EMC Storage Essentials

Learn the basics of storage technologies and EMC storage products.
Course info
Rating
(172)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 7, 2013
Duration
5h 41m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(172)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 7, 2013
Duration
5h 41m
Description

This essentials course will teach you basic storage knowledge. After completing this course, students will be able to navigate the broad portfolio of EMC Midrange Products and Software Suites, better communicate and understand common storage terminology, ask the right questions when purchasing an EMC Array, understand the topology of a Storage Environment, and supplement their learning in preparation for the E10-001 EMC Proven Professional Entry Level Certification. This course is suitable for those who have little to no EMC storage knowledge, however some level of storage exposure is helpful.

About the author
About the author

Joe Kelly has been designing and implementing virtualization and storage solutions for large and small corporate environments for over 10 years.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

VNX Physical Architecture
Hello, welcome to Train Signal. This is VNX Physical Architecture. So now we've moved into the architecture component here. To understand the architecture you have to understand some of the key terminology around that architecture. And that's kind of what we're going to go over in this lesson. So not everything is virtual, right? The VNX itself is a physical array. Things are moving in a very breakneck pace, they're moving toward an all-virtual world, even SANs themselves. But the VNX for today, is a physical array. It does have two different components to it. If you look at it from these two components you'll really understand, or be able to understand, the different components that make up the array itself. So, in general you have the block side and you have the file side. Now, there's specific hardware that is allocated to the block side, and there's specific hardware that's allocated to the file side. Some of the key components for the block hardware, are storage processors and DAEs, and we'll go over what those are here in a sec. On the file side, there are control stations and data movers. Now there's a lot of other subcomponents that make up these hardware components, but when I think of the block side, I think of a storage processor, an SP, and I think of DAEs, which is a disk array enclosure, which houses all your physical disks. On the file side, I think of control stations. It's a Linux server that basically allows you to manage the data movers themselves, and then you have the data movers, which are processing and ingesting information on the front end, via data center protocols, and then it's spitting it out to the backend on the block side.

Common VNX Terminology
Hello! Welcome to TrainSignal. This is Common VNX Terminology. Now, if you haven't guessed it by now, the VNX is an intelligent storage system. What makes it intelligent? What do you think? I think it's software. Software makes everything intelligent, right? But there's also some other components that are key elements in understanding what an intelligent storage system really provides. There's things like the back end. That's your connectivity between your SPs and your disks themselves. That is considered the quote unquote, "back end. " That is that SAS bus interconnect between those two. Your front end is really what your hosts are connecting to over your network, either over your IP network, your ethernet network, or a Fibre Channel network. And the short imports can consist of Fibre Channel ports, eight gig is common nowadays. It could be copper ethernet ports. You've got a couple different options, even 10 gig, and they're all coming across those front end ports because they talk data center protocols such as Fibre Channel, FCoE. And then they're hitting cache directly, which is really the next component of this. So data that is written to the front end usually hits cache first, and then an acknowledgement is sent back to the host itself. Another major component of the intelligent storage system is the disk, the back end disk. So all four of these together, with software kind of automating and steering and managing all of this, is what makes up an intelligent storage system.