Exchange Server 2013: Configuration

This course is part 2 of 3 in the Exchange Server 2013 Administration series. This course will take a new admin into the world of Exchange Server 2013 and bring them to the point where they feel comfortable deploying it in their environment and feel confident they can implement the various features.
Course info
Rating
(101)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 29, 2013
Duration
3h 47m
Table of contents
Creating Recipients
Managing Databases
Mailbox Configuration
Mail Flow Configuration
Exchange 2013 Certificates
Exchange 2013 Clients and Mobile Device Management
Collaboration Mailbox Types
Exchange 2013 Permissions
Description
Course info
Rating
(101)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Jan 29, 2013
Duration
3h 47m
Description

This course is part 2 of 3 in the Exchange Server 2013 Administration series. This course will take a new admin into the world of Exchange Server 2013 and bring them to the point where they feel comfortable deploying it in their environment and feel confident they can implement the various features. Students should be somewhat knowledgeable with regard to Microsoft solutions. Server solutions like DNS, certificate services and Active Directory are essential. Any legacy Exchange knowledge the student may have will be helpful for them as well.

About the author
About the author

J. Peter Bruzzese (one of the co-founders of ClipTraining.com) is an Exchange MVP and an internationally published technical author with over a dozen titles to his credit. In addition, he is a Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT) and a Triple-MCSE and MCITP for Messaging. He has been a technical journalist for 15 years and is the Enterprise Windows columnist for InfoWorld.

More from the author
What's New in Office 2019
Intermediate
1h 33m
Mar 13, 2019
What's New in Office 2016
Beginner
1h 35m
Dec 18, 2015
More courses by J. Peter Bruzzese
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Creating Recipients
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Creating Recipients. In this lesson, we're going to talk about creating recipients for Exchange 2013. Now, on the surface, that may seem like a very narrowed topic, but there are many different recipient types, and they all have features and properties that must be explored thoroughly in order to know what you can and cannot do with each one. So, what we're going to do here is we're going to define each of the recipient types that you can quickly and easily create in Exchange 2013. We're going to take a quick walking tour of Exchange 2013 recipient types, and then we're going to look back at our scenario and we're going to look at performing different tasks that you might perform in a real world environment. Okay, so let's get started!

Managing Databases
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Managing Databases. So in this lesson, we're going to talk about Exchange Database Management. Every email that goes to your mailbox server must go into a database, and this creates challenges because of the huge variety of messages that Exchange handles. Really, you can get a message that's 1 KB in size, or you can have messages that have a PowerPoint document, or pictures, or a video, and really, this could make for a message size that goes 10 MB, 20 MB, it really just depends. And so Exchange has to be prepared to handle this random variety of different messages that are coming its way. All of it goes into a database. So the question is, how does Exchange handle its database management internally, as well as what we can do to ensure that we're giving the database our attention, making sure that we follow best practices and so forth. Okay, so let's get started!

Mailbox Configuration
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Mailbox Configuration. Creating databases and mailboxes to go in those databases, that's all part of what we do as Exchange administrators. But we have to go one step further, but Exchange is really a robust solution that has a lot of different settings for those mailboxes. And so mailbox settings might include enabling or disabling certain features, like unified messaging, or establishing policy settings and then applying those policies like an address book policy, or it might include delivery options, message size restrictions, and much more. So in this lesson we're going to discuss the various mailbox settings. We'll demonstrate a few and then we'll apply that to our scenario and we'll see what it might be like in a real working environment if we had tasks that were put in front of us that relate to configuring mailbox settings. Okay, so let's get started.

Mail Flow Configuration
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Mail Flow Configuration. Let's talk about the mail flow feature. Ensuring mail can flow properly within your organization may include a variety of items, including accepted domain configuration, email address policies, send connectors, and receive connectors. Now you might be thinking, well, what do you mean mail flow? When someone in my organization sends an email, I want it to either go to someone else in the organization or head out to the internet and find the other person that they're emailing, and when a person sends mail to my organization, I want it to come into my organization and get to the mailbox for that individual. And perhaps in your mind and for your situation, that's mail flow. And you're right. However, there are times, unique circumstances, where mail flow may actually be something other than that. It might involve, let's say, having a partner organization where mail flow is back and forth between your organization and the partnered organization. It might involve having a mail server that accepts email for more than just your domain, but perhaps other accepted domains. We have much to discuss, so let's get started.

Exchange 2013 Certificates
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal! You're watching Exchange 2013 Certificates. Certificates are essential to an Exchange deployment, and Exchange uses self signed certificates by default. Ultimately this allows clients to connect in like your Outlook clients or Outlook Web App clients, ActiveSync clients, they connect in and the server validates that it is the right server. But with a self signed certificate, there really is no validation that the server is telling the truth. So, self signed certificates, they do work, but they aren't appropriate for a production deployment. And the reason for that is because when you do connect up with an Outlook client, or Outlook Web App, and so forth, you do get some kind of an error, some kind of a warning, and in a browser without a web app, you'll even see a red banner for the address bar as a way of warning you that there's something wrong with the certificate. Now, there's really nothing wrong with the certificate, it's just that it's a self signed certificate. So there's no third-party validation that the certificate is correct and that the server really is valid. So we need to obtain and install better certs on the Exchange server for a production deployment. That's key if you're going to move your Exchange server from a lab environment to a production environment.

Exchange 2013 Clients and Mobile Device Management
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Exchange 2013 Clients and Mobile Device Management. Oftentimes when we think of client management, we think of policies. Now, Exchange does include a variety of different methods to control features, for example, through either virtual directories or through policies. And so we have Outlook Web App policies and Mobile Device Mailbox policies, and a variety of other management features. What we're going to discuss in this lesson is virtual directories and we'll discuss these two different types of policies, the Outlook Web App policy, and the Mobile Device Mailbox policy. Okay, so let's get started.

Collaboration Mailbox Types
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal! You're watching Collaboration Mailbox Types. So we all understand what a typical mailbox is all about, and we've also explored some of the other recipient types that you can create with Exchange, but in this lesson we're going to focus on collaboration mailboxes. Exchange is more than a tool for communication, but it's also one that assists with collaboration. As a result, we see a variety of different mailbox types that we can implement, including site mailboxes, public folders. Now, you might say, well, that's not actually a mailbox type, but it is now part of the mailbox database, and so it's been changed and modernized with the Exchange 2013 implementation of public folders. So we're going to talk about it in this context. And there are also shared mailboxes, which all three together, these are essential to aid your organization toward greater levels of collaboration. Okay, so let's get started.

Exchange 2013 Permissions
Greetings, and welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching Exchange 2013 Permissions. In this lesson, we're going to focus on admin and user roles under the permissions feature in the Exchange admin center. With smaller Exchange deployments, you might have just one individual or two individuals that have full admin control permissions over the Exchange organization. However, in larger organizations, the ability to delegate responsibilities is an essential part to administration of Exchange. As a result, we have Role Groups and Roles that are built in and can be expanded upon. And these are typically used with admin roles. There are also user role assignment policies that help control end-user permissions. Let's learn a bit more about built-in admin roles and these user role assignment policies. Okay, so let's get started.