Getting Started with Power BI for Business Professionals

The aim of this course is to provide the business professional with the skills and knowledge to enable them to turn raw data into powerful visual reports by way of practical and relatable examples.
Course info
Rating
(51)
Level
Beginner
Updated
May 16, 2018
Duration
3h 14m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Power BI Overview
Connecting to Data Sources
Data Cleansing & Combining
Creating Calculated Columns, a Date Table, and Relationships
Building Your First Report
Using Multiple Tabs and Filters to Provide Report Clarity
Publishing Your First Report
Sharing and Presenting Your Reports
Where Next?
Description
Course info
Rating
(51)
Level
Beginner
Updated
May 16, 2018
Duration
3h 14m
Description

The aim of this course is to provide the business professional with the skills and knowledge to enable them to turn raw data into powerful visual reports by way of practical and relatable examples. In this course, Getting Started with Power BI for Business Professionals, you will learn foundational knowledge of/gain the ability to end product/overall skill. First, you will take Twitter feeds and CSV files as raw data and build simple but very powerful visual dashboards. Next, you will manipulate and massage data to make sure the data is in the exact format you require. Finally, you will see how to create sophisticated reports that can be presented on laptop, browser, or mobile device. When you’re finished with this course, you will have the skills and knowledge to provide the type of data that today’s premier organizations require.

About the author
About the author

Ben is a Microsoft Project, Project Server/Online consultant, and Data Specialist with over 20 years of implementation experience. He has been a Microsoft MVP for nine years, as well as blogging on various project server scenarios, has articles published on the Microsoft Project User Group (MPUG), and is the author of Microsoft Project 2013 Plain & Simple.

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More courses by Ben Howard
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hello everyone, my name is Ben Howard, and welcome to this course, which is called Getting Started with Power BI for Business Professionals. The aim of this course is to provide the business professional with the skills and knowledge to enable them to turn raw data into powerful visual reports by way of practical and relatable examples. Power BI is the overarching name for a suite of products from Microsoft, and so early on in the course we dissect the product suite into specific components, explain the function of each one, and then focus on the two main programs that are most useful to the business professional, and that is the Power BI Desktop and the Power BI service. The course then takes, by way of example, some generic Twitter feeds and CSV files as raw data and shows that it's easy to build simple, but very powerful visual dashboards from even this type of basic data source. As business professionals we might have access to data sources provided by our organizations, as well as the plethora of data available in the public domain. Often the data isn't quite in the exact format we require it in, and so we need to manipulate and massage it in order to enrich and improve it to further meet our requirements. Power BI provides us with this opportunity, as well as the opportunity to consume and relate all of these different types of data to enable the business professional to provide the type of sophisticated reports that today's premiere organizations require and present and publish them via laptop, browser, or even mobile device. This isn't the only course we at Pluralsight produce that help business professionals manipulate data. You might want to check out Power Query course and our Power Pivot course. Both of these courses complement this power BI course and would further your learning. I hope you'll me, Ben Howard, for this course in order to begin your Power BI journey.

Connecting to Data Sources
Hello, and welcome to the second module in this Power BI course, which concerns Connecting to Data Sources. One of Power BI's strengths is that it can connect to and consume data for many different data sources. These include files such as CSV, Text, JSON, and XML, databases such as SQL, Access, Oracle, and DB2, Microsoft Azure storage formats including databases, blobs, and tables, online services such as SharePoint lists, SalesForce data, Stripe payment data, and many other defined services, and finally, Power BI can connect to more generic services such as web pages, OData feeds, ODBC queries, and many, many others. The list of data feeds that can be accessed by Power BI continues to grow with each monthly release.

Building Your First Report
Hello and welcome. My name is Ben Howard, and welcome to this module called Building Your First Report. In this module we'll begin to work with the visualizations which come with Power BI, and we'll look at how to import external visualizations provided by third parties. There are many types of visualizations, and so I'll make sure we cover all the main noes. So seriously, it's all about the visualizations. The visualizations represent the data so choosing the right visualization becomes a bit of an art form depending upon what you want your data to say. All in all, your report should tell a story about your data, and each visualization or combination of visualizations can do so in different ways. For example, both a stacked bar chart and a matrix can be used to represent the same data, but each represents it differently and tells the story in a different way. Consequently, each visualization has different formatting options, for example, the formatting options for a stacked bar chart are completely different to those for a matrix. Often, the formatting options can be fairly complex and it takes quite some time to get a visualization looking really professional. This is something that comes with experience, and it's fair to say that it is more of an art than science. Now it's not only Microsoft who produces visualizations, lots of third parties produce them as well. These other visualizations are available from the Microsoft store and have to be imported into your report. It's a good idea to regularly check out the store to see if any new visualizations have appeared.