InDesign CC Interactive PDF

In this course, you'll learn all about building and designing Interactive PDFs. Discover them from scratch and by converting print and other format documents using InDesign and Adobe Acrobat.
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 21, 2016
Duration
5h 41m
Table of contents
Introduction
Understanding Interactive PDF
Planning an Interactive PDF
Working with Interactive Objects
Working with Hyperlinks
Working with Interactive Objects (continued)
Building Interactive Imagery, Galleries, and Slideshows
Adding Document Effects
Building Navigation Systems
Incorporating Video and Audio
Applying the Finishing Touches
Description
Course info
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 21, 2016
Duration
5h 41m
Description

In this course, InDesign CC Interactive PDF, you'll learn all about building and designing Interactive PDFs. Discover them from scratch and by converting print and other format documents using InDesign and Adobe Acrobat. By the end of the course, you'll have an interactive PDF ready for publication within your organization or out to the world. More importantly, you'll have the confidence to keep building attention-grabbing, engaging, interactive PDFs long after the last video has played out.

About the author
About the author

As a freelance graphic designer with over 20 years' experience, Pariah sits on the Adobe Advisory Group, is an Adobe Freelancer, and is an Adobe Community Professional and a former trainer and technical lead for Adobe's technical support teams for InDesign, InCopy, Illustrator, and Photoshop.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction
Hi, I'm Pariah Burke, a longtime print publishing and digital publishing consultant and Adobe software trainer. I've taught thousands of professionals and serious hobbyists to design and produce nearly every type of publication possible. In this course, you'll learn all about building interactive PDFs using InDesign and Adobe Acrobat. We'll start out with the basics of planning and setting up an interactive PDF. Then, move into creating hyperlinks, and not just hyperlinks that jump to an outside URL, but hyperlinks that can jump to internal locations within the publication, and even go to specific zoom levels. Hyperlinks that can start emails and dial a telephone. Then we'll move into the really exciting areas of interactive objects, objects that make other objects appear and disappear, that start playing videos and animation and audio tracks. Then, we'll get into creating image galleries and slideshows. Then we'll move onto document effects, like creating popup effects and creating overlays. We'll wrap up by finalizing our publication, making sure it's accessible to the widest number of people, and that it's secure and has the restrictions and protections that you require. By the end of this course, you'll have an interactive PDF ready for publication within your organization or out to the world. More importantly, you'll have the confidence to keep building attention-grabbing, engaging, interactive PDFs long after the last video has played out.

Understanding Interactive PDF
Throughout this course, we're going to use a lot of panels, panels like the hyperlink, buttons and forms, media and layers. Of course, you can open these panels one at a time from the window menu and its sub-menus, but building interactive PDFs is such a foundation used for the power of InDesign that there's a pre-built workspace just to give you access to all of the panels you need for producing visually rich, engaging, interactive PDFs. To maximize my screen working space and to focus instruction on individual parts of the workflow, I will not be using this workspace throughout the course. Instead I'll be opening and closing panels as needed for each lesson. Otherwise, I would work in the Interactive for PDF workspace, which provides just about everything you'll need to complete this course, and your own interactive PDF publications. For that reason, I encourage you to work in the Interactive for PDF workspace as you progress through this course.

Working with Interactive Objects
The easiest way to convert a print publication into an interactive PDF publication is to take that print edition, and either build your interactivities on top of the static, flat, non-interactive objects, or convert those non-interactive objects into interactive objects. But first you need to make a copy of the file. So I'm going to go to File, Save As, don't Save a Copy. Save As creates a new copy and lets you work in that copy all in one step. Save a Copy creates a copy, but leaves you in the original. You want to make sure that you're working in the new copy. So I'm going to choose Save As, auto-geek - interactive. Now, I'm working in the copy that's completely separate from the print edition, the print edition's safe, I can begin adding my interactivities, and that's as simple as working throughout the rest of the course, creating your interactivities right on top of the existing page.

Working with Interactive Objects (continued)
Any container level object can be turned into a button, a text frame, a graphic frame with or without an image in it, a vector object, and so on. When I say the word button, try not to think of something like this. Instead, when I say button, try really hard to hear interactive object, because that's what buttons in InDesign really are. They're plain objects that have been given the potential for interactivity. A button doesn't necessarily have to do anything. A button could simply be an object that is controlled by some other object, also a button. For instance, if you want to make a previously hidden image suddenly appear, you'd create a button that, when clicked, shows that image. That clickable button might match the more common idea of a button, or it may not, it may look totally different. The image itself must also be a button in order to be controlled like that, to be hidden, or shown, even though no one will ever click on the image itself. Buttons are the heart of all interactivity in interactive PDFs. Buttons can link to URLs, internal or external, which is perfect for when you want to create hyperlinks outside of text. They can also make things happen. What kinds of things? Well, I won't spoil the fun. Throughout this chapter and most of the rest of this course, you're going to see some really cool things you can do with buttons.

Building Navigation Systems
I'm just going to say it, right here in black and white. You should build a Navigation System into your interactive PDF. By Navigation System, I mean how readers can move between your pages, next page, previous page, go to the table of contents, or go to the home page, go to the index, or wherever else you might want them to go. You should not rely on the applications, the PDF viewers, for people to navigate through your publication. You should build a Navigation System. Why should you build a Navigation System? Well, simply because PDF viewers are inconsistent. Acrobat or Adobe Reader has page navigation buttons in the top almost left corner. They're not obvious. It has scroll bars, which show up if your PDF is not in full screen mode. If it is, there are no scroll bars. Whether it is or it isn't, even if your users know how to hit the page up, page down, or arrow keys to go between pages, they may not know how to get to the home page, or the table of contents, or the index, or all of these other places in your publication you might want them to be able to go. And believe me when I say this, even the most obvious navigation, even just going between pages, going to the next page, sometimes the most obvious navigation systems elude readers, partly because the PDF readers or viewers are so varied and many. They all have different looks. It is your responsibility as the document producer to make your document obviously and easily usable and navigable. Plus it's a lot of fun to build your own navigation system.

Applying the Finishing Touches
Activating security on your PDF is a great way of controlling what people can do with your publication. To activate it, simply click the security button at the bottom of the Export to Interactive PDF dialog, and up pops the Security dialog. First, make a decision on who can open your publication. Do you want anyone to be able to open your PDF, or do you want to restrict opening with a password, so that only those with the password can view your PDF? If it's the latter, turn on the option to require a password, and then supply a password. I'm just going to type in the word password, so I don't forget it and because myself some major embarrassment by the end of this video course, unable to show you a PDF that I've created. If I click OK, it's going to prompt me for the password again, and I'll hit OK. As long as they match, InDesign will then apply the security. Now, I actually don't want to have a password required for opening the document, so I'm going to turn that off, but I do want to set some of the other permissions. So let's turn on a password to restrict printing, editing, and/or other tasks. Again, supply a password, p-a-s-s-w-o-r-d. Please don't use that password in a live document.