CompTIA Network+ (2012 Objectives): Part 2

Part 2 of 3 in the CompTIA Network+ (2012 Objectives) series. This CompTIA Network+ course teaches you the fundamentals of networking.
Course info
Rating
(240)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 7, 2012
Duration
4h 16m
Table of contents
IPv6 Fundamentals
TCP/IP Protocols
Network Devices
Routing
Wireless Networking
Securing a Wireless Network
Networking Command Line Tools
Network Performance and Optimization
Network Tools
Network Monitoring
Description
Course info
Rating
(240)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Aug 7, 2012
Duration
4h 16m
Description

Part 2 of 3 in the CompTIA Network+ (2012 Objectives) series. This CompTIA Network+ course teaches you the fundamentals of networking. You'll learn how to install, configure and troubleshoot basic networking hardware, protocols and services so you can successfully implement and maintain networks. If you're an aspiring network support professional or just getting started with networking, this course is right for you. This is an entry-level certification, so no previous IT experience is needed, but some familiarity with computer hardware and software will be helpful.

About the author
About the author

Ed Liberman has worked in technology for over 20 years. He has been certified and instructing IT since 1998. He has helped thousands of people to get started or advance their careers in the IT industry.

More from the author
More courses by Ed Liberman
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

IPv6 Fundamentals
(Loading) Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on IPv6 Fundamentals. Now in this lesson I want to tell you that we're going to focus on the word fundamentals, meaning this is going to be a very high level overview of IP version 6 and the reason why is because even though certain experts thought that IP version 6 was where we were going to be as far back as 5, I suppose some maybe even thought as far back as 10 years ago, even right now today in 2012, because that's where I am right now as I'm making this for you, we are not using IPv6 as heavily as we're still using IPv4. Okay so I just want you to have the basic understanding of what this thing is.

Routing
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on routing. Yes you heard me correctly, routing. This is a term that you've heard me mention throughout the course in many different lessons, unless of course you jumped right to this one first, but whether we were talking about hardware, we were talking about routers or maybe we were talking about TCP/IP and how routing works with it, well this is the lesson that I kept talking about when I said, oh we'll learn about routing. So you want to learn about routing? Here it is. So the first thing that we need to discuss when it comes to understanding routing is understanding the idea of routing tables. Now a routing table is something that is used by all network devices, okay not just routers, and actually I'm going to show you in just a moment here, even just a regular client computer will have a routing table and the reason why is because any network device needs this routing table in order to determine where to send a packet to when it's attempting to get it out and routed out to its final destination. Okay so when a computer or a router or any other network device has a packet of information and it knows what IP address it wants to eventually get it to, it has to look at a routing table to know what to do with that packet. Now one thing that might make this a little bit more clear is I would like to take you over to a computer that I have here and let's look at the routing table and I will tell you in order to do this, we are going to look at the route command because the route command is what Windows operating systems use to display and modify the routing table.

Securing a Wireless Network
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on securing a wireless network. Now in another lesson in this course, we learned the basics on how to set up a wireless network, whereas in this lesson we're going to talk about how to secure that wireless network. Let's go ahead and get started.

Networking Command Line Tools
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on networking command line tools. And I will tell you that in this lesson, well we're going to do just that. We are going to go through a list of command line tools and make sure that you understand what they do and then I'll even go in and demonstrate some of them for you. So the first couple of commands that I want to go over with you are very similar in nature, not only are they named similarly, but the functionality is pretty much the same. These two commands are IPCONFIG and then IFCONFIG. Now both are used to view TCP/IP configuration. The difference is IPCONFIG is for the Windows operating system, whereas IFCONFIG you will find in things like Unix, Linux, and Macintosh. We will take a look at the IPCONFIG utility in just a few minutes.

Network Tools
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on network tools. So in this lesson we're going to, you guessed it, look at a bunch of network tools. Now why are we going to look at these network tools? Well because it's very important that to be a successful network administrator, you have to know what tools you have available to help you to do your job. So let's go ahead and take a look at them now. So the first tool that I would like to talk about with you here is something called a cable stripper and although there's a picture of a generic version of a cable stripper, and that's all it does is it strips the outer insulation off a cable when you're getting ready to terminate it into a connector. You may recall, and I'm actually going to show you again in a little bit, that the type of cable stripper that I use is a little bit different than this one. Okay so that's one thing I do want you to keep in mind even as we're going through this entire lesson that the tools, although I'm going to try to show you as many of them as I can either in picture form or if I have an actual one here, they don't always have to look exactly like what you're seeing here. Okay they come in many different shapes and sizes. So the general idea here for a cable stripper is it's just that, it's going to strip off the outer insulation of a cable, typically when getting ready to terminate it into a connector.