Exchange Server 2010 Part 1: Initial Install and Configuration

Part 1 of 5 in the Exchange Server 2010 series. This in-depth course will teach you the essentials of working with Exchange Server 2010.
Course info
Rating
(174)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 22, 2010
Duration
4h 41m
Table of contents
Getting Started with Exchange Server 2010 Training
An Overview of Exchange 2010
Your Globomantics Scenario
Lab Setup
System Requirements and Prerequisites
Exchange 2010 Installations
Installing Exchange 2010 SP1
Working with the Exchange Management Console and Shell
Working with the Exchange Control Panel (ECP)
Transitioning to Exchange 2010
Description
Course info
Rating
(174)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jun 22, 2010
Duration
4h 41m
Description

Part 1 of 5 in the Exchange Server 2010 series. This in-depth course will teach you the essentials of working with Exchange Server 2010. You'll walk away from this course knowing how to install, configure, and maintain Exchange Server 2010 environments, as well as get to know some advanced features such as high availability and Unified Messaging. This course is intended for Exchange administrators looking to learn Exchange Server 2010, as well as administrators who are completely new to Exchange Server. To get the most out of this course, you should be familiar with some basic networking concepts and have at least a little experience working with the Windows Server 2008 and Windows 7 operating systems.

About the author
About the author

J. Peter Bruzzese (one of the co-founders of ClipTraining.com) is an Exchange MVP and an internationally published technical author with over a dozen titles to his credit. In addition, he is a Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT) and a Triple-MCSE and MCITP for Messaging. He has been a technical journalist for 15 years and is the Enterprise Windows columnist for InfoWorld.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Getting Started with Exchange Server 2010 Training
Greetings. I'm J. Peter Bruzzese, and you're watching Exchange Server 2010 Training. Welcome to TrainSignal. This is the first of many greetings to come, and we're going to start this whole series off with the video, Getting Started with Exchange Server 2010 Training. I want you know right from the beginning that this video series is like no other series you've ever seen. I'm not just going to teach you Exchange. I'm not just going to show you which buttons to push to make things happen. No, instead we're going to build an Exchange organization from scratch. In this course, we're going to take a company called Globomantics, which currently has a hosted email solution in place, and we're going to build them the ultimate in-house Exchange organization. You watch and see. We're going to do it together, so that by the time we're done, if we did work for Globomantics, you'd have the knowledge to take my job. In addition, because Globomantics acquires another company called Paraiso Brokerage, which currently has an Exchange 2007 organization, we're going to have to fly down to Brazil often and care for the transition over to an Exchange 2010 organization. And of course, we have to put in the little disclaimer that flying to Brazil is done virtually. No promises made that you, the student, will ever be literally flying, nor does TrainSignal wish to incur the cost for anything the instructor says that may lead you to literally fly to Brazil.

An Overview of Exchange 2010
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching the video, An Overview of Exchange 2010. In this lesson, we're going to review the purpose behind Exchange, the very heart and soul that makes Exchange what it is. Then we'll discuss the features that Exchange Server offers an organization. We will review the 5 server roles for Exchange 2010, and then we will highlight some of the new features in Exchange 2010 that will benefit both users and administrators. Okay, so let's get started. Email is a mission-critical communication tool. You know that. I know that. The question is how do you provide the capability for folks to take advantage of it? Do they just need email? Do you need to have an in-house Exchange environment? Could you outsource this and go with a hosted solution? Does that hosted solution have to provide Exchange features and functionality? Lots of questions, and each organization is a bit different. In addition, each messaging application is a little bit different, and so here in this series, we're focusing on Microsoft's Exchange Server 2010. So, what does Microsoft Exchange Server provide? Well, it provides a flexible and reliable messaging platform for business communications. At the very heart of Exchange Server, it provides email capabilities for your organization. However, going beyond that, it also provides calendar access and contact management. Users can have anywhere access to communications either through a browser, their mobile device, their Outlook Client while working from home, or even their phone.

