CompTIA Linux+ (2010 Objectives): Part 1

Part 1 of 2 in the CompTIA Linux+ (2010 Objectives) series. In this course, you'll learn the basics of Linux technology.
Course info
Rating
(196)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 30, 2010
Duration
5h 36m
Table of contents
Getting Started with CompTIA Linux+ Training
Lab Setup
The Course Scenario
Linux Hardware Settings
The Boot Process
Runlevels, System Shutdown, and Reboot
Linux Installation Planning
Package Management
GNU and Unix Commands
Linux Filesystem
Managing User Resources: Quotas and Permissions
Linux Links and System Files
Preparing for Your CompTIA Linux+ Certification Exam (LX0-101)
Description
Course info
Rating
(196)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Nov 30, 2010
Duration
5h 36m
Description

Part 1 of 2 in the CompTIA Linux+ (2010 Objectives) series. In this course, you'll learn the basics of Linux technology. You'll work to develop system architecture, work with GNU and Unix commands, and learn about Linux file systems. This course is ideal for those who have some understanding of IT fundamentals but are new to Linux. Network+ and A+ certifications are recommended to get the most out of this course, but not required.

About the author
About the author

Veronica Henry is an experienced technology professional turned freelance technology writer and entrepreneur.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Getting Started with CompTIA Linux+ Training
Hi, and welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Veronica Henry, and you're watching Getting Started with CompTIA Linux+ Training Course. In this lesson, I'll start off with what I promise will be a brief introduction about who I am, then I'll explain what we'll be doing in this course, things like the setup, the types of material we'll be covering, and then we'll wrap up with my thoughts on how you should use this course to get the maximum benefit, whether your ultimate goal is increasing your skill set or pursuing certification.

Lab Setup
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Veronica Henry, and you're watching Lab Setup. In this lesson, I'll start off with a look at my lab environment. This will help you understand the basic setup of my machine. We'll look at the hardware, software, and settings, so that you get an initial idea of how your old lab environment might look. Then we'll talk about VirtualBox. This is the software from Oracle that allows you to setup what is called a virtual machine on your system. Then we'll go over how to create our very own Linux virtual machine.

The Course Scenario
Welcome to TrainSignal. I'm Veronica Henry, and you're watching The Course Scenario. Now that you understand what to expect from our training course, and you also have your lab environment set up, next I'll introduce you to Globomantics, Inc. They're undergoing some challenging, yet exciting, changes. And after we talk about that, we'll review their network setup. Let's get started. I've found that nothing helps illustrate a point better than a tangible example. So in this course, we're going to use a fictitious company called Globomantics, so let's talk a little bit about who they are, and the exciting changes happening at their organization. Globomantics, Inc. is a national application development company, and they specialize in business software. Though their corporate headquarters is in Dallas, Texas, they have many clients and are building strongly in the Northeast, so combined with growing travel expenses, the new CIO has decided to start a new satellite office in New York. Globomantics is a small company. They have 500 employees, the majority of which sit in Dallas, Texas, but they do have a mobile salesforce of about 10 people, and 100 employees who telecommute from home, mostly from across the state of Texas, but with a few scattered around the U. S. Globomantics has lost their CIO to a competitor, and the new CIO is a huge Linux fan. So, one of his first projects is to convert the entire shop from Windows to Linux, both servers and desktops. Pretty ambitious for a first project, don't you think? Well, despite some grumbling from seasoned Windows administrators, the CIO is pressing forward, and he wants to implement a training program designed to update the skills of the Windows administrators, while also preparing them for Linux+ certification. This training will also be used for new hires.

