Networking Concepts and Protocols

Networking concepts can be overwhelming and require a precision with which they need to be understood. This course will teach you the fundamentals of data networking in a language accessible to a novice technical user.
Course info
Rating
(84)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 20, 2018
Duration
5h 26m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introduction to Networking
The OSI Model
Protocols and Port Numbers
TCP and UDP
Introduction to Binary and Hexadecimal
Introduction to IP Addressing
Subnetting Networks
Introduction to IPv6
Ethernet and Switching
Switching Features
IP Routing
Network Services
Description
Course info
Rating
(84)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Apr 20, 2018
Duration
5h 26m
Description

Listening to a data network engineer speak about the equipment, maintenance, and operation of a networked system can often feel like you are listening to a foreign language. Although data networking hardware is not remarkably different in operation to your desktop computer, it’s application and configuration requires the implementation of protocols to ensure data moves from one device to another device, quickly and without error. In this course, Networking Concepts and Protocols, you will learn how the most important protocols on the Internet, like IP, TCP, and HTTP work together to deliver a web page from a server on the Internet to your desktop’s web browser. First, you will learn the secrets of the IP address. Next, you will learn the most important rules to help you understand if two devices can communicate or not. Finally, you will learn to use the OSI model to organize protocols to better understand how they interact with each other. By the end of this course, you will be able to quickly examine network configuration on your workstation and clearly understand the different components.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to my course, Networking Concepts and Protocols. I'm a network engineer with more than 20 years' experience building enterprise networks and teaching people about them. Over the last 10 years, technology has moved from our desks to our pockets and has grown at an exponential rate. All this means that we need talented IT professionals to keep data networks operating so we can surf the web on our smartphones and other devices. In this course, I will introduce you to the fundamental concepts of data networking operation including IP addressing and subnetting, ethernet operation, ports and protocols, and the OSI model, which will provide a framework to organize the networking concepts. By the end of this course, you will understand the relationship between IP addresses and MAC addresses, as well as the difference between a router and a switch. Since this is an introductory course, you only need an open mind and an interest in learning how data networks operate. Since this course is part of a five-part series, you should feel confident moving on to the second course of the series, Introduction to Enterprise Network Infrastructure, upon completion of this first course. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn networking with the Networking Concepts and Protocols course, at Pluralsight.

Introduction to Networking
Hi everyone. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to my course, Networking Concepts and Protocols. And we're going to kick this off with an Introduction to Networking course where we briefly go over what networking is and give you some idea of how we're going to model the rest of the course. So the goals here are going to be to talk about what is networking in and of itself, we're going to understand some networking concepts just very generally speaking without actually talking about protocols yet, we're going to talk about modeling network communication, and we're going to take a look at a telephone conversation and see how we can break down some of the components of it so that we can understand more precisely and describe more precisely what's happening. This will be the foundation for the rest of the course when we talk about how we model network communication to organize the protocols we use, and we can use that organization to then troubleshoot and understand networks more effectively.

The OSI Model
Hi everyone. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to the second module of the Networking Concepts course. This time we're going to talk about the OSI model, or the Open Systems Interconnect model. Our goals this module are to introduce this model of networking, we're going to briefly talk about how we modeled the phone call in the first module of this course, and then we're going to go on and actually take a real networking example and use the OSI model to categorize all of the different processes that are happening when we are using the internet.

Protocols and Port Numbers
Hi everyone. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to Protocols and Port Numbers, specifically protocols at the application layer of the OSI model. So our goals this module are to look at these application layer protocols. I've created some categories here that we don't really use in the real world for these protocols, but it will be useful as we make our way through this module so that we can see some similarities in the protocols that we're working with. We're going to start by looking at data transfer protocols, we'll then move on to authentication protocols, networks service protocols, network management protocols, and some audio/visual protocols.

TCP and UDP
Hi everyone. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and welcome to this next section here about TCP and UDP. Our goals this module are to take a look at these 2 Transport Layer Protocols, these are layer 4 protocols. The first one is Transmission Control Protocol, or TCP, and could easily be argued one of the most important protocols in data networking. The second one here is User Datagram Protocol, or UDP. As we make our way through this course what we're going to do is take a look at each of these protocols. We'll take a look at port numbers as well, and then examine some protocol hierarchy and examine how application layer protocols relate to Transport Layer Protocols, as well as Network Layer Protocols.

