Exchange Server 2010: Backup and Recovery

This comprehensive Exchange Server 2010 Backup and Recovery course will teach you the skills needed to protect your data using resiliency, redundancy, and recovery.
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Feb 22, 2011
Duration
7h 47m
Table of contents
Getting Started with Exchange 2010 Backup and Recovery
The Course Scenario
Lab Setup
An Overview of Disaster Recovery
Storage Architecture and Backup/Recovery Basics
Windows Server Backup
Item and Mailbox Recovery with Windows Server Backup
Dial Tone Recovery with Windows Server Backup
Data Protection Manager Setup
Working with Data Protection Manager
Third Party Solutions: CommVault Simpana
Third Party Solutions: Asigra Cloud Backup™
Third Party Solutions: Actifio ™
Replacing Backup/Recovery with High Availability
Exchange Recovery Best Practices
Next Steps
Description
Course info
Rating
(18)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Feb 22, 2011
Duration
7h 47m
Description

This comprehensive Exchange Server 2010 Backup and Recovery course will teach you the skills needed to protect your data using resiliency, redundancy, and recovery. You'll work hands-on to analyze exchange environments, determine disaster recovery concepts, and customize your environment using command line tools. This is an advanced course, so you should have some previous knowledge or experience with Exchange administration.

About the author
About the author

J. Peter Bruzzese (one of the co-founders of ClipTraining.com) is an Exchange MVP and an internationally published technical author with over a dozen titles to his credit. In addition, he is a Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT) and a Triple-MCSE and MCITP for Messaging. He has been a technical journalist for 15 years and is the Enterprise Windows columnist for InfoWorld.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

An Overview of Disaster Recovery
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching An Overview of Disaster Recovery. In this lesson we're going to review key terminology and concepts for backup and recovery, and we'll talk about both minor and major disaster recovery. We're going to take a look at the following subjects: backup types, backup storage, and backup planning and management, and we're going to touch upon Exchange backup and recovery terminology, but at this point we're not going to really deep dive into that. We're going to slowly build up to the point where you have a full understanding of what's necessary to back up and restore your Exchange environment. Okay, so let's get started. So starting off with our scenario, this is going to be the DREC meeting at company headquarters. The CEO of Exchange Connections announces at the company's annual meeting that with the start of the new year, there will be a new Disaster Recovery division of Exchange Connections, also known as DREC. At the close of that announcement all members of DREC will head to the main conference room for two review sessions to be given by the division team leader, yours truly. As far as the members that will be present, it's true at this point we only have two technicians that will be handling disaster recovery, there's me, and there's you, but we'll also have support staff that assist us, and they'll be present at the meeting as well. Now we're going to be having two parts to the meeting, the first one is an overview of disaster recovery, which we'll discuss at this point, then we'll take a break for lunch, and after that there'll be a session on Exchange 2010 storage architecture and backup recovery basics.

Storage Architecture and Backup/Recovery Basics
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Storage Architecture and Backup/Recovery Basics. In this lesson we're going to review Exchange storage architecture, as well as some best practices for resiliency. Then we're going to take a look at the following subjects: deleted item retention, deleted mailbox retention, the use of the Server 2008 R2 Recycle Bin, then we'll go through a Windows Server backup review, we'll talk about database portability, recovery databases, and dial-tone recovery. It's a lot to take in all at once, but some of this is going to be presented at a high-level, the 100, 000 foot level, but then in future lessons we'll bring it down to the step-by-step level, and we'll show you how to literally do the backup and restore of your databases. Okay, so let's get started. So from a scenario perspective we're looking at the second half of the direct review sessions. You recall in a previous lesson that the CEO of Exchange Connections announced at the company annual meeting that there will be a new Disaster Recovery Division of Exchange Connections, also known as DREC. Now at the close of that announcement, all members of DREC went into the main conference room for two review sessions. The first one was an overview of disaster recovery, the second one, the one that we're actually going through now, is storage architecture and backup recovery basics. These review sessions are being given by the division team leader, yours truly. So to kick things off we're going to talk about storage architecture.