The Boot Process
Hello and welcome to TrainSignal. You are watching a lesson about the Linux Boot Process. We began our study delving into the inner workings of your Linux system's hardware settings. It may have seemed like an unusual place to start, but this critical information will serve as a much needed building block upon which our future lessons are based. Throughout this course, you'll find that our subject matter will fit neatly into one of two categories, hardware or software. One cannot function without the other, so as an administrator or user, your time, whether it's installation, troubleshooting, or just general systems maintenance, will fall into one of these two camps. Along these lines, one of the most important concepts is to understand how the Linux operating system boots up. This is one of those instances where Linux is decidedly different from Windows. The first Linux distribution that I tried was Mandrake, and that's known today as Mandriva. Now coming from the Windows graphical environment at the time, those unrecognizable characters and driver names that scrolled across the screen looked pretty much like a foreign language to me. But today, most distributions do a good job of hiding those messages. But there are some gems in those messages that may prove quite helpful when trying to troubleshoot issues with your computer. So in this lesson we'll start with a look at the Linux BIOS, and that's the program that initiates the boot process when you power on your system. We'll continue with the boot loader, which essentially takes a handoff from the BIOS and continues along with the boot process. Then we'll move onto the boot sequence, the steps that are performed during the boot process. Next, to view those boot messages I mentioned, we'll take a look at the kernel ring buffer and log file boot events. First up, the BIOS.

Runlevels, System Shutdown, and Reboot
Hello, and welcome to TrainSignal. You are watching a lesson about Linux runlevels and system shutdown and reboot. For me, one of the most difficult aspects of learning a new operating system was the differences in terminology. I'd spent years learning the filenames, commands, utilities, and other OS related terms of Windows, and they were firmly ingrained in my mind. The challenge, then, was to assimilate new information, retain the old, and to make sure that I didn't mix up the two. Linux has its fair share of, shall I say, unique sounding terminology. So when I first heard the term runlevel, my eyebrows knit together in concentration, wondering what on earth a runlevel was? I can guarantee you that the concept isn't nearly so intimidating as it sounds. In this lesson, we'll define runlevels, and you'll see that there is a similar concept in Windows. We'll talk about the different runlevel services, the tools used to manage them, and how to easily check and change your current runlevel. As usual, along the way we'll do some demonstrations to help reinforce the material. So fire up a terminal window, which of course should be second nature to you by now, right? Ready? Good, let's get started.

Linux Installation Planning
Hello, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson about Linux Installation Planning. Your Linux tool belt is probably feeling a little heavier than when we started. It should now include knowledge of hardware settings, the boot process, and how runlevels determine what mode you'll run the Linux kernel in. Hopefully you spent some time really digesting this information, because now we'll move onto other topics, namely the hard disk. If you're an administrator, chances are you'll inherit an already functioning Linux installation, but just like the new Linux user, at some point, you'll probably need to install the operating system from scratch. And where will this software be installed? Why, of course, on your system's hard disk. We know that the most basic function of a hard disk is to store our data for retrieval when we need to use it. So as we consider a new Linux installation, we need to begin thinking about the most efficient way to organize that data. Now while you could theoretically whip out an installation disk and plunge ahead, it's best to take some time to understand the layout of the disk and how to best customize your configuration. That's where we'll spend our time in this lesson. As part of the installation process, you'll install what's called a Boot Manager, which we touched on in the Boot Process lesson. This is the screen that you and your users will see when your systems boot up. Then we'll talk about shared libraries and how they make Linux run like a well-oiled machine. If you're ready, let's begin with the hard disk layout.

Package Management
Hello and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson about Package Management. There's a lot to love about Linux. It's free, it's developed and maintained by an international community of really talented folks, and it puts the power to tweak the operating system back into the hands of the user, if she chooses, that is. But one of the things I love most about Linux is the sheer volume of software packages available, largely for free. So in the beginning, I spent, and in truth still spend, quite a bit of time downloading, evaluating, and testing software. Such is the way I choose to spend far too large a chunk of my free time. So as you probably already deduced, a Linux package is just a piece of software. Now there are times when you may install directly from code, but most often, you'll install the precompiled, preconfigured piece of package software, and Linux has developed a tool that allows you to install, remove, upgrade, and otherwise tinker with this software, and this is called a package manager. Unsurprisingly, there are tons of package managers available, but there are only two most common ones that you'll need to focus on, RPM and Debian. In this lesson, we'll talk about the vital role of package managers, then we'll take an in-depth look at Debian, and it's associated tools, aptitude and app, along with some configuration and troubleshooting options. Then we'll do the same for RPM and its associated tool, Yum. If you're ready, let's begin with an overview of software packages.

