called just subnetting, it's the type of subnetting we use in our regular everyday networks. The idea here is that the length of our subnet mask can vary. How's that for reiterating what the title of my video is here? What we did in the past with subnetting in the lessons so far, is we figured out how to calculate different subnetworks from a larger network address that's given to us by our ISP by simply dividing it up into equivalent number of hosts per network for a finite set of networks. So we said there was network requirements were eight networks, or 16 networks, or 500 networks. And then we assume that every number of all the hosts on each of those networks were identical. In variable links subnet masking, we take a different approach to that and that is, instead of figuring out what our needs are for the number of network perspective, we actually tackle the problem from the number of hosts perspective.

Route Summarization
Welcome to TrainSignal, I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this video we're going to be covering Route Summarization. Now, Route Summarization is a tool that we can use to actually be more efficient with how we write static routes, and building the routing table in general in a router. Whether we're using static routes, or some dynamic routing protocol. So let's dive into this with a Scenario. Because hopefully by now you've spent all the time learning IP addressing and subnetting. So that we can jump into this and it'll be pretty easy.

Introduction to OSPF
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Ross Bagurdes and this is the Introduction to OSPF or Open Shortest Path First. Now OSPF is a really robust, sophisticated, complex, scalable, Dynamic routing protocol that's very heavily used in industry. It's one of my favorites, it uses some really cool terminology to describe it, but that's not why it's my favorite. We can get some really outstanding performance out of it, and it's not too complicated to understand, even though it's an incredibly sophisticated protocol. One of the challenges we run into as newbies in data networking, is that we have to find a way to introduce these Dynamic routing protocols, without overwhelming you with all of the nitpicky details about how these routing protocols work. So what I'm going to do here is, I'm going to give you the bare bones basics to introduce you to OSPF. So we can have kind of an understanding of how it works, but what you will get out of it is you'll get an understanding of how to configure it and verify its operation. Later on, in another video when we do advanced OSPF, I'll show you more information about how OSPF works on a bit more of a detailed level. For the time being, let's dive into the basic of OSPF operation. And let's see if we can get a Dynamic routing protocol working in our lab, so that we can ping all of our devices, and we then do not need to configure our static routes.