Exchange 2010 Installations
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching the video: Exchange 2010 Installations. In this lesson, we will discuss and demonstrate the two key types of installations: Typical and Custom. First we will review the different environment sizes that you may be working with, and determine the server roles that you might deploy depending on your available resources. Then, we'll walk through the installation of four different Exchange servers, including the installation of an Edge Transport server. We have a lot that we're going to do in this lesson, so let's get started.

Installing Exchange 2010 SP1
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching: Installing Exchange 2010 SP1. In this lesson, we're going to discuss some of the Exchange Team points for deployment preparation, and we're going to walk through an installation and talk about some of the new features, like the automatic installation of Windows Roles and Features, and Active Directory and Exchange split permissions. So let's get started.

Working with the Exchange Management Console and Shell
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching the video Working With the Exchange Management Console and Shell. In this lesson, we will review three tools for managing Exchange: the Exchange Management Console, the Exchange Management Shell, and the Exchange Control Panel, which is accessed through Outlook Web App. First, we will focus on the use of the Exchange Management Console, or EMC, and explore the various panes, nodes, and actions that you can perform. Then, we will discuss the purpose of PowerShell and the Exchange Management Shell, focusing attention on how commands are formed using cmdlets and how they are made more complex and useful through pipelining. Okay, so let's get started. In Exchange 2010, there are three ways to manage Exchange as an administrator. The first way is through the Exchange Management Console. Another way is through the command line using the Exchange Management Shell, which provides you the opportunity to use specific Exchange-oriented PowerShell commands to manage your Exchange environment. And the third way, which is a new way, is through the Exchange Control Panel, which is accessed through Outlook Web App. The Exchange Control Panel only allows you to manage some on-premise tasks. It does not allow you the same level of control you would have through the Exchange Management Console or the Exchange Management Shell, and so we'll discuss the Exchange Control Panel in a future lesson. At this time, however, we're going to focus on the two primary ways to manage our Exchange, and that's the Exchange Management Console and the Exchange Management Shell, or for short, EMC and EMS. So for starters, let's take a look at what the Exchange Management Console, or EMC, looks like within Exchange.

Working with the Exchange Control Panel (ECP)
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Working with the Exchange Control Panel. In this lesson, we're going to do a comparison. Because many of the enhancements we see in Service Pack 1 relate back to what we had with Exchange 2010 RTM for ECP, we're going to show you the difference between the Exchange Control Panel with the RTM release and the Exchange Control Panel with the Service Pack 1 release. Some features we'll give more attention to in other lessons, for example, the Outlook Web App improvements, using the ECP to manage ActiveSync, Multi-Mailbox Search, and managing RBAC through the Exchange Control Panel. Okay, so let's get started.

Transitioning to Exchange 2010
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching the video Transitioning to Exchange 2010. In this lesson, we will explain the different terminology in play for upgrading your Exchange environment. We will discuss some of the side elements to a good transition, for example, legacy host names and certificates, and we'll perform a transition from Exchange 2007 to Exchange 2010. In order to do that, we're going to move mailboxes, move public folders, and handle additional concerns like the offline address book generation. At the end of it all, we will decommission the Exchange 2007 environment and be left with an Exchange 2010 organization. Okay, so let's get started. So to get started with this video, we have to actually go back to our scenario. We're past the point of installation, and if you recall, we originally wanted to install all of these different servers that you can see here, and we did that. So now we have an Exchange 2010 Server that's located in Brazil, and it's working side by side coexisting with the Exchange 2007 Server, but ultimately the goal of the scenario was to eliminate that Exchange 2007 Server. So how do we accomplish that goal? Well it's time to go back to Brazil. Before we get started, however, we should review the different terminology that's used by Microsoft because if we're going to be discussing about upgrading or transitioning or coexisting and so forth, we should have the proper view of the terminology.