Introduction to Binary and Hexadecimal
Hi everyone. I'm Ross Bagurdes, and in these next several modules what we're going to do is take a look at network layer addressing, specifically IPv4 and IPv6 addressing; however, in order to understand what's happening in those addressing schemes, we really need to understand what's happening with binary and hexadecimal. So we're going to take this module here and learn how to convert from decimal to binary and from binary to decimal to hexadecimal. So we're going to introduce the need for binary here and explain a little bit about what happens. We're going to review some primary school mathematics. Yeah, I know that sounds a little awful maybe, but I'm going to make it as easy as possible. We're going to look at how we count in binary. We're going to then convert binary to decimal and decimal to binary. Last, we're going to take a look at how hexadecimal fits into all of this and how useful it is in data networking, especially in IPv6 addressing.

Introduction to IP Addressing
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this next module, we're going to introduce IP addressing. To take a look at what we'll cover in this module, we're going to start by looking at what is an IPv4 address. We'll then go on to describe the distinction between classful addressing, which is kind of arcane and we don't use anymore, and classless addressing, which is pretty much all we use in modern networking. We're going to look at different address types. Now there's lot of ways to categorize addressing. In this case, we're going to look at specifically the practical application of IP address types. Next, we're going to look at a demonstration of how IPv4 addresses work so we can see an example of the rules that we must follow in order to get IPv4 addressing to work in our network.

Subnetting Networks
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this next module we're going to start looking at how we subnet our IP networks. What this means is that we're going to take a large IP network and we're going to break it into smaller IP networks. The goals this module are going to be to review those address types, our network address, host address, and broadcast address. We're then going to break networks into smaller networks. This is called subnetting, and I'll show you the process to do that. We'll take a brief look at how we can do variable length subnet masks and then we'll wrap up and I'll introduce you to another course you can do that's much longer than this module that will really do a deep, deep dive into network layer addressing and subnetting processes. It'll make you a master, guaranteed. Let's start by taking a look at these different address types so that we can really understand the components that we need to know to do subnetting well.

Introduction to IPv6
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This next module, we're going to talk about IP version 6. So our goals this module will be to review the IPv4 address size and then compare it to the IPv6 address size and take a look at how IPv6 addresses are written. Additionally we're going to look at how we can shorten our IPv6 address to make it easier to write and say. Next we're going to take a look at how we can acquire IPv6 addresses on our devices, and then last we're going to take a look at some IPv6 tunneling.

Ethernet and Switching
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. This next module is Ethernet and Ethernet switching. Now Ethernet is prolific in nearly every single network that you are going to see in your career, and Ethernet switches, you're also going to be working with constantly. Our goals this module are to introduce Ethernet and first talk about the foundations of Ethernet, which use these six letters to describe it, which is CSMA/CD. We'll look at how that operates and give us a good introduction into Ethernet. Once we understand what CSMA/CD is, we're going to take a look at collision domains. Now collision domains aren't a big part of modern networks, but it really establishes the history of how Ethernet actually works. So we're going to take a look at what that is. Next, we'll look at the duplex and speed options of Ethernet. We'll take a look at the Ethernet frame, which is the mechanism used to actually move data across a data network using Ethernet. Last, we're going to take a look at a switch and see how switches operate and actually do a demonstration where we log into a switch that's a managed switch and take a look at that MAC address table.

Switching Features
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this next section we're going to take a look at switching features, which is an advanced section of learning how switches work. So our goals this module, we're going to take a look at broadcast storms and how we can prevent them. We're going to look at VLANs, which are virtual LANs that are combined on one switch. We're going to take a look at what mirroring switch ports are, and last we're going to take a look at power over Ethernet and see what value that provides us.

IP Routing
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. In this next module we're going to take a look at IP routing. Our goals for this module are going to be to look at the OSI model once again and review what layer we're currently discussing. IP routing happens at the network layer, so one of the things we'll do here is we're going to introduce network layer communication and what its ultimate goal is. Then we're going to look at the details of how this happens, starting with ARP, address resolution protocol. That is going to be a bridge for us in between layer 2 and layer 3. We're then going to describe the default gateway and how the default gateway operates. Then we're going to move into IP routing. Now IP routing is ultimately the goal of this entire module. Default gateway is actually part of IP routing, it's just the introduction to it. Once we get into IP routing, we'll take a look and see how routers actually move traffic across the internet. Then last we'll wrap this up with a demonstration of a little application called traceroute. Traceroute will let us see all of the IP addresses of the routers that exist in between my workstation and the server that I'm trying to communicate with on the internet.

Network Services
Welcome to Pluralsight, I'm Ross Bagurdes. Let's wrap up this networking concepts course by talking about network services. Let's take a look at what we're going to do in this module. We're going to go through the OSI model again, just like we have been through most of the modules in this course. We're going to take a look at some different types of network topologies. These are different ways we can organize a network. Additoinally we're going to look at network address translation, which includes port forwarding. We're going to look at what access control lists are and why we use them. Additionally we'll take a look at traffic shaping and then we will wrap up this course by looking at Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, DHCP, and Domain Name System, or DNS.