Cisco CCNA: Advanced Ethernet and File Management

In this course, part 3 of 3 in the Cisco ICND2 (200-101) series, we cover switch loop prevention, enhancing Spanning Tree Protocol convergence, as well as file management, IOS upgrades, and password recovery.
Course info
Rating
(91)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 21, 2013
Duration
4h 53m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(91)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Oct 21, 2013
Duration
4h 53m
Description

In a switched networked environment, which currently dominates enterprise business, we need to provide a quick converging, and loop free layer 2 network. This involves understanding Spanning Tree Protocol, which is a simple solution to prevent layer 2 loops, yet can create complex topologies, and potentially a slow converging network, which can cause issues for our users. We will look at how Spanning Tree Protocol operates, and then examine how it converges on a real network. Then we dive into looking at how we can modify the Spanning Tree Protocol topology and improve performance. Additionally, we will perform an IOS upgrade on a router and a switch, and even cover how to fix an upgrade gone awry. Also, you will learn how to change the password on a router or a switch when you do not know the password.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

File Management
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and in this video we're going to talk about File Management. Now file management on Cisco devices can be tricky, and at the same time it actually can be incredibly useful to make use of and compare configuration files on your device. In addition to that, one of the files that we're going to be working with today is actually the iOS image itself, the operating system itself. And we're going to learn how to upgrade that iOS image in this File Management video. So let's dive in.

Configuring The Root Bridge and PortFast
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this video, we're going to take a look at spanning tree protocol, specifically configuring the root bridge and PortFast. Now with configuring the root bridge, what we can do is we can change that priority field of our bridge ID to allow for one bridge, or one switch, to always become the root bridge. And then second, we're going to take a look at PortFast. Now PortFast is a way to improve the performance of our spanning tree protocol environment by allowing our workstations to connect to our switches much, much faster.

STP Topology Changes, PVST, and RSTP
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and in this video we're going to take a look at spanning tree protocol, topology changes, as well as per-VLAN spanning tree and rapid spanning tree protocol. Now topology changes in spanning tree protocol can take a very long time, so we want to take a look at how that happens and what we can do about it in our network. Secondly, we're going to take a look at per-VLAN spanning tree, which is really just spanning tree protocol, but we do it per-VLAN, and I want to do a demonstration for you so you can see that we can modify spanning tree protocol behavior for each VLAN that we have. At last, we're going to take a look at rapid spanning tree protocol, which is an enhancement to spanning tree protocol such that it converges much, much faster. So now let's take a look at how spanning tree handles topology changes. Ultimately, spanning tree was devised to prevent loops, but in addition to that, spanning tree is designed to re-converge upon the event of a link failure. And this is actually a good thing because we can get spanning tree to re-converge for us so that if a link goes down, we can change the state of other ports and other links to go from the blocking state to a forwarding state and actually maintain our topology and allow our network traffic to continue. It's to say that this doesn't cause its own set of problems, but let's take a look at how this works.

Switchport Aggregation and The Layer 3 Switch
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and in this video, we're going to discuss Switchport Aggregation, as well as the Layer 3 Switch. I get so many questions about Layer 3 switches, what a mystery this is, what on earth is a Layer 3 switch, and I'm going to demystify it for you as best as possible. But before we get to that, let's talk about switch port aggregation because it's actually a pretty cool topic. So, switch port aggregation, what we're doing is we're taking multiple switch ports and we're bonding them together to act as one switch port. So we're taking multiple switch ports and we're causing them to work together as an aggregated link. So we take multiple, let's say Fast Ethernet ports, and we can bundle them together and connect it to another switch and then all of those connections going from switch to switch can operate as one link. Well, initially we looked at this when we talked about broadcast storms. And remember with a broadcast store, whenever we have two links setup like this and we send broadcast messages into our environment, the broadcast messages just keep propagating around that loop and they eventually shut the loop down. So we cannot effectively connect two switches together with two cables without having to block one of the ports to stop that broadcast storm.