Network Services for Cisco CCDP ARCH (300-320)

In this course, you'll learn foundational knowledge of/gain the ability to design network services. This includes the design aspects of QoS, network management, and multicast.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Feb 22, 2018
Duration
1h 15m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Feb 22, 2018
Duration
1h 15m
Description

This is the first course of the Cisco CCDP ARCH (300-320) path. In this course, Network Services for Cisco CCDP ARCH (300-320), you'll learn foundational knowledge of/gain the ability to design network services. First, you will learn QoS strategies and policy design. Next, you'll learn network management techniques. Finally, you'll learn multicast concepts and design techniques. When you're finished with this course, you will have the skills and knowledge of network services needed to design networks and be on your way to passing the Cisco CCDP exam.

About the author
About the author

Josh is a network consultant who has travelled around the world to ply his trade. He holds an MS in Applied Information from the University of Oregon, as well as the coveted Cisco CCIE, the ISC2 CISSP, and an array of other IT certifications.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi, everyone. My name is Joshua Burman and welcome to my course, Network Services for Cisco CCDP ARCH (300-320). I am a Cisco Certified Internet working expert, an Independant Network Consultant at Convergency Consulting, LLC. In this course we are going to discuss the major design aspects for various network services. Some of the major topics that we will cover include; the fundamentals of Quality of Service design, the key aspects of network management design, an explanation of multicast routing concepts and the basics of designing multicast surfaces. By the end of this course you'll have an intermediate level of network services design knowledge Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with basic network design at a Cisco Certified Design Associate or CCDA level. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn Network Services design concepts with the Network Services for CCDP ARCH 300-320 course at Pluralsight.

Network Management Techniques
Hello and welcome everybody. My name is Joshua Burman, CCIE number 28039. This module is on network management techniques. It is part of the Network Services course for the Cisco Certified Design Professional ARCH exam 300-320. In this module we will cover the following areas. In-band management, out-of-band management, some popular management protocols, prioritizing and protecting your management traffic, and segmenting your management networks. Let's get started. You can divide a typical network device into two core functions, the control plane and the data or forwarding plane. The control plane is the primary control center for the device. It performs all the functions of management and control. This includes everything that is not user traffic like routing protocols. When we connect to a device using a management tool such as TELNET or SSH, we are accessing that device's control plane, also sometimes referred to as the management plane. The data or forwarding plane consists of specialized ASICs or processes that have specific functions such as forwarding user traffic between the interfaces.

Multicast Routing Concepts
Hello, and welcome everybody. My name is Joshua Burman, CCIE number 28039. This module is on Multicast Routing Concepts. It is part of the Network Services course for the Cisco Certified Design Professional ARCH exam 300-320. In this particular module, Multicast Routing Concepts, you will learn about the following topics. What is Multicast and what are its uses? Multicast Addressing, Internet Group Management Protocol, Protocol Independent Multicast to include modes, rendezvous points, multicast trees, and reverse path forwarding. Also, Multicast security and a multicast use case. Let's get started. To understand why we need Multicast, we must first understand why both Unicast and Broadcast can be inefficient for sending traffic to multiple receivers. With Unicast a single sender can send a stream to multiple receivers, but it must create a unique stream for each receiver. When you have multiple receivers behind a single router it can be very inefficient because multiple copies of the same packets are being sent down the same path. With broadcast, send the traffic to all possible receivers on a LAN. Broadcasts will not travel across a router by default so the two other receivers on the right will never receive the transmission. This makes broadcasting a poor solution for sending traffic to multiple receivers on a routed network. So how do we efficiently send traffic to multiple receivers? The answer is Multicast. Multicast requires a sender to only send its stream a single time while the downstream routers replicate the traffic to multiple receivers. This creates what is called a Multicast distribution tree.