Reporting Services Report Development Fundamentals -Part 2

This course is for report developers new to Reporting Services and explains how to work with charts, maps, pagination, and interactive features
Course info
Rating
(293)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 29, 2010
Duration
2h 54m
Table of contents
Data Visualization
Basic Spatial Data Visualization
Page Layout
Interactive Features
Description
Course info
Rating
(293)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Dec 29, 2010
Duration
2h 54m
Description

This course continues building on the foundation established in the Reporting Services Fundamentals course. It explains how to work with all of the data visualization features in the SQL Server 2008 R2 release of Reporting Services, including charts, data bars, sparklines, gauges, and maps. It also explains features for pagination in print-ready reports and for interactivity in online reports.

About the author
About the author

Stacia Misner Varga is a consultant, instructor, author, mentor, BI Partner for SQLSkills, and principal of Data Inspirations specializing in Microsoft business intelligence technologies for over 10 years. She is a frequent speaker at the PASS Summit, IT/Dev Connections conferences, and various SQL Saturday and Microsoft-related events worldwide.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Basic Spatial Data Visualization
Hello, I'm Stacia Misner from Pluralsight. I'll be presenting Basic Spatial Data Visualization. Traditionally, charting has been the method of choice for visually communicating patterns and relationships in data. Often charts display these patterns and relationships across time, but using this type of information across space can be just as useful and enlightening. In SQL Server 2008 R2, you can use Reporting Services to present data in the form of a map. We create maps using spatial data, so before we get started building maps we'll spend a little time reviewing spatial data type concepts. We use spatial data types to create points, lines, and polygons. A map can represent a geographical location such as a point on a map, or it could show roots between locations. We can also create maps using polygon shapes such as a state or a province or a country. The easiest way to develop maps in Reporting Services is to use the Map Wizard. It builds a foundation for the map, and then we can configure each map component to fine tune the appearance of the map, much like you can configure elements in a chart.

Page Layout
Hello, I'm Stacia Misner, and I'll be presenting Page Layout. When designing reports, we have to plan not only for how to structure the data in the report, but also how to arrange report items, not only in relation to one another, but in relation to the page. So what is a page? Well, that depends on how the report is being rendered. A page in HTML is different from a page in PDF format. In this module we'll explore how rendering affects our report design. We'll also consider various properties that affect the page structure and which render formats use those properties and which ones ignore them. Last we'll learn about the two kinds of page breaks that Reporting Services uses, how to manage page breaks and how page breaks affect naming and numbering pages.

Interactive Features
Hello, I'm Stacia Misner, and I'll be presenting Interactive Features. Reporting Services has many interactive features that you can add to reports to enhance the online viewing experience for users. The first group of features that we'll learn about in this module affect the online report layout in one way or another. We can implement features that allow the user to modify the report layout by changing the sort order of data. We can also set properties in the report to keep column headers in view while scrolling to the bottom of a page. We can display additional information as tooltips when the user hovers over a textbox or chart element. Or we can use visibility to hide or show selected data. Reporting Services also allows us to implement features as navigation aids. For example, a Document Map is an interactive table of contents that allows the user to jump easily to different sections of the report. We can add actions to help the user easily move to information located in the same report or to access information contained in a related report or even a web page. And another option for linking a report to other information is to embed HTML links into the report.