CompTIA A+ Part 1: Computer Hardware

Part 1 of 3 in the CompTIA A+ 220-801 series covers all the essential information you need to get started with a career as a computer technician.
Course info
Rating
(927)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 18, 2013
Duration
5h 24m
Table of contents
CompTIA A+ 220-801 (2012 Objectives)
Motherboards
Processors
Random Access Memory
Expansion Cards
Storage Devices
Connection Interfaces and Devices
Power Supplies
The System BIOS
Display Devices (Monitors)
Customized Systems
Description
Course info
Rating
(927)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 18, 2013
Duration
5h 24m
Description

Part 1 of 3 in the CompTIA A+ 220-801 series covers all the essential information you need to get started with a career as a computer technician. In this course, you will learn to install operating systems, perform preventative maintenance, and develop networking, security, and troubleshooting skills. No prerequisite knowledge or experience is required. If you are brand new to IT, don't have any formal computer hardware or software training, or are looking to change careers, this course is a great place to start.

About the author
About the author

Ed Liberman has worked in technology for over 20 years. He has been certified and instructing IT since 1998. He has helped thousands of people to get started or advance their careers in the IT industry.

More from the author
More courses by Ed Liberman
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Processors
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on Processors. Now when we talk about processors, you know I mentioned in a previous lesson, in the motherboards lesson, that this thing called the CPU, the Central Processing Unit, and I said or what's more simply referred to as a processor. Well that's what we're going to talk about here. And we also talked about how the processor is kind of like the brains of the computer. Right, if we're going to analogize it to the human, right, we were saying that the processor is the brains and the motherboard was the heart. So here we're going to talk about the brains. So that's where all the computations take place, right or all the processing takes place, right, the processing of information. Alright so that's what this lesson is going to be all about. Now here's the thing, I will tell you that this information is not always the most exciting of information and the reason why, if you think about it, well teaching you how a processor works is kind of like teaching you how a brain works. And for most people that's not the most exciting information. I mean I suppose unless you're a brain surgeon, right, then you find it very exciting. So if you are coming into this formally as a brain surgeon or maybe you're currently a brain surgeon and you just want to learn how computers work, well then this is the exciting information. But for most people it's not the most exciting so I'm going to try to keep this kind of short and to the point so that we can move along. It's kind of necessary information, but I don't want to have it long and boring.

Random Access Memory
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on Random Access Memory or what we could simplify by just saying RAM, right, R A M, RAM. And some people will simplify it even further by just saying memory. Now the concern I have with saying memory is well there's different types of memory in a computer system and so it can get confusing, but more often than not if somebody just says, how much memory does your computer have? They're talking about how much RAM you have in your computer. Now I will tell you that RAM is another one of these vitally important components, pretty much a mandatory component, in order to make a computer function. Okay, so we've previously learned that we have a motherboard, which is like the heart and we have the processor, which is like the brains. Okay so now we have memory and I don't know what I would analogize this to. It's probably a component of the brain, I suppose. I don't know. But it is something that pretty much is required to make a computer work these days.

Expansion Cards
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on expansion cards. Now when it comes to expansion cards really what we need to talk about is, if we think back to the motherboards lesson, we talked about expansion slots. Well, this lesson is going to be kind of a short and to the point lesson where we're going to talk about all the different types of cards that we can put into those slots. Now before we get into the different types of cards there is one thing I, I would like to point out, and that is that this expansion capability. Although in the old days, it was always in the form of cards in slots, all right? So we actually had a separate adapter card. We now have two options. In some cases, we'll have integrated chips on the motherboard for all of these various things that we're going to take a look at. There could be a chip on the motherboard that kind of hardwires the functionality right into the motherboard and then, you know, we'll have the circuitry and then we'll just have a port on the back of the motherboard for that functionality. Or we still can move to a separate adapter card.

Power Supplies
Welcome to TrainSignal, you're watching a lesson on power supplies. Now, real quick before we get in and look at the, the actual power supplies themselves, there are some basics of electricity. So, this can be kind of like electricity 101 here that we need to go through. You need to understand certain concepts first. So the first term really that I want you to know about is something called voltage, okay, or sometimes we just say volts. Volts have to do with the force of electricity, how powerful, how forceful the electricity is. A couple examples I have here is, this would be an example of a very low amount of force, right, the water is just kind of trickling out of these pipes. Whereas, here we have a high amount of force. We have the, the water is just thrusting out of the pipe, really hard. 'Kay, and that would be example of voltage. When you see that something is low or high voltage, when it comes to electricity, it's, the amount of strength, of the power, the force of that energy.

Display Devices (Monitors)
Welcome to Trainsignal. You're watching a lesson on display devices. Now, when we talk about display devices, it's very difficult not to also talk about the term, monitors, okay? because a monitor is, well, the primary form of display device, all right? So, what I'd like to do here is, kind of go through an overview of monitors, and what some of the terminology is, and how they work. So first of all, a monitor is the primary output device for a computer. Now we spent a lot of time talking about various input devices on a computer, right? You have things like keyboards and mice. Those are input devices, all right? Because we perform actions and it sends a signal into the computer, Telling it to do something. Whereas the monitor is the computer now trying to communicate back to us, the human. Okay? And so it displays things out on the monitor. Now in order to use a monitor, it requires a video card, which is also sometimes referred to as a video adapter, video controller, graphics adapter. And this is something that we actually talked about in the expansion cards lesson.