Dial Tone Recovery with Windows Server Backup
Greetings and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Dial Tone Recovery with Windows Server Backup. In this lesson we're going to show our client how to first, set up a Dial Tone Recovery Database, and then use a Recovery Database to recover the lost database and merge the two together. It sounds a bit convoluted to start with, but not to worry, we're going to map this out step by step. In the process, we will once again be working with Windows Server Backup, ESEUTIL, and the Exchange Management Shell. In the end, it should be very clear to anyone watching, that the merging of both the Dial Tone Database and the Recovery Database has worked and all is back to normal. Okay, so let's get started. So once again we're going to be visiting with the folks from St. Giro's Golf Course. Now with the number of mailboxes that St. Giro's Exchange server has to handle, combined with the fact that their business is not in need of immediate email, they would probably never need to perform a Dial Tone Recovery. However, to be thorough in our consulting work with them and ensure that they're prepared to do pretty much anything, we're going to show them how to perform the restore through a Dial Tone Database.

Data Protection Manager Setup
Greetings and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Data Protection Manager Setup. In this lesson a new client with a DAG configuration is looking for assistance with backup and recovery. We recommend to them System Center Data Protection Manager and we give them some of the behind the scenes information on getting it configured and preparing for larger backup scenarios through storage calculation tools. Okay, so let's get started. So, the new client that DREC is handling today is Borough Crossing Ferry. Borough Crossing Ferry has Exchange 2010 SP1 up and running with a Database Availability Group with two DAG servers. One of the DAG servers is located in Manhattan and the other DAG server is located in Staten Island. Now they have active databases in Manhattan that is the source databases and they have their passive ones in Staten Island, that is their target databases. So to start with we're encouraging additional servers because we realize that by providing additional servers then you have some server resiliency. In this case they have site resiliency and it's a continuous data protection because the active and the passive or the source and the target databases are in communication during the whole time that data is coming into the databases. However, at this time we're just going to focus on helping them to get their backup and recovery solution in place. So, for this company, Borough Crossing Ferry, we're recommending System Center Data Protection Manager. An obvious question for them is why are we not being encouraged to use Windows Server Backup? Well, in this case, because they're using a DAG, Windows Server Backup has limitations when it comes to backing up a DAG. So, we could utilize Windows Server Backup for backing up active databases in the DAG, but at this point and because they have the budget for it, we are recommending System Center Data Protection Manager.

Working with Data Protection Manager
Greetings. Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Working with Data Protection Manager. In this lesson we continue with our client, Borough Crossing Ferry, in helping them to learn more about System Center Data Protection Manager. The DPM server is installed, but we still have some configuration to perform before we can begin protecting our Exchange servers. Once we have the configuration complete, we will demonstrate how to protect individual Exchange servers, as well as members of a DAG. Okay, so let's get started. Looking back at our scenario, we're working with Borough Crossing Ferry, which has Exchange 2010 SP1 up and running with a Database Availability Group with two DAG servers. We have a duplicate of their environment running in our lab and we're showing them how to set up DPM and work with it. DPM is installed so the next step is to set up a storage pool, install agents, and then configure protection groups.

Third Party Solutions: CommVault Simpana
Greetings and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Third Party Solutions: CommVault Simpana. In this lesson, a new Enterprise-level client is looking for a third-party solution to provide Exchange recovery. Rather than provide a solution, we're going to provide options, starting with the in-house software solution, CommVault Simpana software. Okay, so let's get started. So the company that we're working with is called Coney Island Hot Dogs. And this is a franchise with over 1000 employees with multiple Exchange servers located throughout the United States. Now, you might start thinking, why do they need so many Exchange servers? It's just a hot dog franchise. Well, let's not think too much about the whys of it all. The more important thing here is that this is a client that's come to us and regardless of the whys of their setup, our obligation is to provide them with backup solutions. So they're looking for an Exchange backup solution with features that include data deduplication, the ability to immediately to restore a database, a mailbox or an email message, a possible cloud-based solution or a hybrid on-premise/cloud solution. They're looking at their options and at this point they haven't really locked in on any one feature that they absolutely need to have. And so we're going to present them with a few different options.

