Reporting Services Report Development Fundamentals - Part 1

This course is for report developers new to Reporting Services. It explains the development environment and how to get started building flexible reports.
Course info
Rating
(1143)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Dec 14, 2010
Duration
4h 48m
Table of contents
Introduction to Business Intelligence Development Studio
Basic Report Development
Tablix Concepts
Matrix Grouping
Introduction to Expressions
Using Expressions
Introduction to Parameters
Using Parameters
Description
Course info
Rating
(1143)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Dec 14, 2010
Duration
4h 48m
Description

This course provides an introduction to Reporting Services for report developers having no prior experience with the product by explaining how to use the development tools effectively, how to present and enhance data in a report, and how to create dynamic reports. The features and demonstrations in this course focus on the SQL Server 2008 R2 release, although most functionality (with the exception of the tablix control) also applies to earlier versions of Reporting Services.

About the author
About the author

Stacia Misner Varga is a consultant, instructor, author, mentor, BI Partner for SQLSkills, and principal of Data Inspirations specializing in Microsoft business intelligence technologies for over 10 years. She is a frequent speaker at the PASS Summit, IT/Dev Connections conferences, and various SQL Saturday and Microsoft-related events worldwide.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Introduction to Business Intelligence Development Studio
Hello! I'm Stacia Misner from Pluralsight and I'll be presenting introduction to Business Intelligence Development Studio. In this module we'll start learning about the development environment and business intelligence development studio for SQL server reporting services. And we'll do that from the perspective of a report developer covering some basic concepts that you need to understand before beginning to develop your own reports. We'll start by reviewing the report development process then we'll look at how to work with report projects in Business Intelligence Development Studio, also known as BIDS. We'll also cover the various commands that are available when working with the project structure in BIDS. And we'll discuss the project properties that you must configure before you can publish reports to the report server. After this introduction to project concepts I'll be providing a demonstration so that you can see exactly how to work with projects in BIDS.

Basic Report Development
Hello. I'm Stacia Misner from Pluralsight. And I'll be presenting Basic Report Development. In this module, we'll be reviewing data acquisition and design layout stages of the Report Development process. As part of the data acquisition process, we need to create Data Sources to provide instructions to the report server about where to locate data to be used in the reports and how to authenticate the request for the data. We also need to create Datasets to define exactly what we need to retrieve from the data sources for inclusion in our reports. Then we'll turn our attention to the design layout by exploring Report Items. These are the objects that you positioned on reports, such as textboxes and images. Data Regions are a particular type of Report Item that we use to display data. We'll explore the different options that we have available in reporting services for presenting data and reports.

Tablix Concepts
Hello, I'm Stacia Misner. And I'll be presenting Tablix concepts. In the previous module I introduced data regions. Now the toolbox window allows you to choose any of the three generic data regions for you report, a table, a matrix, or a list. Now, they're really the same type of report item called the Tablix. In this module I'll explain how the name was derived. When you add one of the three data regions to your report the properties governing the behavior of grouping and dynamic rows or columns are predefined to make it easier for you to lay out the report quickly. Before we explore these properties in depth, we'll review the starting point that each of these data regions provides. Then we'll start reviewing the properties of a Tablix and the different ways that you can populate the cells of a Tablix with text or data. We'll also explore how you use scope to control the results of an expression.

Matrix Grouping
Hello! I'm Stacia Misner and I'll be presenting Matrix Grouping. There are many different ways that we can structure the layout in a Tablix when we're working with row groups and column groups. Now if you've viewed the previous modules in this course, you already know that a Matrix layout allows you to set up groups that repeat rows or columns. But I this module, I'm going to show you more options that you have. I'll also show you how you can set up different layouts using static columns. That is columns that don't repeat. And I'll be explaining the use of adjacent groups, where we can use multiple groups in the same Tablix without using a hierarchical structure to nest one group inside another.

Introduction to Expressions
Hello, I'm Stacia Misner and I'll be presenting Introduction to Expressions. The focus of the previous modules in this course has been on presenting and structuring data from queries in your report. In this module, you'll start learning about expressions and how to work with expressions in the BIDS interface. We'll start with an overview of what's possible with expressions. Then we'll review how placeholders can be used in simple expressions to make it easier to interpret the report design layout. Next, we'll discuss the Globals collections that you can reference in expressions and look at some practical examples of how they might be used. Then we'll take a tour of the expression editor before we start creating complex expressions in the next module so that you understand first how to take advantage of its features.

Using Expressions
Hello! I'm Stacia Misner and I'll be presenting Using Expressions. In the previous module, we've learned how to add expressions to our reports. In this module, we'll see a variety of ways that we can use expressions to enhance the presentation of data or to change the look and feel of our reports. We'll begin with a review of some common ways that we can use expressions in reports. Then we'll examine the variety of built-in fields that reporting services has available, fields that keep track of page numbers, the report execution time and so on that we can use either independently or as part of complex expressions. Many reports include numerical data that needs to be aggregated in some way. We'll look at the various aggregate functions available and revisit and expand on scope which was introduced in the module covering Tablix concepts. Last, we'll learn how to use variables and expressions. Variables are a feature introduced to reporting services in SQL Server 2008.

Introduction to Parameters
Hello, I'm Stacia Misner and I'm presenting introduction to parameters. There are so many ways that you can use parameters. The possibilities are really only limited by your own imagination. But before we explore some of those possibilities, we need to build a foundation by learning about how to get started with report parameters. Then in the next module, we'll expand on this foundation by showing other ways to use report parameters and how to link report parameters to query parameters. In this module, we'll review what it is that report parameters can do for you. Usually when you add report parameters to your report, it prompts the user for input and then you use that input in your report in some way. We'll step through the important properties that you need to configure when creating report parameters and discuss the various options that you have. You'll see these options put into practice in the demonstrations that we have for this module. The most common reason that we create report parameters is to apply a filter to the report. So we'll review how to set up filters based on report parameters.

Using Parameters
Hello, I'm Stacia Misner and I'm presenting using parameters. By using parameters you can add a lot of flexibility to your reports. Once you have report parameters setup, you can of course use them for filters as you learned in the last module. As part of your security strategy, you might consider setting up linked reports with hidden report parameters to have alternative versions of the same report available to different groups of users. You can also connect reports together and pass values from one report to another by using report parameters. We'll discuss two different ways to do that using either subreports or drillthrough reports and beyond filtering, report parameters are also useful in expressions. You can create labels to display parameter selections and reports and you can use parameters in expressions that change properties of report items such as colors, fonts, and visibility. Now going back to filtering we have another method, and that's the use of query parameters. By using a query parameter you changed the query in the data set that report execution time and there by limit the data retrieved from the data source. And another technique that we'll cover in this module is the development of cascading parameters which allows you to create dependencies between parameters. That is the selection of a value for one report parameter affects the available choices that the user can make for another report parameter.