Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Aug 21, 2015
Duration
1h 52m
Description

Throughout this Revit tutorial we will discuss how we can easily enhance our 3D families with 2D components. We will start with the big picture of the final curtain wall panel and move down to the small details in our family. We will learn how to model families to the appropriate level of detail and than to enhance them with 2D components. By the end of this tutorial you will be able to effectively create a complex curtain wall panel by nesting separate components. Software required: Revit 2014.

About the author
About the author

Jason is a Senior Digital Designer at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in New York City.

Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction and Project Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Jason Chen. I am a Senior Digital Designer at Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, and as a Senior Digital Designer I manage multiple teams and projects executing and utilizing BIN. I also work on creating from standards, best practices, and likely content. I've worked on many projects across different industries and at various skills. In this course we're going to build an intermediate-level kernel, and one that can also be used for documentation. Some of the key takeaways from watching this course include learning how to build a complex family using nested components, controlling graphic output of these components within the project, and layer additional information with detail items. By the end of the training you'll be able to model complex nested families and embed information with 2D detail items. I'm excited to share these tips and techniques with you, so let's get started with the first lesson.

Enhancing 3D Families with 2D Components in Revit
Hi everyone. In this course, we'll be building an intermediate curtain wall panel with nested shared components. Now in this course, we'll be nesting both model and detail components. Now, we are using nested shared components to allow us full control over all parts of the curtain wall panel in the project. Now, let's take a look at the final family. As you can see, it is a bit little complex in design. There are two ways to do this in Revit. The first way is to divide up the current wall with grids at every unitize panel, and then to manually change out the mullions were these major frames occur right here. The other method which we'll be going over in the course with be to develop a whole bed of units between the major frames. Now this way will allow us to use less grids to manage and it also create less unique manual edits. Such as changing out the mullions at each of these major points. You will start by building all the individual components that share models, and then combine them into a single curtain wall panel. Then we'll work with linking components, formulas and arrays. Let's take a look. As you can see this is one curtain wall panel. And if I tab select, I can select each of the individual panels and pieces. Here's a major frame, vertical frame. And here is a major horizontal frame, shading fins. You can even pick the individual mullions, horizontal and vertical. So let's get started by building the panel and the mullions first.