Third Party Solutions: Asigra Cloud Backup™
Greetings and welcome to TRAINSIGNAL. You're watching Third-party Solutions: Asigra Cloud Backup. In this lesson a new enterprise level client is looking for a third-party solution to provide exchange recovery. Rather than provide a solution, we're going to provide options. In this case Asigra Cloud Backup and Restore version 10. Okay, so let's get started. So in this scenario the company that we're working with is Coney Island Hot Dogs, it's a franchise with over 1000 employees, multiple exchange servers are located throughout the United States, and they're looking for an exchange backup solution with features that include data deduplication, immediate restore of a database, mailbox, or email message, and possibly a cloud based solution or a hybrid on premise cloud solution.

Third Party Solutions: Actifio ™
Greetings, and welcome to TRAINSIGNAL. You're watching Third Party Solutions: Actifio. So in this lesson a new enterprise level client is looking for a third-party solution to provide Exchange recovery. Rather than provide a solution, we're going to provide options, in this case, Actifio. Okay, so let's get started. So our client in this case is Coney Island Hot Dogs, they're a franchise with over 1000 employees. They have multiple exchange servers located throughout the Unites States and they're looking for an exchange backup solution. Some of the features they're looking for include data deduplication, immediate restore of a database, mailbox, or email message, with a possible cloud based solution or a hybrid on premise cloud solution.

Replacing Backup/Recovery with High Availability
Greetings, and welcome to TRAINSIGNAL. You're watching Replacing Backup/Recovery with High Availability. In this lesson we have a new client with a unique request. Provide resiliency, redundancy, and recovery, but without a backup solution. Can we do that? Yes we can. First we'll discuss how Microsoft has utilized this type of solution in-house, then we'll discuss the value of high availability. And finally we will present a high availability solution to meet their needs without a backup solution. Folks, this is the future. So let's get started. Okay, so Globomantics is a US based security brokerage house with Exchange 2010 deployed with some DAG HA utilization already in place. So a DAG is a database availability group HA stands for high availability. So Globomantics is already utilizing high availability to some degree. They've heard, however, that they can use their DAG and avoid backups. Is that true? Well we're going to find out. Let's first take a look at their environment.

Exchange Recovery Best Practices
Greetings and welcome to TRAINSIGNAL. You're watching Exchange Recovery Best Practices. In this lesson we're going to revisit concepts and best practice ideas that have been mentioned in other places during this course, but we want to review them with you to ensure you keep these items to the fore in your memory. We're also going to introduce you to a couple of pre-built calculators that can help you when working with your storage and your backup. Either a traditional backup solution or data protection manager. Okay, so let's get started. So we're expanding, disaster recovery exchange connections has done well, our department has had unprecedented success and so we're going to be growing. Now we need to regroup with new team members to ensure all are aware of the best practices that we've picked up along our journey. So all of the experience that we've gained in working with various clients of different sizes are now going to be pulled together so that we can pretty much just wrap them up and hand them over to the next generation.

Next Steps
Greetings and welcome to TRAINSIGNAL. You're watching Next Steps. So before we jump into where you might be going, let's talk about where you started. So you recall at the beginning of this entire series we set up a scenario. And in that scenario there was a company called Exchange Connections that was forming a new division for disaster recovery also known as DREC. And you were my new apprentice. Now over the course of the series we had a variety of different company types in front of us to consult for, ranging from small to large enterprise needs with different exchange solutions in play. You recall some had a simple solution, some had a DAG, and different budgets to work with. In wanting to provide solid solutions to our clients, we made an effort to mimic their needs in our lab environment and demonstrate to them all aspects of the backup restore process. And I don't know about you, but for me it's a lot of fun to be able to work through different types of demonstrations and literally see these things work. Because too often it's the case that you might read about something or an instructor might tell you about something, but it's another thing to see that it actually works right before your own eyes. And so that's what we've been doing through this entire series. You've had an opportunity not only to hear what types of backup recovery solutions you might utilize, but to see them in action.