CompTIA A+ Part 3: Peripherals and Best Practices

This is Part 3 of 3 in the CompTIA A+ 220-801 series. This introductory course covers all the essential information you need to get started with a career as a computer technician.
Course info
Rating
(193)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 18, 2013
Duration
4h 4m
Table of contents
Using SOHO Devices
Laptops
Printers
Computer Safety
Environmental Control Practices
Professional Practices
Incident Response and Documentation
Preparing for Your CompTIA A+ 220-801 Certification Exam
Next Steps
Description
Course info
Rating
(193)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jul 18, 2013
Duration
4h 4m
Description

This is Part 3 of 3 in the CompTIA A+ 220-801 series. This introductory course covers all the essential information you need to get started with a career as a computer technician. In this course, you will learn to install operating systems, perform preventative maintenance, and develop networking, security, and troubleshooting skills. No prerequisite knowledge or experience is required. If you are brand new to IT, don't have any formal computer hardware or software training, or are looking to change careers, this course is a great place to start.

About the author
About the author

Ed Liberman has worked in technology for over 20 years. He has been certified and instructing IT since 1998. He has helped thousands of people to get started or advance their careers in the IT industry.

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More courses by Ed Liberman
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Using SOHO Devices
Welcome to Trainsignal, you're watching a lesson on using SOHO devices. Now SOHO, what does that mean? S-O-H-O, what does that stand for? Well it stands for Small Office Home Office, okay? So it means just that, it means there are certain devices that are explicitly designed for the very small office, or possibly even like a home network or home office type environment. Some of the most typical devices would be your cable or DSL internet routers, and that's actually what I have here today that I'm gonna demonstrate for you. This entire lesson, what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna jump over, and we are going to look at how to set up a Linksys router that I have set up here in my home office. Okay so let's go ahead and take a look, and we'll go from there.

Laptops
Welcome to TrainSignal. Your lesson on laptops. And it's interesting that we call it laptops here in the lesson, and I've done so pretty much because the CompTIA Objectives also refers to everything as laptops. But in the industry, it's actually been brought up of late that we don't wanna call them laptops anymore. We don't use them on our laps the way we used to. Now they're very often referred to as notebooks, although notebooks can be very specific also because then there's other types of laptop devices like netbooks, which are smaller versions. There are also tablets, which are another form of portable computing. And so as a whole, laptops, they have a number of different names as a whole, we're just gonna say that they're portable computing devices. And heck, these days we're even getting into the point where even cell phones are becoming portable computing devices. But getting back to the term laptops, right? I mean, that's what they're called in the objectives, that's what we're gonna call them here. We're gonna look at all sorts of different aspects of these particular devices.

Environmental Control Practices
Welcome to TrainSignal! You're watching a lesson on environmental control practices. Now in a previous lesson, we were actually just talking about computer safety, and as part of that computer safety, we were talking about keeping the computer components safe, and we really only talked about one form of computer component safety, and that was electrostatic discharge, but the reality is that through the use of environmental control we can also help keep our computer equipment safe, keep it functioning properly, and I suppose, along with that, we could say that will also help with human safety, right? Because if we were to create an unsafe environment, and maybe then create a fire or something like that, well that could be dangerous to humans as well. So, here we're gonna talk about keeping the environment of our computers and our computer equipment under control and appropriate for their needs.

Professional Practices
Welcome to TrainSignal, you're watching a lesson on Professional Practices. Now I have to tell you going into this lesson (laughs) I know we've learned a lot of technical stuff in this course. We've learned about motherboards and memory and processors and all kinds of fun stuff like that, and it's a lesson like this that, if you're listening to me right now, well, first of all let me commend you on even starting this lesson because some people will just skip it. They just don't care, they don't care about customer service they don't care about acting professional or it may not be that they don't care about doing it, they just feel they don't need to be taught how to do it, and I have to tell you that this lesson is one of the most important lessons to me for that exact reason. The number of IT professionals who think that they don't need to be taught how to act professionally is a big problem. Now it's not as much of a problem today as it was years ago. Right, in the old days IT professionals were very arrogant, egotistical, self-involved people. That was the personality, as a matter of fact, there's even been various jokes and skits that have been done, so we had to push real hard to teach computer professionals how to take on the professionalism and the customer service skills that all the other professions take on. So we're going to just talk about a little bit here and we'll try not to go on too long with this, we'll keep this short and to the point, but I want you to understand that it is important.

Incident Response and Documentation
Welcome to Train Signal. You're watching a lesson on incidence response and documentation. And you know what? Could there be any less interesting a lesson than talking about documentation of any kind? I just kind of start off by saying that, because, well, that is the general consensus. People don't like to talk about documentation. People don't like to do documentation. I'm included in that. I'm terrible with documentation. So I can teach the way it's supposed to be done, and this is probably one of the best examples of something that I don't always practice what I preach. It's not intentional. It's not. . . I just always make the mistake, but I do my best to teach you so you don't make the same mistakes. So I'm gonna keep this kind of short and to the point. This is, it's something that's not part of the company objectives. It's also something that, truthfully, is a lot more important than people think it is. Honestly, the people who do deal with this stuff, especially if you end up being a security manager or something like that, dealing with incidence responses and the documentation. They actually, they make quite a bit of money. They are well are well respected IT professionals, but it's definitely a certain breed who take on those jobs. So, anyway, let's go ahead and jump into it here and

Next Steps
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching the very final lesson. Yeah! We got through it -- In this course which we simply call Next Steps and the idea behind this particular lesson is well I just would like to quickly I guess congratulate you on making it through the course but then also maybe give you some advice on well, what do you do now? Right? I mean a lot of people they get through the material and they say well now what? Right? I mean you kind of knew what to do all the way through the course. You're going through it and you watch one lesson, you watch another lesson and maybe you go back and watch a lesson and you study this and you do practice questions and so on and so forth but now what? Well let's talk about this a little bit.