Introduction to Visual Studio 2013 - Part 2

Learn to debug applications, the tricks of the designers, and how to install useful extensions to increase your Visual Studio capabilities.
Course info
Rating
(378)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 10, 2014
Duration
2h 53m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(378)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Jun 10, 2014
Duration
2h 53m
Description

Using Visual Studio well is about more than writing code, or reading code written by others. To be truly productive, you need to debug well, and understand the designers that help you build your user interface. This course also shows you how to add helpful extensions that make Visual Studio even better.

About the author
About the author

Kate Gregory is in her fourth decade of being paid to program. Her firm, Gregory Consulting Limited, is based in rural Ontario and helps clients adopt new technologies and adjust to the changing business environment. Current work makes heavy use of .NET and Visual C++ for both web and client development, especially for Windows 7 and 8. Managing, mentoring, technical writing, and technical speaking occupy much of her time, but she still writes code every week.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Basic Debugging
Hi. Welcome to Part 2 of Introduction to Visual Studio 2013. My name is Kate Gregory, and I'm going to show you some features of Visual Studio you may not be familiar with, including debugging, designers, and extensions. A lot of developers who believe they know how to work Visual Studio haven't learned about these parts of Visual Studio, so learning these can make a big difference to your productivity.

Additional Debugging Features
Hi. Welcome back to Part 2 of Introduction to Visual Studio 2013. My name is Kate Gregory and I'm going to show you some features of Visual Studio you may not be familiar with, including debugging, designers, and extensions. In this module, I'm going to show you how to take your debugging skills from the basic to the powerful. This is one part of using Visual Studio where I see a huge variation in abilities. Some developers who know code well, who know frameworks well, who are good developers, I watch them struggle literally for hours trying to see why something is happening. Someone else will come along, use a few more advanced features, and see the problem in minutes. It's one of the places where when I'm pairing with someone who doesn't drive Visual Studio to the extent that I do, they'll tell me, you just saved me half a day, and I know they're right. Now I can't show you everything, but I will take you beyond the basics and give you a debugging foundation you can build on.

IntelliTrace
Hi. Welcome back to Part 2 of Introduction to Visual Studio 2013. My name is Kate Gregory, and I'm going to show you some features of Visual Studio you may not be familiar with, including debugging, designers, and extensions. In this module, I'm going to use two of the features that are for Visual Studio Ultimate only, IntelliTrace and Code Map. IntelliTrace, it's like time travel for debugging. You can go back to when a bug happened and look at the values and flows so that you can see what happened. You can also debug something that happened on another computer, say opened and processed a file you don't even have. I know it sounds impossible, but it's not only possible, it's pretty easy. As well, I'm going to show you Code Map. It lets you understand large and complex code bases by constructing a diagram while you debug. Both of these features, as I mentioned, are for the Ultimate Edition of Visual Studio only, and so although they're really pretty different in terms of what you use them for, I'm going to cover them in the same module.

Working With Designers
Hi. Welcome back to Part 2 of Introduction to Visual Studio 2013. My name is Kate Gregory, and I'm going to show you some features of Visual Studio you may not be familiar with, including debugging, designers, and extensions. In this module, I'm going to turn from code to user interface, and specifically the designers in Visual Studio that you use to build your user interface. There are a lot of them, and they're all a little different. The good news is there's a lot of overlap so that when you learn how to use one, you often know quite a lot about the others too. The bad news is that the overlapping features seem to be the ones most people don't know about, and I'm here to fix that.

Extensions
Hi. Welcome back to Part 2 of Introduction to Visual Studio 2013. My name is Kate Gregory, and I'm going to show you some features of Visual Studio you may not be familiar with, including debugging, designers, and extensions. So by now, you probably know Visual Studio pretty well, especially if you have experience with another development tool, there may be things you wish Visual Studio did differently. Well good news. Visual Studio can be extended, meaning that other developers can write code that changes how Visual Studio works. In this module, I'll show you some free extensions that can make your experience with Visual Studio even better.