Cisco CCNA Data Center: Intro to Data Center Networking

Get started with Cisco Data Center Networking and prepare for the 640-911 exam.
Course info
Rating
(304)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 29, 2013
Duration
6h 50m
Table of contents
Introducing Cisco Data Center Networking
The Basics
Network Diagrams and Topologies
Data Flows and Value Conversions
The OSI Model
Virtual LANs (VLANs)
Media Access Control
Layer 2 Switching
Configuring Advanced Layer 2
IP Addressing Schemes
Public and Private IPs
Differentiating IPv4 and IPv6
Routing Protocols
Security Concepts
Cisco Switch Operation
Preparing for the 640-911 Exam
Description
Course info
Rating
(304)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 29, 2013
Duration
6h 50m
Description

Learn the essentials of Cisco Data Center Networking and prepare for the 640-911 certification exam, the first of two exams leading to the Cisco Certified Network Associate - Data Center (CCNA DC) certification. This exam aims to test a candidate's ability to handle a number of practical activities in a Nexus based networking environment, including access control, routing, and IP addressing. Any experience working with a Nexus or IOS based network would be valuable, but the course is focused on bringing an introductory level of knowledge to any level of candidate.

About the author
About the author

Chris Wahl has acquired over a decade of IT experience in enterprise infrastructure design, implementation, and administration. He has provided architectural and engineering expertise in a variety of virtualization, data center, and cloud based engagements while working with high performance technical teams on global reaching environments.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Media Access Control
Hello! You're watching a lesson on Media Access Control. To begin with, we're going to cover cabling standards, and you may be thinking, that doesn't sound fun, but trust me, come on, I've spiced things up, it will be interesting, and, quite frankly, it's really neat to see the history of how our cabling has evolved to where when once we were excited about 56K dialup, and 10MB connections to our computers, now I almost feel like gigabyte connectivity is slow. When I work in a data center, I think, gee, I need 10GB, 1GB is so antiquated now. So, that history has been quite interesting.

Public and Private IPs
Hello! You're watching a lesson on Private and Public IPs. Now before we go into exactly the private and public side of things, I wanted to make sure that we're still all on the same page on the three different classes of classful addressing. Now, we don't really use classful addressing anymore, it's been retired for quite some time, but the terminology and the understanding of what these three different classes are is still prevalent. Now, that's not to say you shouldn't know what the classes are. You still will be assigned, or consume an address in one of these three classes, because, remember, the class is really all about the leading bit of the IP. With Class A, starting with a leading bit, or most significant bit of 0. Class B begins with a 10, it's not a ten, it's a 1 and a 0. And Class C, the leading bits of the IP are 110. Now, again, I throw in here that typically people will say a mask for Class A is the first octet being 255s, Class B being two octets of 255s, and Class C being three octets of 255s. But don't get confused, that doesn't actually define the class, but I want to make sure we all know where these different classes exist.