CompTIA Mobility+ Part 1: Over-the-Air and Network Infrastructure

Part 1 of 3 in the Comptia Mobility+ series. In this course, we will cover the subject of mobile devices and over-the-air technologies.
Course info
Rating
(70)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 24, 2013
Duration
5h 18m
Table of contents
Exam MB0-001 CompTIA Mobility+
An RF Primer
Cellular Technology
Network Topologies
Network Technology
Wireless Technology
Security and Quality of Service
The OSI Model
TCP/IP in a Nutshell
TCP/IP Ports, Sockets, and More
Disaster Recovery
Description
Course info
Rating
(70)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 24, 2013
Duration
5h 18m
Description

Part 1 of 3 in the Comptia Mobility+ series. In this course, we will cover the subject of mobile devices and over-the-air technologies. We will also cover mobile device management, troubleshooting, security, network infrastructure.

About the author
About the author

During his 20+ years in the IT industry, John has enjoyed the opportunity to work as a consultant, architect, executive, speaker, and author.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

An RF Primer
Hello. This is John O'Neill Sr. from TrainSignal, and in this lesson we will be taking a look a the basics of radio frequency, better known as RF. Well, I'm pretty excited to get going, so let's get to it. When we begin our discussion of radio frequency, we need two think about waves. And I don't mean waves at the beach. I mean electromagnetic waves. And RF waves are a form of electromagnetic radiation, and electromagnetic radiation is found in the EM or electromagnetic spectrum. And the EM spectrum contains all the forms of electromagnetic radiation, everything from frequencies below radio all the way up to frequencies of gamma rays. And if you remember, gamma rays are those things that turn Bruce Banner into the incredible hulk. They're an incredibly powerful forms of radiation. And between there we have x-rays, microwaves, we even have visible light because that's all part of the EM spectrum. Now, the radio frequency section of the EM spectrum is located from 0 up to about 3000 GHz. That may seem like a very wide range, but when you're talking about the EM spectrum it's a pretty small slice.

Cellular Technology
Hello. This is John O'Neill Sr. from TrainSignal, and one of the biggest drivers of mobility today is cellular. From cellular networks to cellular technology, cellular as a whole is really driving the push for anywhere computing. In this lesson, we will be discussing a number of different areas of cellular technology and how they enable, how they empower the mobility push.

Network Topologies
Hello there. This is John O'Neill Sr. from TrainSignal, and in this lesson we are going to be discussing network topologies, what they are, and why they impact us in the study of mobility. So, what exactly is a network topology? Well, maybe you've heard of the word topography or a topographic map. That's a detailed map of a given area or a given region. It shows elevations and all sorts of the different features of the surface of that area or of that given area. In fact, topo kind of means place or it comes from the Greek word that means place, and topology, network topology is very similar. It is a description or a detailed mapping of the arrangement or layout of the various components and things that make up a network. So, when you take all your printers and your switches and your wireless access points and your laptops and tablets and phones and PCs and all of that and you arrange it and connect it together, that is the network topology. So, as I'm sure you've already guessed, there are a number of different possible network topologies because there are a number of different ways that you could interconnect all your network components, and this also depends on how many network components you have. So, as you can see in the graphic where we have all the little steel balls and then we connect them together with rods, how we connect them together and what connects to what define the topology or the layout of the network.

Network Technology
Hello. This is John O'Neill Sr. from TrainSignal, and since we've just taken a look at how networks are laid out and the topologies that describe how everything is connected to everything else, I think this is a great opportunity to take a look at all of the gadgets and gizmos and devices that are used to make up a network. So, prepare yourself for a great look at all the network tech that is used to build a modern network. With that, let's get to it!

The OSI Model
Hello again. This is John O'Neill Sr. , and as always I'm here to lead you through an exciting and always titillating discussion on various IT topics. Today's topic will be the OSI Model. We've mentioned this in a number of other lessons in the course, and now it's time to dive into the details and make you an expert of all things related to the OSI Model. So, with that, let's get to it. What exactly is the Open Systems Interconnect Model or OSI Model? Well, great question. It's a model developed by the International Organization for Standardization or International Standards Organization known as ISO that describes a layered network approach. This approach defines a number of standards of how things will communicate over a network and ultimately shows how data moves from one device to another or one application to another across the network.

TCP/IP Ports, Sockets, and More
Well, have you had a chance to take a breather and let all that great information from the TCP/IP in a nutshell lesson set in? I sure hope so because I'm John O'Neill Sr. from TrainSignal, and we are just about to dive into the TCP/IP ports, sockets, protocols such as NAT or UDP and give you a great rounded out idea of what TCP/IP is all about. This will finish off our discussion of TCP/IP, but it's a foundation for the rest of this course and very important for those who are pursuing the CompTIA Mobility Plus certification.