GNU and Unix Commands
Hello, and welcome to TrainSignal. You are watching a lesson about GNU and Unix commands. Unix is an early operating system dating back to the late 60s that spawned Linux, and though Linux has grown and spawned variants of its own, much of the Unix legacy remains. You'll find this evident not only in the file system, but also in the commands. GNU, and there is some debate around the correct pronunciation of this term too, is an acronym for GNU's Not Unix! It was launched in 1984 to develop a free, Unix-like operating system. What started out as GNU Linux has been shortened to just Linux. Unix was a command line-based operating system, and though modern Linux distributions feature a GUI interface, as we've learned over the last several lessons, the real power rests behind the scenes at the command line. Now while regular users may spend very little time looking around in such unknown waters, the command line is where an administrator must thrive. So in this lesson, we'll take a closer look at the command line, we'll review text streams and filters that alter command line output, then we'll take a look at basic file management commands, and pipes and redirects which are used to manipulate input and output. Next, we'll review how to identify and control Linux processes, how to use regular expressions, and wrap up with a look at Linux's Vi text editor. Let's get started with the Linux command line.

Linux Filesystem
Hello and welcome to TrainSignal. You are watching a lesson about Linux Filesystems. The first Linux operating system that I decided to use full time was Ubuntu. My laptop at that time was struggling under the stress of Windows Vista and in terrible need of relief. The first time I installed Ubuntu, I downloaded the image, burned it onto a CD, and pretty much let the install take care of things for me from there. But as we've learned, it's often a good idea to segment your hard drive, putting directories like home and swap on their own partition. So I backed up my data and bravely started all over again. During our Linux installation lesson, we touched on the subject of partitions. In this lesson, we'll cover how to create partitions, and what the associated filesystem types are. And as all filesystems require a little love and care, we'll talk about how to do some maintenance and integrity tasks. Finally we'll review how to mount and unmount a filesystem. Let's get started with how to create partitions and filesystems.

Managing User Resources: Quotas and Permissions
Hello, and welcome to TrainSignal. You are watching Managing User Resources: Quotas and Permissions. It's not uncommon today to see laptops with over 150 GB of hard disk space, and even more on desktops. Still, even as users store larger amounts of data, the possibility of exhausting your hard disk space always looms nearby. If you apply that to an Enterprise setting, you can see where the need might arise to monitor and control how much hard disk space your users can have. So in this lesson, we'll talk about how Linux handles disk quotas, and how you can implement them on your own network. Managing your user data also involves setting permissions for what they have access to. In Linux, this is handled with file permissions and ownership. We'll review how file ownership is determined, how to change it, and how to set the permissions that determine who can access those files. Let's start first with disk quotas.

Linux Links and System Files
Hello and welcome to TrainSignal. You are watching Linux Links and System Files. Over the last several lessons, we learned about how Linux interacts with hardware, how the system boots, partitions, filesystems, and a slew of other system details, but that all shouldn't overshadow the importance of understanding how and where to find your files. Now, you've probably spent many years in Windows learning its filesystem and directory structure, and unfortunately, much of it isn't going to apply to Linux. However, what that knowledge does is makes it easier for you to understand the importance of a standardized directory structure. So in this lesson, we'll begin with a look at the two types of links in Linux, then we'll take a look at the system files, and their locations. Finally, we'll review the tools available to help you search and locate files and directories. Let's start off first with links.

Preparing for Your CompTIA Linux+ Certification Exam (LX0-101)
Hello, and welcome to TrainSignal. You are watching Preparing for Your Linux+ Certification Exam. So you've made it. You've completed all the lessons, practiced the commands, and may have even destroyed and had to rebuild your testing machine. Congratulations on this essential rite of passage. In this lesson, we'll take a moment to go over a few things to help prepare you for the testing and certification process. First we'll provide an overview of the exam, with the number of questions, scoring, and the like. Then we'll tell you where to schedule and take the exam, and discuss what to do if you need to retake it. Then we'll cover a few exam tips and tell you how to obtain your certification credentials after you've passed both exams.